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Fiddle Lessons: "Liberty"

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[MUSIC]
Okay,
so, another great classic tune, Liberty,
which is going to, be a little
challenging.
But I think you know, it's a great tune to
work on.
It's got a beautiful melody, and
it definitely covers a lot of the string
crossing stuff.
It covers some arpeggio ideas.
And it's just a beautifully constructed
tune, one of the most well put together
tunes in the, in the pile of tunes that
makes an American fiddle tune, collection,
you know?
And it is, it's great because it, it you
know, it
as a composition, you know, it's been
obviously, nobody wrote it, but it.
Kind of came together over, probably, you
know, 20 or
30 years of different people playing it,
and sort of, working it out, developing
it, and it's got a lot of great things.
It's, it's very danceable, it's got a lot
of techniques, so
we were talking about, string crossing,
going back and forth.
As sort of a rhythmic idea.
And Liberty is certainly very much about
that.
One of the strongest and
the very first part of the melody is going
back and forth.
[MUSIC]
All right, so we've got that, that sound.
Which, now, a lot of people probably
associate with sirens.
[MUSIC]
But
in this case, we can think of it as a
clarion call to the idea of liberty,
which is, of course, one of the things
that this country was founded on.
Which makes this a very emotional tune for
some people, including me.
So, we have that, we have that rocking
back and
forth on the E and the A string holding
down that F sharp note.
[SOUND],.
Now when we play,.
[SOUND], the A string, we don't take our
first finger off the string, we don't go.
[MUSIC]
No, we do not do this.
We hold our first finger down.
[MUSIC]
Right?
So, let's try that.
[MUSIC]
So next we play a little bit of a scale.
[MUSIC]
Right?
[MUSIC]
So
that is some string crossing, going back
and forth.
So we have this big interval.
[MUSIC]
Big difference,
a lot of distance between those two notes.
And then we have, small distances between
these notes.
[MUSIC]
And then, we have as an echo.
[MUSIC]
Right?
So we've got the G note on top and the B
note next.
And then we have,
after that we have another little lick
that's small distances.
[MUSIC]
Right, so it's like a rhyme, right?
And we have.
[MUSIC]
And then.
[MUSIC]
All right,
so it's sounds like a rhyme in a poem.
Or something like that.
Then we go back to the first one.
[MUSIC]
And
then we have like the punchline of a joke.
[MUSIC]
Right?
So we start on the G.
[MUSIC]
And
then the whole thing starts over again.
Repeats, right?
Because it's like most fiddle tunes, the A
section, which we just played, repeats.
So one, two, three, four.
[MUSIC]
Back again.
[MUSIC]
The second part starts with a combination
of a scale and an arpeggio so it's very,
you know, sophisticated.
Start with a long note.
[SOUND].
And then we play a descending scale.
[MUSIC]
In D of course.
This whole tune.
[SOUND],.
Is in the key of D.
[SOUND].
Right?
So, start on the A string.
[MUSIC]
And then we go up as an arpeggio.
[MUSIC]
Which is a beautiful run there.
So have that again.
One, two, three, and.
[MUSIC]
The second part.
Starts the same.
[MUSIC]
Right?
So, the first part again.
[MUSIC]
Second part,
starting the same as the first part but
ending a little different.
[MUSIC]
And
then we have the third part which is the
same as the first part.
[MUSIC]
And
then, the tag, the fourth part is just
like the tag on the first part.
[MUSIC]
So
it just ties the whole tune together in a
beautiful way by having the last part of
the second part be the same as the last
part of the first part.
So.
Again, this beautiful rhyming scheme.
Second part, one, two, three, and.
[MUSIC]
Second phrase.
[MUSIC]
Third phrase.
[MUSIC]
Fourth phrase.
[MUSIC]
And
then little bit of a shuffle right at the
end.
[MUSIC]
Same note.
Okay, so what do we have so far?
We've got the first part.
[MUSIC]
Now one of the nice things you can do with
this, if you're feeling frisky, is you can
actually play a double stop here.
[MUSIC]
Right?
You can play the A and the E string
together.
[MUSIC]
And then you can go down and play.
[MUSIC]
The A string and the D string, so
we have this sound.
[MUSIC]
Which is a great sound.
And one of the reasons this tune is so
great is that it really makes use of
the power of the fiddle to really get loud
you know, so,, we can play this.
[MUSIC]
[LAUGH] Pretty loud and
then really get the crowd going.
This just sort of harks back to when there
were no sound systems and
there may have only been one musician, the
fiddle player.
Was playing for a whole crowd up to a
couple hundred people in a bar in
somewhere, and they, you really need to
get people moving in order to play,
get people moving, you're gonna have to be
able to play a tune like this.
[MUSIC]
Same with the second set, double stops.
[MUSIC]
Right, we have.
[MUSIC]
So we can play those together,
would be, and the G.
[MUSIC]
Right, because they work, [SOUND],
and then go down to the D and A string.
[MUSIC]
So
even though I am going back and forth with
the bow, I am not moving my fingers.
[MUSIC]
Right?
And then we go back and play.
[MUSIC].
And then again.
[MUSIC]
Cool.
[MUSIC]