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Fiddle Lessons: The F Scale: "Faded Love"

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[MUSIC] [MUSIC]
[MUSIC]
And there we have the F scale, F natural,
which again now what we are going to see
is very closely related
finger position wise to the C scale,
alright because,
the one of the scale of the tonic note F,
[MUSIC]
is played with our second finger, so
it belongs in that class of scales that we
start with the second finger.
So.
[MUSIC]
Everybody can find, find that note, and
of course, again it's F-natural, not
F-sharp so it's gonna be a low two.
So one way to find the F note is to play a
D, and
then play our E and then all of a sudden,
squeeze that second finger right against
the E note.
[MUSIC]
We have an F.
And then, that happens to sound very good
with an open A note.
[MUSIC]
So,
that is another way that we can tune up
that F.
[MUSIC]
And get that nice third-
[MUSIC]
major third with the open A.
[MUSIC]
[MUSIC] not,
[MUSIC]
not,
[MUSIC]
not, [MUSIC] Not that.
mmm.
But-
[MUSIC]
So again,
this is sort of like remember we played
the C scale.
The C was on the A string.
[MUSIC]
And
then [SOUND] and then we can't get to that
C.
But on F, which is nice because it's one
string over.
[SOUND].
We can, we can go from there.
We get a whole step there to the third
finger.
[SOUND].
Then the open A.
[SOUND].
And then we're reaching back just like we
did with the F natural on the E string.
We're doing it, this is a B-flat note.
And that is very important, Note of the F
scale.
So we're reaching back from B natural,
play B natural, and then we move back to B
flat, so between A.
[MUSIC]
[SOUND].
We were playing that interval so I want
you to kind of, get comfortable with that,
play around with that.
[MUSIC]
Try to get in tune with what I'm doing,
because you can say oh well it must be
right next back to the neck.
[MUSIC]
We don't want that.
You know that is, I'm, what I'm doing you
can see,
I'm playing right back against the nut
there.
[MUSIC]
And that is very low.
We're looking for.
[MUSIC]
A little bit higher.
[MUSIC]
And then another whole step to the C.
[MUSIC]
And then to the D.
[MUSIC]
[MUSIC]
And then open E,
[MUSIC]
and then, again, [SOUND].
the F is pretty far back, [SOUND], but not
completely far back.
[SOUND].
So the B-flat and the F, [SOUND]
you
can play them together if you bar across.
You can see.
[MUSIC]
I'm not doing this I'm just putting
the middle of the tip, the middle of the
tip of my first finger in
between the two strings,
[MUSIC]
making a slight adjustment
[MUSIC]
correcting the seasoning as it were
[MUSIC].
Playing the B flat and the F together.
[MUSIC]
And
you can do that all the way down but I
wouldn't recommend it right now.
Okay, let's take that F scale again from
the F,
on D string, second finger, low.
[SOUND] Here we go, one, four big beats
per note.
One, two, three,
four, one, two, g.
[MUSIC]
to a.
Ok here comes that big b flat.
And then a whole step to C, coming up on
D, another whole step, and
then here's the open E, almost there.
There's the F, stay on the F,
coming down
[MUSIC]
E.
[MUSIC]
D.
[MUSIC]
To C.
[MUSIC]
E flat again.
[MUSIC]
Open A then C.
[MUSIC]
And then F.
[MUSIC]
Now if we continue with this,
if we keep going
[MUSIC]
,.
D, C natural, B flat again, low two.
[MUSIC]
Now the G,
which is also part of the F scale, even
though it sounds a little weird.
[MUSIC]
It sounds weird to end on that note.
Right?
[MUSIC]
Because we can't quite get to F.
Just like in cee, we couldn't quite get to
the last cee on the high note.
Just, in eff, we can't quite get to the
last eff on the low note.
[MUSIC]
And
that's why I have eff fifth string on this
instrument.
Which is very handy for things like that,
you know,
but, I know that most of you don't have a
fifth string.
So, just try again to ignore this extra
string here.
[MUSIC]
We're on the bottom string for you guys,
the G string.
Start on the G
[MUSIC]
,.
A
[MUSIC]
,.
B flat [MUSIC] ,.
C to D
[MUSIC].
[MUSIC]
All right.
Let's keep going.
[MUSIC]
G flat.
[MUSIC]
F.
[MUSIC]
G again.
[MUSIC]
and an A.
[MUSIC]
That sounds pretty good.
[MUSIC]
[MUSIC]
And this last little double-stop here,
I'm playing the F on, on the D string and
I'm playing the A note,
with my first finger on the G string.
[MUSIC]
A very nice double stop.
So that is our F scale.
So again.
[MUSIC]
You want to practice it just this scale.
And just F to F.
[MUSIC]
[SOUND] And once you
get really comfortable with that, then I
want you playing from the bottom note-
[MUSIC]
[MUSIC]
[MUSIC]
Right, like that.
So yeah, so a great, a great scale it's
got some fun things in it, that open A.
[MUSIC]
Is very nice,
it's kind of a, kind of a radical note,
you know.
Which, can help us orient, little bit
different, you know,
not as common a key in fiddling as some
but you're gonna run into that especially
in Bluegrass a lot, so we definitely want
you to be comfortable with that.
All right.
We've got a great tune coming up to play
in F, and and once you're comfortable with
that scale,
move, you know, come in and move onto that
next part,
which is should be right after this part.
[MUSIC]
One, two, three.
[MUSIC]
[MUSIC]
[MUSIC].
So that is Faded Love, which is much,
much of the time played in two different
keys, not F, usually played in D.
In, in A, it switches key in the middle of
the performance.
But I thought it would be really fun to
just do Faded Love in F.
Because it fits very well on the
instrument, and
it's a tune that we all have heard and
know.
So it's it kinda works great, and the idea
that you can play
different tunes in different keys is super
important in bluegrass and
in a lot of other different kinds of
music.
And you're gonna see that.
In fact, you may very well wind up playing
Faded Love in F for
some singer who just happens to have a
range where they sing in F.
And that's very important, cuz it is a
song, not, not just a tune.
So let's look at this again, we're doing
some arpeggiation, there's a little bit of
scales, a little bit of arpeggios and a
lot, lot of melody in Fainted Love.
So, let's look at.
[MUSIC]
So there's,
that's that fa, in famous, Arpeggio to
start the, start it out.
And it starts with the five, fifth degree
of the scale.
If we start in F.
[MUSIC]
We get the C note.
Which is the fifth degree of the scale.
But we're gonna put it down.
We're gonna put the low.
C.
[SOUND].
Here, third finger on the G string.
[SOUND].
And then go to the F on the D string.
[SOUND].
And then the A string is open A.
[SOUND].
So we get.
[MUSIC]
And
then we can do this in a number of ways,
we can do downstroke.
[SOUND].
Up stroke on F.
[MUSIC]
And then another down on A.
[MUSIC]
Or we could do all up strokes.
[MUSIC]
Or we can do all down strokes,
which I would prefer.
So,
[MUSIC]
down, down, down.
And then down, down, down, down, down.
And then we move on to C.
[MUSIC]
And that's the long note, so,
we have, three short and one long, down,
down, down, down.
[MUSIC]
So it's C,
C again, D.
So let's try that whole thing from there
with a, the three downstrokes.
One, two, three, four, go.
[MUSIC]
[MUSIC]
Now, what did I do there with the bow,
I went,
[MUSIC]
da, long note, long note.
And then, that little d.
[MUSIC]
I kept that in the up bow.
[MUSIC]
So
I could have a nice solid down bow on the
downbeat.
[MUSIC]
All right?
So let's try that again.
We're having kind of a down bow festival
here.
[SOUND].
Up bow.
[SOUND].
Up, all the way up to F on the E string.
[SOUND].
A little bit of a turn, it's like, sort of
like an ornament.
It's like like a thrill, or something, but
slow down.
[MUSIC]
And
again, you see i'm doing that, all in one
bow.
Here we go
[MUSIC]
So, F, E, F, G, and then,.
[MUSIC]
So, E, to D,
to C, and again, I'm using.
[MUSIC]
Now, I could do it smooth.
[MUSIC]
Or I could go
[MUSIC]
Stop the bow slightly.
[MUSIC]
And that's a very long note we can play.
[MUSIC]
Which most people do.
[MUSIC]
So G.
Okay.
Let's take this whole thing up to there.
[MUSIC]
Up to F
[MUSIC]
[MUSIC]
Okay now, what's interesting is that
the second time we do that we don't go
from C, we go from F.
We just do a little less of the arpeggio.
We cut off the first part of the arpeggio
and go from F.
[MUSIC]
But then the same thing happens.
[MUSIC]
[MUSIC]
And this is where it's change is,
is different.
[MUSIC]
So
little pieces of the scale starting from
E.
[MUSIC]
And then starting from D.
[MUSIC]
And then a little bit of a.
[MUSIC]
You could do that or just stay on the F,
so it sounds like.
[MUSIC]
[MUSIC]
Or.
[MUSIC]
[MUSIC]
If you really want to keep it simple and
direct.
[MUSIC]
Right?
Because that is one word.
Although being fiddle players, we probably
wanna decorate a little bit.
So.
[MUSIC]
So come down.
[MUSIC]
Right down.
[MUSIC]
Right?
It's the arpeggio.
[MUSIC]
With a D note.
[MUSIC]
[MUSIC]
Let's
do this one more time with the backing
track.
And you can hear it and then be able to
slow this down.
Maybe take a look at it and run it as many
times as you need.
And to get, get that the flow too.
Because we got some long notes, we got
some short notes, we got some very long
notes and this is another reason why we
really want to be aware.
You know we want to use a big bow.
[MUSIC]
Yeah, especially.
[MUSIC]
If you're gonna do that you.
[MUSIC]
We wanna be able to move that
bow slow enough so that we can really have
it go for a long time.
And that is again, it's a skill that is
acquired with practice over time.
So we wanna make sure we do that enough.
Okay.
Here we go.
Let's have that that backing track here.
>> One, two, three.
[MUSIC]
Right, so there you have it, Faded Love.
Have fun with that, enjoy it.
And get that guitar track up.
And then play along with it.
And yeah would be interesting you know,
once you really feel comfortable with
that.
Yeah, why not yeah send me a video.
Feel free to send me you playing that
with, along with F-scale.
Again, after F, and
then from the lowest string from the G,
all the way up to the A note.
Or if you're feeling frisky, you know, go
ahead and play the B-flat.
[MUSIC]
All right with your fourth finger.
So, yeah, have fun with that.
Good luck, and yeah.
See you, see you on the page.
[MUSIC]