This is a public version of the members-only Dobro & Lap Steel with Andy Hall, at ArtistWorks. Functionality is limited, but CLICK HERE for full access if you’re ready to take your playing to the next level.

These lessons are available only to members of Dobro & Lap Steel with Andy Hall.
Join Now

Basic Dobro
 ≡ 
Intermediate Dobro
 ≡ 
Advanced Dobro
 ≡ 
Lap Steel
 ≡ 
30 Day Challenge
 ≡ 
+Music
 ≡ 
Video Exchange Archive
 ≡ 
«Prev of Next»

Dobro Lessons: “Deep River Blues”

Video Exchanges () Submit a Video Lesson Resources () This lesson calls for a video submission
Study Materials Music Theory
Lesson Specific Downloads
Play Along Tracks
Tools for All Lessons +
Metronome
Collaborations for
Submit a video for   

This video lesson is available only to members of
Dobro & Lap Steel with Andy Hall.

Join Now

Information
 ≡ 
Course Description
 ≡ 

This page contains a transcription of a video lesson from Dobro & Lap Steel with Andy Hall. This is only a preview of what you get when you take Dobro Lessons at ArtistWorks. The transcription is only one of the valuable tools we provide our online members. Sign up today for unlimited access to all lessons, plus submit videos to your teacher for personal feedback on your playing.

CLICK HERE for full access.
X
Log In
X
[MUSIC]
All right.
Here we've got Deep River Blues, and we're
gonna go through this.
A lot of this takes place up here on the
12th fret in D.
And has, what I would consider to be a
roll pattern.
And what a roll is is you know, you, this
sort of comes from Bluegrass
type technique where you're using
[MUSIC]
three fingers to play notes in succession.
So in this case, you can either do it,
this would be a forward roll where it's
thumb, index, middle, thumb, index,
middle.
But we're gonna go reverse, middle, index,
thumb, middle, index, thumb.
[MUSIC]
So that's a good technique to practice,
is just this roll.
[MUSIC]
Just reverse roll, middle, index,
thumb, middle, index, thumb.
And this is, like I said,
it's a good practice technique to get your
fingers sort of working.
It can be a nice warm up.
So this starts with a couple of rolls
[MUSIC],
and the timing is important.
[MUSIC]
And then down to the 11th fret.
[MUSIC]
So
[MUSIC]
and then this is where the single
note playing begins.
[MUSIC]
So that's a bit of a handful
there, but not too bad.
[MUSIC]
So just try that phrase.
That's the phrase that's the second
measure.
12, 11, 12, 9, and then you jump up to the
high string.
Three, two, oh.
[MUSIC]
So once again, 12, 11, 12, 9.
[MUSIC]
Three, two, oh.
Little hammer on there.
[MUSIC]
And then you're up on the A chord,
seventh fret.
[MUSIC]
And
the second line is almost the same as the
first.
[MUSIC]
That's the first measure, and
then the second measure is these single
notes again.
[MUSIC]
12, 11, 12, 9 and jump down here.
Three, two, oh.
[MUSIC]
Hammer on.
Last measure.
[MUSIC]
That's all there is to it.
It's really only two lines of music.
But once you get it flowing,
it creates kind of a nice almost like Chet
Atkins type of fingerpicking sound.
Da da da da, da da, da da da da.
So once you get it up to speed
[MUSIC]
and sometimes when you want to
really emphasize that timing.
For instance when I do this hammer on at
the end of the second measure,
I hammer on, and then I mute it.
[MUSIC]
And
it creates this sorta staccato rhythmic
effect.
[MUSIC]
And the way I mute it is actually
with my right hand, so
[MUSIC]
you might wanna just try that.
It's, you pluck.
[MUSIC]
Hammer on.
And then mute with your finger.
[MUSIC]
And
then pluck the high string with your
middle finger so.
[MUSIC]
You know, it creates that type of effect.
So how it sounds in context
[MUSIC]
actually, I'm doing that with my thumb.
[MUSIC]
So I pluck it with my thumb, hammer on.
[MUSIC]
And then mute it.
[MUSIC]
And then
second line
[MUSIC]
again, the mute.
[MUSIC]
And the last line.
[MUSIC]