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Electric Country Guitar Lessons: Chromatics

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This page contains a transcription of a video lesson from Country Guitar with Guthrie Trapp. This is only a preview of what you get when you take Electric Country Guitar Lessons at ArtistWorks. The transcription is only one of the valuable tools we provide our online members. Sign up today for unlimited access to all lessons, plus submit videos to your teacher for personal feedback on your playing.

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[MUSIC]
Hey, what we're gonna do now is we're
gonna talk about chromatics
a little bit and I'll show you.
We're just gonna jump right in and kinda
show you a little bit how those work and
how I incorporate those into some
soloing concepts in the chord shapes.
So real quick before we
get started into this.
Just what a chromatic is, is it means that
it's just moving up chromatically or down.
So if I'm going up chromatically, I'm just
playing one note right after the next.
[MUSIC]
So G to G just chromatic is no
whole steps just half steps every time.
[MUSIC]
So that's what a chromatic is.
Now to use that in your soloing,
I wanna look at the big picture here.
So what that's gonna be is
[SOUND] If we're in this chord
in G [SOUND] and I wanna get from here
[MUSIC]
to there
[MUSIC].
I'm picking out that chord shape.
[MUSIC]
But for me to get from this note to
this note in that shape, I could do this.
[MUSIC]
Or I could go.
[MUSIC]
And that's outlining that chord.
[MUSIC]
Using some note leading and
some chromatics.
So what I'm gonna do is I'm gonna start
from my five to my flat three to my one.
So
[MUSIC]
So I'm going down
[MUSIC]
to the C, from D to C,
A sharp, B the major third.
[MUSIC]
So to get from here to here.
[MUSIC]
That's a little note leading where you're
prefacing that note by a couple
of other ones just to have
a little bit of movement
to make it more exciting.
[MUSIC]
So
that's doing
that lick over
all those chords.
So this is [COUGH] Then we'll get back
to the other lick that we just did.
But let me just show you that.
So
[MUSIC]
That covers G.
Then your C [COUGH]
[MUSIC]
Right there.
D
[MUSIC] Or
[MUSIC]
Or
[MUSIC]
So G is there [SOUND] and
there [SOUND] And there [SOUND] So
there's three different
positions of the same five,
three, five three, five three one.
So,
[MUSIC]
And you can create little licks out of
those shapes.
So this shape here, doing this lick
[MUSIC]
I'm taking these notes
[MUSIC]
right out of the scale, and
just dancing around them a little
bit with these chromatics.
[MUSIC]
Down from the six
[MUSIC]
to the five.
[MUSIC]
That's like an E minor shape or
a G6 shape right there.
[MUSIC]
So,
[MUSIC]
[SOUND] So
[MUSIC]
our target note [SOUND] that we're trying
to get to is there.
[MUSIC]
And then we're gonna resolve to G.
So a fancy way to get from this [SOUND] To
this note [SOUND] is
[MUSIC]
So [SOUND] we're climbing up to
that major third from the four,
four two, sharp two, major third.
So
[MUSIC]
Now watch, if I do that lick,
[MUSIC]
and I go down from G to F,
that's going to [SOUND] that's
going to insinuate a G7.
So
[MUSIC]
So right there.
[MUSIC]
Or
[MUSIC]
Which I would go here probably.
[MUSIC]
Cuz now we're outlining that C7,
so we went from 1 to the 4.
[MUSIC]
Cuz,
[MUSIC]
Flat seven to the four, the major three
of four, but going to the four chord.
[SOUND] So note leading there
too to get to that major third
of the four chord [SOUND]
which is your E note.
[MUSIC]
So
[MUSIC]
So right
there.
[MUSIC]
Right down the scale.
[MUSIC]
So
that would be like
[SOUND] result it from D.
[MUSIC]
cuz
[MUSIC]
You can do that.
[MUSIC]
Chromatic walk and down.
[MUSIC]
To the D7.
[MUSIC]
Resolving right to G.
So there's that little exercise in that.
[SOUND] And now you can use that.
That lick is a great one to use all
over the place, cuz it works here.
[MUSIC]
And out of that position, go up to D.
[MUSIC]
So
[MUSIC]
So
[MUSIC]
That's all note
leading there.
[MUSIC]
Just playing
over that D7.
[MUSIC]
More note
leading.
[MUSIC]
So that's
a chromatic.
[MUSIC]
So
we'll go the five chord in D
we go to the five chord A.
[MUSIC]
So we're just going
[MUSIC]
So there's a little lick that's
just straight chromatic up.
[MUSIC]
And then back down.
[MUSIC]
So that gives you a little
idea of how the chromatics work.
And you'll see more of that as I do
some different solo and techniques.
So that's what those are.
And like I said, right out of the chord
shape just connecting
[MUSIC]
That's a little chromatic.
[MUSIC]
Or
[MUSIC]
So you're just going
[MUSIC]
One three five.
[MUSIC]
Now that's just
going right back to your G.
[MUSIC]
So that would be in a western swing or
something like that.
[MUSIC]
So that's a great little note
leading right there.
[MUSIC]
So let's move on from there and
we'll move on to the next lesson.
[MUSIC]