This is a public version of the members-only Jazz Improv Guitar with Chuck Loeb, at ArtistWorks. Functionality is limited, but CLICK HERE for full access if you’re ready to take your playing to the next level.

These lessons are available only to members of Jazz Improv Guitar with Chuck Loeb.
Join Now

Basic
 ≡ 
Intermediate
 ≡ 
Advanced
 ≡ 
30 Day Challenge
 ≡ 
+Music
 ≡ 
«Prev of Next»

Jazz Guitar Lessons: Approach Notes

Lesson Video Exchanges () submit video Submit a Video Lesson Study Materials () This lesson calls for a video submission
Study Materials Quizzes
information below Close
information below
Lesson Specific Downloads
Play Along Tracks
Backing Tracks +
Written Materials +

+Basic

+Intermediate

+Advanced

Additional Materials +
Close
resource information below Close
Collaborations for
resource information below Close
Submit a video for   
Jazz Guitar
information below Close
Information
 ≡ 
Course Description
 ≡ 

This is only a preview of what you get when you take Jazz Guitar Lessons at ArtistWorks. Sign up today for unlimited access to all lessons, plus submit videos to your teacher for personal feedback on your playing.

CLICK HERE for full access.
X
X
X
[MUSIC].
Okay, let's talk about approach notes and
neighbor tones.
This is a really cool way to start
introducing notes that are outside of
the key into our vocabulary.
So we can get some
chromaticism in our lines.
Because not all the tones
that we use will be diatonic.
Some will be, but some will be chromatic.
And we'll start getting a lot of cool
chromatic lines going very soon.
So, let's start with
a very simple progression.
I'm just gonna go from A [SOUND] to
D [SOUND] and back to A [SOUND].
And right now we're going to keep it
as triad or even less than triads.
And talk about thee
approaches to each note.
I'm talking about the chord tones.
So thee basic A triad arpeggio or
[MUSIC]
A, C sharp, and E.
[MUSIC]
Take your guitar and try that
[MUSIC]
You can do it in a few different places
[MUSIC].
The know your neck, right?
We're gonna take those notes and
approach it with from one note below it
[MUSIC].
Well, that just ends up being a scale
[MUSIC].
Right?
And what about from one note above it?
[MUSIC].
Right?
So we're approaching it with a neighbor
tone either below or above
[MUSIC].
Right?
So that's right in the key.
Now let's take the same thing, but
do it, regardless of whether the note's
in the scale or not, do it with
a chromatic approach note below each one.
So the first one is in the key
[MUSIC].
G sharp to A is in the key
[MUSIC].
That one's not.
That's C to C Sharp.
And so, if you remember, I've been
saying many, many times, put a little
grease in it when you get to the third
[MUSIC].
Well, that's really, the grease is,
like, really just half step
chromatic approach though below the third
[MUSIC].
Right?
[MUSIC].
And the one below the fifth
is also not in the key
[MUSIC].
A half step below the E
[MUSIC].
Right and let's do it from, from above.
The first one is not in the key
[MUSIC].
B flat to A
[MUSIC].
Next one is in the key G
it's just four to three and
the next one is not in the key either
[MUSIC].
So that's from a, that's from above,
this is from below
[MUSIC].
Okay?
Approaching a note from
above diatonically and
below chromatically is
something you hear quite a bit.
For example,
[MUSIC]
you've heard that before, right?
So I'm diatonically above each note
[MUSIC].
And a, and
a half step below, so here is the above
[MUSIC]
that's a half step below.
In this case, that note is in the key,
so they're both diatonic.
A half step above
[MUSIC]
a half step
below
[MUSIC]
so that's not in the key, so
you get a little
[MUSIC]
a little sneaky thing there.
And then, a diatonic,
diatonic note above the fifth,
and a half step below
[MUSIC]
and then the note
[MUSIC].
Now let's hear it all together
[MUSIC]
I'll go to the D
[MUSIC]
it's cool.
[MUSIC].
So you're getting a little shape.
And really, we're just like, focusing on
those three notes in the triad, right?
Let's do it the other way around,
I'm gonna start below it,
chromatically, go above it diatonically,
and
come back down to the note
[MUSIC].
Kinda cool.
[MUSIC].
You could also just do that diatonically,
[MUSIC]
but I like the chromatic version better.
[MUSIC].
So we join it from below and then going,
from above,
then going below and coming up.
And then from below, going above and
coming down
[MUSIC].
You can mix those up, too,
I think may have just done that.
So now let's say all chromatic,
from above and
below, so
we're kinda surrounding the note, okay?
Let's start below, above note
[MUSIC]
that's kind of funny sounding.
So a half step below, that's in the key,
half step above, outside the key.
The note
[MUSIC].
Out of the key
[MUSIC].
In the key
[MUSIC].
It the note
[MUSIC].
Out of the key
[MUSIC].
Out of the key
[MUSIC].
The note
[MUSIC].
Kinda cool.
And then from above, below,
and then the note
[MUSIC].
Let's do that slow, let's do it together
[MUSIC].
One more time
[MUSIC].
Okay, so we've gotten a bunch of notes
that aren't' in the key stuck in there
just by surrounding each note of
the triad that we're playing, and
you're getting a different sound
in your ear from doing that.
Now let's make it a take
it a step further.
I'm gonna combine several
of those approach and
chromatic diatonic notes and
put them all together.
What do I mean?
I'm gonna go from below chromatically
[MUSIC].
Above diatonically
[MUSIC]
above
chromatically
[MUSIC]
below again, that chromatically, and
then the note, follow me again
[MUSIC]
I'm below,
now you remember the,
[MUSIC]
that was the first one we did, right?
Diatonic,
[MUSIC].
[LAUGH] So, I'm I'm below
[MUSIC].
Above diatonic
[MUSIC]
above chromatic
[MUSIC].
Below chromatic and the node
[MUSIC].
Listen to this
[MUSIC].
All right, let me put that in rhythm
[MUSIC].
Does that make sense to you?
So basically the cords you're outlining,
or
the notes you;re outlining
are just he notes in the cord.
Right.
[MUSIC].
Kind of a cool sound, and all we're doing
is surrounding each note of the triad.
Now, you can use these
kind of approach and
neighbor tones through the whole arpeggio,
and
the 7th arpeggio, for example
[MUSIC]
I added the 7th
[MUSIC].
You know
[MUSIC].
All of these techniques can be used and
experimented with our play along tracks.
And that's where really,
that's gonna be your laboratory for
how to make this work
through a set of changes.
Now we're gonna use one of my favorites,
All the Things You Are.
To really take a look at this technique.
[MUSIC]