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Fiddle Lessons: "Bill Cheatham"

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[MUSIC]
Bill Cheatham, great tune.
And a great example of a sequenced tune.
You might not even think, you know, the
obvious sequence in this tune is in
the second part
[MUSIC]
But you didn't even think about
that first part as being a sequence, if we
really go to the skeleton of the tune.
[MUSIC].
That could even be thought of as a
sequence,
[MUSIC]
Back down.
[MUSIC]
And those are all,
all kinds of ways of varying that.
Because this tune is so well-known and
it's played by so many people,
it's, allows a certain amount of freedom
in interpreting the melody at first but
we, but as, as long as we know that.
[MUSIC]
That, that
that's our basic skeletal thing there's a
lot of things we can do referring to that.
I like to do a little bit of a bow trick
like this instead of.
[MUSIC]
I go.
[MUSIC]
So that, if we slow that way down it's
[MUSIC]
And then, if we look at it full speed.
[MUSIC]
It's just like a little bow dance.
[MUSIC]
That's what it is.
If we open it up, but it's just suggested.
[MUSIC]
So, down up.
[MUSIC]
Up down.
[MUSIC]
With a little rutig,
retake between the two ups.
Down, up.
[MUSIC]
Up down.
[MUSIC]
So, down up.
[MUSIC]
Down, up, down.
[MUSIC]
So.
[MUSIC]
That'll be a good thing to
practice just by itself.
[MUSIC]
And then,.
[MUSIC].
And then that's what I usually do instead
of going.
[MUSIC]
We could do that instead.
[MUSIC]
And then.
[MUSIC]
So.
[MUSIC]
All right,
so that's the first part some of the
interesting things about
the first part and then of course, is the
famous second part.
[MUSIC]
One more time.
[MUSIC].
Classic fiddle lick right there.
Again.
[MUSIC]
So there's all kinds of ways to think
about these kinds of sequences.
You know this is such a classic.
[MUSIC]
Even the idea of
making a very complicated sequence of two,
you could go, go, do something like this.
[MUSIC]
Still you know that, the second half,
even though it's very elaborate, it echos
the first half in phrasing,
and in the way that some of the notes very
much echo the shape of the previous thing.
So there's a lot of ways of getting the
point of this tune across, this.
[MUSIC]
And it just echoes of,
of each other the way this tune was
constructed.
So I'm just gonna play this now the way I
play it, a little bit slow.
[MUSIC]
And, you can hear it and
then maybe I'll play it a little bit
faster, I'll play it very slow.
One and
two and
three and
four and.
[MUSIC]
Now there's a lot of ways we can vary that
B part too.
We can play it down and octave.
[MUSIC]
We could do that.
We could start the sequence in a different
place.
[MUSIC]
[MUSIC]
Substitute a completely different sequence
for the same sequence in that in that
place.
There's a an amazing amount of things you
can do with this
tune once you've learned the basic tune.
So, I'm gonna play it once again a little
faster.
[MUSIC]
One, two, three, go.
[MUSIC]
So, that's the great Bill Cheatham.
[MUSIC]