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Fiddle Lessons: The Five Chord Qualities

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[MUSIC]
All right, folks.
We're gonna do some more structural
harmonic exercises that are gonna
get us hearing and feeling, you know, all
these different colors
of chords that we're gonna be encountering
all through jazz.
And, just about every other kind of music,
really, you know for
it's, if you're thinking about it but,
because
we're going to be improvising a lot in
Jazz and making up our own melodies.
It's really important to hear the
structural,
these harmonic qualities and be able to
play them and spell them out.
So that we can hear, you know, hear them
well and play them.
[MUSIC]
So this is called the five chord
qualities.
I'm going to play you the five chord
qualities here.
We're going to start with major is again,
we're starting with major going toward
minor.
So we start with the happiest one.
[MUSIC]
And this is Western European, so
we're talking about just a regular major
scale.
[MUSIC]
Going to
Mixolydian scale which is a flat 7, also a
major but with a flat 7.
[MUSIC]
And then that.
And then we start into the the minors.
We're gonna start.
[MUSIC].
That's kind of a Dorian mode.
We could also play.
[MUSIC]
Or, and then, okay, and
then the next one would be like a flat.
We're flatting the 5.
[MUSIC]
So that's minor 7 flat 5.
[MUSIC]
Or.
[MUSIC]
Minor 7 Flat 5 and
then to the diminished which is not in the
Greek modes at all.
[MUSIC]
We're just gonna run through these five
qualities starting with the major 7.
[MUSIC]
To the mix a little in the dominant 7, 7.
[MUSIC]
Next one is our minor 7.
[MUSIC]
That 7 means it's a flat 7.
[MUSIC]
Okay.
If it's a major 7.
[MUSIC]
That's where we specify it, but
if it's just, if you just say 7, or minor
7, that means we're flating that 7.
[MUSIC]
Okay, the next one is a minor 7 flat 5.
So we're fating the 5 and the 7 and a
minor 3rd.
[MUSIC]
And
then the last one is diminished where we
flat everything even the 7th, so
what we get is a, it's a flat, flat 5, 7,
double flat 7 which means it's a 6th so.
[MUSIC]
So,
that's the five chord qualities that
you're gonna see in a chord chart in,
in all these different, you know, jazz
chords.
So what we want to be able to do,
is kinda just run those and hear them in
our heads arpegiating again.
Major 7.
[MUSIC]
It's a little difficult to talk and
play these at the same time so, again,
I'll say them, play them with me.
Okay, we start with the major 7.
[MUSIC]
Next is the 7 or Dominant 7.
[MUSIC]
Also a major.
[MUSIC]
And next is minor 7th.
[MUSIC]
Right, and next is minor 7, flat 5,
there's our flat 5, 7, big favorite
of Debussy and Ravel and all the jazz
dudes.
And then the last one is the diminished in
which we flat everything.
[MUSIC]
Big
favorite of Beethoven among others, right?
So the diminish.
[MUSIC]
So let's play this again in the key of G,
bottom two strings, here we go.
We see these, these again, it's a little
bit like the notes where different notes.
Descend ev, everything's dropped.
They continue to drop and get more minory
from a major situation.
So here we go.
Major 7.
[MUSIC]
Seven.
Minor 7.
[MUSIC]
Minor 7 Flat 5.
[MUSIC]
And diminished.
[MUSIC]
That's a tricky one.
[MUSIC]
Let's try that slow.
Minor, flat 5, try your fourth finger, and
then first finger.
Play the E natural, back up to the, what I
want you to be able to do,
is do that at a reasonable speed, thinking
while you're doing it.
Major 7.
[MUSIC]
And a slight brain aneurysm there.
Let's do it one more time.
Major 7.
[MUSIC]
7.
[MUSIC]
Minor 7.
[MUSIC]
Minor 7, flat 5.
[MUSIC]
Diminished.
[MUSIC]
Now
the trick is to be able to do that in that
position.
And then, we move the whole thing up to
the position one,
which the tonic note is on the first
finger.
So, we play for instance, here, we can
play it in the A or
we can play it in the E.
We could play it in B.
Let's play it in A.
[MUSIC]
More systematic.
[MUSIC]
So, major 7, right?
[MUSIC]
7.
[MUSIC]
Minor 7.
[MUSIC]
Minor 7 Flat 5.
Reach back with your first finger.
[MUSIC]
All right?
And diminished.
[MUSIC]
That's a little tricky.
That's, that's gonna be a whole kinda
different thing because we're.
[MUSIC]
Right?
We've moved our first finger and then
we're putting our second finger
[MUSIC]
Out in space there.
[MUSIC]
So the, the,
the aga, the second finger's like midway
between the first and the fourth finger.
My third finger's kinda waiting around to
get back to some other scale.
[MUSIC]
So that's gonna be a tricky one.
[MUSIC]
One way we can kinda orient ourselves for
this is.
[MUSIC]
That.
[MUSIC]
That note,
the 6th makes what's not, what we call a
tri tone.
With the minor 3rd so there are only a
half step apart so we can, if we.
[MUSIC]
That's
one way that we can kind of orient
ourselves to get that note to be in tune.
[MUSIC]
Right?
[MUSIC]