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Jazz & More Guitar Lessons: Rhythmic Comping

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Jazz Basics, Rhythmic Comping.
I've had a couple of requests from
my students about doing a video on
comping and rhythmic comping, and
especially within jazz and swing.
And it's a really good idea,
and I'm gonna do one right now.
When comping it's important to kind of
making it swing, staying in the pocket.
But also,
staying away from the solo player and, and
backing up the soloist instead of taking
too much space, being in the way.
It should like, be there, and, and kind
of enhance his performance, and help him.
And build up intensity, swing and
and also, it's important maybe
to start a bit more quiet.
And, and easy, and then build up
during the solo, using more intensity.
Rhythmically speaking within jazz it's
important to learn how to use syncopation.
'Cause if you would just play the chords
on a one, two, three, four, one, two,
three, four, one, two,
it's gonna sound so boring.
Even if you move one,
two, three, four, one,
two, three, four, one, two, three, four.
Or if you do one, two, three,
four, one, two, three, four,
one, two, three, four, one,
two, three, four, one,
two, three, four, one, two, three,
four, one, two, three, four.
You can also move it.
Put it on the two and so one and
two and one and two and three and four.
And one and two and three and four.
And one and two and three and four.
And you can do them longer too.
One and two and three and four.
And one and two and three and four.
And one and two and three and four.
And so on.
Two three.
And one, and two, and three, and four.
[MUSIC]
And one, and two, and three, and four.
[MUSIC]
And one, and two, and three, and four.
[MUSIC]
And one, and two, and three, and four.
[MUSIC]
And one, and two, and three, and four.
[MUSIC]
And one, and two, and three, and four.
[MUSIC]
And one, and two, and three, and four.
[MUSIC]
And slightly longer or one, and two, and
three, and four.
[MUSIC]
And one, and two, and three, and four.
[MUSIC]
And so on.
And then you can combine these,
both long and short.
[SOUND] Syncopation.
One, two so and on one, two, three, four.
And one and two and three and four.
And one and two and three and four.
And one and two and three and four.
And one and two and three and four.
And one and two and three and four.
And one and two and three and four.
And one.
[SOUND]
[MUSIC]
And
once in awhile you can put it on the beat,
so.
[MUSIC]
[MUSIC]
Then you can start to move around,
around the chords more freely,
voicing wise.
[MUSIC]
I mean, doing it one,
2 5 1 6 progression now.
Or 2 5 1 5 7 to 2.
D minor 7 G7.
C.
Major 7 and A7 for
the turnaround.
[MUSIC]
[MUSIC]
Sometimes you can find a rhythm
that you like, for instance a.
[MUSIC]
You can add some variation to it.
[MUSIC]
[MUSIC]
You can use more intensity.
Use more.
[MUSIC]
Use more different voicings,
putting them together like a melody.
But let me play along with the 2,
5, 1 backing track in all keys.
So you can hear a little bit what it
sounds like, how I would, would comp.
We already have piano voicings here,
comping.
But I will try to do something on
top of it, so you can imagine me,
me playing behind the soloist.
I'm gonna start kind of easy, and
I'm gonna build it up little
bit with the more intensity.
So here we go.
2 5 1
progression in
all keys.
[MUSIC]
[MUSIC]
Repeating a figure.
[MUSIC]
[MUSIC]
[MUSIC]
More intensity.
[MUSIC]
[MUSIC]
[MUSIC]
[MUSIC]
[MUSIC]
[MUSIC]
So, those are a few really
useful rhythms using syncopation.
You can check out a few of them and
come up with some of your own.
There are so many possibilities here
while improvising rhythmically.
You can use one idea, turn it around, flip
it around, develop it as much as possible
to get as much as possible out
of each idea that you've got.
So, upload a video playing along with this
backing track or one of the other swing
backing tracks and try to create
interesting rhythmic patterns and
send in a video and
I'll have a look and give you feedback.
Thank you.
[MUSIC]