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Jazz & More Guitar Lessons: Adding Chromatics to Your Vocabulary

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Jazz Basics, Adding Chromatics
to Your Vocabulary Part 1.
One thing that I've noticed is a big
problem for the students on the site, for
most of you guys, is to naturally
use chromatics as embellishment and
as passing tones in between arpeggios,
triads, and scale tones.
And this is something that if you get this
right it will really sound like jazz,
like the language of bebop.
But if you don't get it right it,
something is missing, you know,
from your jazz vocabulary.
So I've decided to do
a lesson here where I'm gonna
explain a little bit how I do chromatics,
how I think about it.
For instance we have a scale,
we have a C major scale.
C, D, E, F, G, A, B, C.
[MUSIC].
You got finger it after like, as you like-
[MUSIC]
So when I improvise here,
if I have a C major 7 chord,
I would use the C major 7 arpeggio.
[MUSIC]
C.
[MUSIC]
3rd E.
[MUSIC]
5th.
[MUSIC]
G.
[MUSIC]
And 7th.
[MUSIC]
B.
[MUSIC]
And I mix that with the scale.
[MUSIC]
To make that sound even more jazzy,
I will add these chromatics.
Now listen.
[MUSIC]
So in between the scale tones,
if I'm going here.
B, A, G.
I might do.
[MUSIC]
B, B flat, chromatic passing the note.
A.
[MUSIC]
A flat and G.
[MUSIC]
'Cause A flat is another chromatic passing
note that's not in the scale.
[MUSIC]
And you can do the same thing.
[MUSIC]
One octave down.
[MUSIC]
We just do one chromatic passing note.
[MUSIC]
Or.
[MUSIC]
That's another one.
G, G flat, F, E.
[MUSIC]
You can go up.
[MUSIC]
E, F, chromatic passing note, F sharp, G.
[MUSIC]
Here I started on A.
A, B flat, B, C.
[MUSIC]
You can do more chromatic, like,
almost like a whole chromatic scale.
[MUSIC]
You can also do a whole
chromatic scale going up, ascending.
[MUSIC]
Like that,
but it, it sounds better to choose
the places where you're doing it.
[MUSIC]
Jazz Basics, Adding Chromatics
to Your Vocabulary Part 2.
So you can also do eh,
chromatic enclosures.
So if you have the, for instance, the C.
[MUSIC],
you can do.
[MUSIC]
C sharp, B,
[MUSIC]
C.
[MUSIC]
Take any scale tone and
approach it chromatically from half
a step above, half a step below, and
then hit the target note.
[MUSIC]
And then, you can link it together.
[MUSIC]
Maybe like that.
[MUSIC]
And then play in and
out of it in a musical context.
[MUSIC]
Something like that.
You can also, a few other kind of
chromatic enclosures like this.
[MUSIC]
If you have the C here.
[MUSIC]
You play B, D, C sharp or D flat, B.
[MUSIC]
Same thing.
[MUSIC]
Practice like.
[MUSIC]
Approach all the scale tones the same way.
[MUSIC]
So that way you can get
that into your playing.
[MUSIC]
Or maybe just.
[MUSIC]
D, D flat.
B and C.
[MUSIC]
You can do the same thing,
move it around, may be do.
[MUSIC]
This one.
[MUSIC]
Approaching.
[MUSIC]
This notes G, C, G and C.
[MUSIC]
A.
[MUSIC]
A flat.
[MUSIC]
F sharp.
[MUSIC]
Aah.
[MUSIC]
To G.
[MUSIC]
D.
D, D flat, B, and C.
[MUSIC]
Same thing one octave up.
[MUSIC]
In minor.
[MUSIC]
Where it finds them.
[MUSIC]
We're gonna add this one too
[MUSIC]
F, E, D and, and E flat.
[MUSIC]
So
there's so
many chromatic enclosures you can do.
I explained some of them before in
the basic jazz block like the bebop scale.
You can always go back there.
Have a look at the Dorian mode and
the Mixolydian mode.
And after a while you can start
doing completely freely, you know,
with chromatics you can start like.
[MUSIC]
You just know where to start and
where to end.
And in between you can all,
all kinds of stuff.
[MUSIC]
So let me improvise
a little bit over your stuff,
C major Ionian backing track
using chromatic passing notes
the way I described here.
[MUSIC]
[MUSIC]