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Jazz Guitar Lessons: Constructing Scales: Melodic Minor

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Constructing Scales: Melodic Minor- Part
1.
Okay, so we, we have looked at
the construction of the major scale and
we learned the six positions
to play that scale in.
And remember it was all,
also the, Ionian mode and
we did a little improvising with it.
Now, we're gonna take,
a look at the minor scales.
The first one we're gonna
look at is the melodic minor.
Now, as, as you, may know if you, if you
know anything about, classical music,
the melodic minor scale in classical
music is a, is a kind of odd one
because it's different going
up than it is going down.
In the Jazz use of melodic minor we don't
change it going down it's the same scale
going up as down.
I just want to point that out because some
people get a little confused about that
when you say melodic minor they'll
remember their piano teacher saying,
well no it's different when going down so,
in this case don't worry about it.
The melodic minor actually, in the,
in the large arc of what we're gonna be
studying, is a really important scale for
jazz, it has a lot of very cool
uses in improvisation and so,
this is definitely not a dry exercise
this is something that some of the best
jazz improvisers that I admire,
have used this to great effect.
And hopefully you will too, and
that's why we're going to study it.
So, harmonic minor scale is the most,
is the closest to
the major scale of any minor scale,
because all you do is lower it a 3rd.
It kinda makes it easy to learn so
let's take that scale that
I was just showing you.
I'm, I'm gonna show you the harmonic
scale in all six positions,
but I would like you to learn this to
learn this in all six positions so
the major skill I did was
[MUSIC]
right?
That's the 1st position that we
talked about position number one.
The 3rd is here
[MUSIC]
right?
That occurs twice.
[MUSIC].
There and there now watch as I just play
the exact same scale with
just the 3rd lowered.
[MUSIC]
And
descending.
[MUSIC]
You can hear how that
changes the sound quite a bit.
So now I'm just gonna do it in a steady,
steady rhythmic way and
check out, I'll say 3rd when
I get there little, flat 3rd.
[MUSIC]
Flat 3rd this is all major.
[MUSIC]
Flat third.
[MUSIC]
Flat 3rd.
[MUSIC]
Flat 3rd.
[MUSIC]
So that's what the,
the melodic minor scale in position one.
Now let's do it in the same
key in position 2,
this is a G melodic minor scale the,
the major scale in position 2
[MUSIC]
that's the one that never goes out of
position, if you remember
[MUSIC]
right?
Now, I'm gonna do it slowly and
lower the 3rd.
The 3rd occurs
[MUSIC]
here and there.
Okay?
So here it goes.
[MUSIC]
Flat 3rd.
[MUSIC Flat 3rd.
[MUSIC]
Flat 3rd.
[MUSIC]
Flat 3rd.
Right, so, that's position 2.
Position 3, if you remember,
it starts with your pinky.
Now for me to do the, that position
in the key of G, I have two options.
One is to go all the way up
to the 15th fret to do it, so
that it's all closed strings.
[MUSIC]
Remember this is the one where you just
stretch up with your pinky
[MUSIC]
for the seventh degree.
So you the stretch is this way
[MUSIC]
right?
I mentioned that there's two options.
The other thing,
this is something you might wanna do to
challenge yourself it's a fun
thing think I can do it.
You can do this one actually
using open strings.
[MUSIC]
That's just something to think about
because you might find yourself in
that position at some point and
wanna use open strings that's
a little challenge to the side.
But for now, let's do it up on the 15th
fret and make it a melodic minor scale.
So where's the 3rd?
[MUSIC]
There's the first one.
[MUSIC]
There's the second one, okay?
Every time I get there,
I'll say minor 3rd instead of major 3rd.
[MUSIC]
Minor 3rd.
[MUSIC]
Minor 3rd.
[MUSIC]
Minor 3rd.
[MUSIC]
Minor 3rd.
[MUSIC]
One more time just a little bit slower.
[MUSIC]
Minor 3rd.
[MUSIC]
Minor 3rd.
Okay, descending.
[MUSIC]
Minor 3rd.
[MUSIC]
Minor 3rd.
And that's 3rd position.
[MUSIC]
Constructing Scales: Melodic Minor- Part
2.
The 4th position is kinda up here too.
This is now with the root
on the fifth string, and
this is the one with the shift in it,
if you remember.
[MUSIC]
Shift.
[MUSIC]
Now let's look at where the 3rd is.
[MUSIC]
3rd.
[MUSIC]
3rd.
[MUSIC]
3rd.
[MUSIC]
3rd.
Now we're gonna lower the 3rd and
I'll play it nice and
slow so you can play along with me.
[MUSIC]
Flat 3rd.
[MUSIC]
Lowered 3rd.
[MUSIC]
Minor 3rd.
[MUSIC]
Flat 3rd.
I, I made a point there of calling it
a lowered 3rd, a flatted 3rd, a minor 3rd.
As I said there are some
semantics involved here, but
remember it is a minor 3rd.
But you might hear people say, oh give
me a flat 3rd or give me a lowered 3rd.
I just want you to be aware of those those
other names you might hear for that note.
So now let's move to the 5th position,
this is in the same basic
area of the guitar.
This one starting with the second finger,
and
remember this is the one that
doesn't go fully up two octaves.
So I'll go below the root, the lowest
note and, to pick up more notes so
I have a full two octave range.
So, the basic major scale was this one,
[MUSIC]
with that stretch going back
there,
[MUSIC]
for the fourth degree.
[MUSIC].
And then going down.
[MUSIC].
So we get, actually, even a little
bit more than two octaves, this way.
Now let's make it a melodic minor scale.
Here's the 3rd,
[MUSIC]
right?
And you can
[MUSIC].
Here's the other 3rd.
And now we're gonna lower it.
[MUSIC]
Minor 3rd.
[MUSIC]
Minor 3rd.
[MUSIC]
Minor 3rd.
[MUSIC]
Minor 3rd.
[MUSIC].
And that's position 5.
All right, let's do position 6.
[SOUND] Last one.
This no going out of position on
this one in the major position.
[MUSIC].
However when we extend this, remember this
one was the other one where I have to
go below the lowest note [SOUND]
here to get the full two octaves.
When we do that, [SOUND] the lowest note
is the 3rd, so we will stretch back for
one note in this one for
the flat third when we get down there.
So the 3rd's in the major key.
[MUSIC]
There's a, there's one.
[MUSIC]
There's another one,
and we'll stretch back to make
that minor on that note also.
[MUSIC]
3rd again.
[MUSIC]
3rd again.
[MUSIC]
3rd again.
So, here the 3rd happens in three
different places, unlike the other scales.
So now I'll do it slowly
as a melodic minor scale,
and point out where those lower 3rds are.
[MUSIC]
Minor 3rd.
[MUSIC]
Minor 3rd.
[MUSIC]
Minor 3rd again.
[MUSIC]
Minor 3rd.
[MUSIC]
Minor 3rd.
[MUSIC].
And that's the melodic minor
scale in the 6th position.
Now I'm gonna play all six positions
of the melodic minor scale, but
not in the same key,
I'm gonna play them all in one general
area of the neck of the guitar.
And I'll, I'll point out what
the keys are as I do them.
And the reason I wanna show you this is
I include playing these minor scales in
my warm-ups, so I wanna add to my
warm-ups each time we learn a new thing.
This, this position, this one area is
where I usually do all my minor scales.
You can move around and do it in different
areas so you get familiar with them.
But basically, it's this.
A melodic minor, starting on the,
the 1st position on
the A on the fifth fret.
[MUSIC].
Now I'm gonna do B melodic minor, starting
on the seventh fret, second finger.
[MUSIC].
C melodic minor,
starting on the eighth fret.
[MUSIC].
D melodic minor,
starting on fifth string, fifth fret.
[MUSIC].
That one had that shi,
little shift in there.
And E melodic minor, starting on
the seventh fret on the eighth string.
[MUSIC].
And the last one position 6,
that's F starting on the A string.
[MUSIC].
And those, my friends,
are your melodic minor scales.
Go out and have fun with them.
[MUSIC].