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Electric Country Guitar Lessons: The 5 Minor and Major 7th Scales

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This page contains a transcription of a video lesson from Country Guitar with Guthrie Trapp. This is only a preview of what you get when you take Electric Country Guitar Lessons at ArtistWorks. The transcription is only one of the valuable tools we provide our online members. Sign up today for unlimited access to all lessons, plus submit videos to your teacher for personal feedback on your playing.

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[MUSIC]
Okay,
we're back here.
What we're going to talk about now,
and give you some examples
of are just a couple quick little of
my kind of country jazz concepts.
A couple rules, there's two kind of rules
that I use for this and I'll show you
kind of how to use these, how to resolve,
when to use them and this kind of stuff.
So this is going to be using some of
the 5 minor of the key you're in,
and the major 7s of some different keys.
We're gonna superimpose some
stuff here over some other keys.
So we're gonna get in in a blanket key,
like if we're in A
[MUSIC]
I know if I'm playing an A dominant 7
[MUSIC].
I can play out of,
I can go down a whole step
[MUSIC],
because this note
[MUSIC]
the G note is what makes an A7,
so when I lift this A up
[MUSIC]
and make A7
[MUSIC]
that's G note.
So if I'm doing an A dominant 7
[MUSIC],
I know I can go down a whole step to G
[MUSIC]
and play out of those major 7,
G major 7 scales and arpeggios
[MUSIC]
over A7.
And I want you to think of this in
a different term that anybody does,
a lot of people use these theoretical
terms when they're playing.
They'll say well that's
the five of this other key and
it gets to where it's
just mathematic problem.
And a math equation to try to figure
out how to play over a chord.
Man, I think that is just crazy because
if I had to think of all this math
that was going on with musically while I
was trying to play, it would never happen.
I can't think of music like that,
it's a sound and a feeling and
there's a couple rules,
some things you need to know.
But man to get caught in like all
the extensive Jazz theory and harmony and
looking at like, okay if it's a two
minor in A well then that's a so and so.
It's like just thinking,
this is a simple very simple
concept that'll get you playing
some really cool stuff really fast.
So A dominant 7
[MUSIC]
I know I can go down a whole set and
play out of that G major 7 ideas
[MUSIC].
So if I'm in C
[MUSIC],
dominant 7,
I can play out a B flat major 7
[MUSIC].
If I'm in D
[MUSIC]
dominant 7, I can play out a C
[MUSIC]
major 7, so
I'll show you what that sounds like.
So, here we are in dominant A7
[MUSIC],
and here's what that sounds like over top
of that.
So, here's A
[MUSIC]
and then here's a G
major 7 arpeggio
resolving to A
[MUSIC].
So A dominant
seven
[MUSIC]
so that works.
So that's G major 7
[MUSIC]
arpeggios,
[MUSIC]
resolving to A, so
that's the rule for that
[MUSIC]
and we'll show you a couple of
these ideas with the backing tracks.
Now, staying in the key of A but
moving to A minor
[MUSIC].
If I'm playing in A minor,
I know I can go up a minor third
[MUSIC]
to C
[MUSIC]
and play out a C major 7 and
it works over A minor
[MUSIC].
So if it's A minor, go up a minor third,
if it's A dominant 7,
go down a whole step and
play out of that major 7 shape.
So here's what G, here's what C major 7
[MUSIC]
sounds
like
[MUSIC]
played over A minor and resolving to that.
So here's
A minor
[MUSIC]
and here's C
major 7
[MUSIC]
one more time
[MUSIC]
so that works
over A minor.
Now that rule applies for all keys.
Now another thing I want
to show you is when I'm
playing out an A dominant seven
[MUSIC]
I can play out of the five minor of that
key, which is
[MUSIC]
E minor over A
[MUSIC].
So here is how that
sounds
[MUSIC],
so I did a couple
of E minor ideas
there
[MUSIC]
but I resolved
to the major
third of A
[MUSIC]
so I went right
there
[MUSIC]
so
[MUSIC]
resolving right to A,
the major third of A.
So, those are some tricks you could use.
So, here's another way to play
the E minor over A so
[MUSIC]
so there's the E
[MUSIC]
there's E minor, so here's a chord
[MUSIC].
So that's that chord I showed you earlier,
that
7th chord, that's an A [SOUND], A 7 but
[MUSIC]
so right there
[MUSIC],
that's an E minor shape
[MUSIC]
but in A, it's like an A 9
[MUSIC].
So look
[MUSIC]
that
all works
over a
seventh.
So that's my idea on that.
[MUSIC]