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Electric Country Guitar Lessons: Double Stops: Two Note Harmonizing

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X
X
X
[MUSIC]
Okay.
Now, we're gonna get
into double stops now.
And what that is is a double
stop is two notes together,
and it's based directly
out of the chord position.
So again, I really want you to visualize
these chord shapes, and we're gonna start
working with this pretty heavily here
with this concept of the double stops.
So big part of country,
chicken pickin' guitar style.
So what a double stop sounds like is this.
It's two notes, usually heavily
relying on the first finger and
barring these two notes.
So we'll slide into a chord like this
[MUSIC]
out of this D shape.
Remember I showed you the G shape
like this, I call it kind of like
the Hendrix shape cuz you have all of this
[MUSIC].
All those sounds are right out
of this shape, which is great.
We'll get to it, but
the double stop sounds
like this:
[MUSIC].
So that
[MUSIC]
is a double stop.
And we're gonna just work on this until
we have a good understanding of it and
see how it works with the chords.
And what we'd be doing is we'll be relying
on these two the double hybrid finger
technique here that we've been going over.
So it'll be pick
[MUSIC],
and then the two fingers for the hybrid.
So what we're gonna do here is
let's just work in D for a minute.
So we're taking the D chord and
were breaking it down to this triad
[MUSIC],
and then even farther than that,
we're breaking it down
to just these two notes.
D
[MUSIC]
right here, and G flat
[MUSIC],
or F sharp.
So
[MUSIC]
we're breaking it down into these two.
We're visualizing this.
This is why this is so
important to visualize these chord shapes.
Cuz we're taking this
[MUSIC],
and we're just breaking it down into these
two notes of that chord.
So then, we're gonna take this part
[MUSIC],
we're going to take that part of that
chord, and
we're just gonna play right out of this
[MUSIC]
right out of that pentatonic box shape.
But we're gonna end up
[MUSIC]
hitting these.
So
[MUSIC],
and then when we slide down,
we're covering D7 there
[MUSIC].
So
[MUSIC]
we're basically sliding down
to what's gonna be a D7, essentially, and
that's gonna give it a little bluesier
sound, a little funkier sound.
So that's gonna sound like this:
[MUSIC].
And we're gonna slide right down there
[MUSIC].
So let's play that.
[MUSIC]
One, two, three.
[MUSIC]
So that's the first
little double stop.
And then you saw the lick
I did earlier where I went
[MUSIC].
So what I'm doing there
is I'm sliding down
[MUSIC],
so I'm sliding from here
[MUSIC],
I'm actually going down to the E note
[MUSIC],
and that covers your D seven
[MUSIC].
Or we're hitting a G shape
[MUSIC]
here which is out of that chord
[MUSIC],
and that's just a little passing.
These are like the passing
notes to get to this
[MUSIC],
which is essentially your D7
[MUSIC].
So I'm taking that chord
[MUSIC]
and I'm just playing that part of it
[MUSIC].
So
[MUSIC].
When I go here
[MUSIC],
the bass note slides down to D
[MUSIC],
play the G shape
[MUSIC],
and then to C to play the F.
Well that's actually,
I just said F shape, but It's D7, but
it's also a part of that F chord too, so
[MUSIC].
And you're doing this in a rhythm and
you're definitely popping pretty
heavily with your right hand, so
it's this kind of syncopated rhythm
[MUSIC].
So that kicks into a little bit of
the double-stops and how that works.
Now, one thing that's a great exercise and
great practice to do with these
double-stops is if we're in D
[MUSIC],
we're mapping out these two notes.
So let's start here on the D7
[MUSIC].
So that's what we're gonna use for
these double stops all over the place.
And you're taking your D7 shape
even all the way up here.
This D
[MUSIC],
and then D7
[MUSIC],
with this shape
[MUSIC],
you're taking these two notes of it
[MUSIC].
The G
[MUSIC],
looking at that chord, so
all this stuff connects together.
[MUSIC]
that's out of the D shape
[MUSIC],
so we're going
[MUSIC].
Your C shape there
[MUSIC],
so we're going down
[MUSIC]
right there to your
[MUSIC]
D chord
[MUSIC],
so we're working that all the way down.
[MUSIC]
All that kinda sound.
[MUSIC]
You could do that if you want.
[MUSIC]
Go down chromatically.
[MUSIC]
So
that's a little bit of double stops in D.
[MUSIC]
And all these chords,
if you're looking at at D
[MUSIC],
this is your D7 here, this bar chord
[MUSIC].
When you lift this finger up
[MUSIC],
that gives you D7.
When you hit the C note
[MUSIC].
So out of this position
[MUSIC],
if you hit that C right there you're
getting a D7 right there
[MUSIC]
out of this shape
[MUSIC].
So if you just take these three notes
[MUSIC],
that gives you another little double stop
lick right here that
really comes in handy.
So
[MUSIC]
that's working right out of this D shape,
and you're hammering on from A to C
[MUSIC],
and then you're hitting those two notes,
which is the Major 3rd and the 1 of D
[MUSIC].
So that keeps you in the major sound.
So you're hammering on and
visualizing this
[MUSIC],
that chord with the seventh, flat seven,
that makes this a D7 shape
[MUSIC].
So that's using your pick
[MUSIC]
to get that phrase, so
the phrase is up to speed.
[MUSIC]
Okay, so let's play
that together real quick.
Just I'll count us in,
we'll do it kind of slow.
One, two, three, four.
[MUSIC]
Okay, and then lets play this solo one
together that we did a minute ago too.
We'll do this lick here.
[MUSIC]
So, one,
two, three, four.
[MUSIC]
And then what you can do is,
after you do that
[MUSIC],
then you're right here.
[MUSIC]
You can do something like that using these
notes I showed you earlier in
D to finish that phrase up.
So,
[MUSIC].
You can
[MUSIC],
so that goes all the way down to
the major third of D which is F sharp.
So
[MUSIC].
If you put that F sharp there you can
[MUSIC].
You can go low E.
[MUSIC]
I'm just showing you a little
way to get out of that,
[MUSIC]
but that's a little bit of
an exercise with some double stops.
[MUSIC]
Now, another really
common double stop is out of
your bar chord position.
[MUSIC]
So what that is, is where you're
playing right out of this chord
[MUSIC]
and you're playing these two notes
[MUSIC]
and then these two
[MUSIC]
like the G shape we just did.
So
[MUSIC]
and then rock it off the D
note on the base.
The middle D string, 12th fret.
[MUSIC]
So what I'm doing is,
I'm just hammering on to make this shape.
[MUSIC]
And I'm barring, but when I do that,
I'm barring right here and hammering on
[MUSIC]
because that gives me my 7 right there.
[MUSIC]
That chord.
[MUSIC]
So
[MUSIC]
if I'm hitting this
[MUSIC]
with the two fingers
[MUSIC]
pick.
[MUSIC]
You can't this without
hitting the bass string,
the seventh.
I mean, you can do that if you want
[MUSIC]
with plucking all three.
[MUSIC]
But you can also just do with two.
[MUSIC]
So that's a good double stop too.
[MUSIC]
So that's your one,
four, and five with that lick.
[MUSIC]
So let's play that together one time.
We'll start on D, and just do one, two.
We'll do D, G, and A, so.
One, two, three, four.
[MUSIC]
So there's some
little double stop exercises.
Another thing I wanted to talk about
with this double stop are these two
note harmony notes that we are using.
And another great exercise to
kinda get these under your belt.
All the double stops are are the chord
shapes moving down or up, and
would linking those together.
So taking this shape right here [SOUND]
out of this D chord and working it up.
[MUSIC]
And what we're doing
is we're just going up the scale.
[MUSIC]
And we're harmonizing
that with these two notes.
So we're going up the scale, but
we're playing the seventh note too,
[MUSIC]
the blue note, so.
[MUSIC]
So
that's a D shape there
[MUSIC]
that bar chord there.
[MUSIC]
And
then your C shape right out of that chord.
[MUSIC]
Your D shape there.
So
[MUSIC]
your G shape,
and then your D seven shape right there.
[MUSIC]
So
[MUSIC]
now you can do this,
going up in major too.
Without the blue note
[MUSIC]
that would be
[MUSIC]
and that's a good exercise too,
you got to know both.
Let's go up the major scale here too.
[MUSIC]
G, A, shape
[MUSIC]
out of that chord.
So
[MUSIC]
and then G shape here.
[MUSIC]
A shape here because
[MUSIC]
and then
[MUSIC]
so back down little B.
[MUSIC]
So that is just these shapes.
[MUSIC]
And I continue down and
show you their how you can do
that on all these other strings.
So to get the double stops
really under your belt,
the best thing to do and
the best practice is to take these,
take the chord shapes and
take two notes out of each one.
So down here at this D
[MUSIC]
take these two notes and go up the scale.
[MUSIC]
And that's right out of your shapes.
So you're going this D shape.
[MUSIC]
That's your C shape, but
you're just playing these two notes.
[MUSIC]
So you're harmonizing this.
You're basically going
up the scale like this.
[MUSIC]
And then here.
[MUSIC]
So together that makes this sound.
[MUSIC]
There's your D shape from this chord.
Right there.
[MUSIC]
So, that's why that works.
[MUSIC]
And then there's your G
shape from this chord.
[MUSIC]
A shape from that chord.
So right out of the chord shape.
[MUSIC]
G shape there.
[MUSIC]
A shape there from that chord.
[MUSIC]
So you're just looking
at these chord shapes.
So
[MUSIC]
there's your A shape, and
then right back to D.
So to see that there's your D
[MUSIC]
there's your A
[MUSIC]
there's your G
[MUSIC]
there's your D, again.
[MUSIC]
There's
your A
[MUSIC]
G
[MUSIC] D [MUSIC]
there's
your A
[MUSIC]
G
[MUSIC]
D again
[MUSIC].
So that is so
important to see how your one, four, five.
Just take your one, four,
five in those shapes and
work it all the way up the neck.
[MUSIC]
And just see where they all are.
And that's, all your double stops
are right out of these chord shapes and
we're gonna get into more
of this more heavily too.
But that's a great exercise,
take D right there, D,
one, four, five, one.
[MUSIC]
So, one, four, five, one.
One, four, five, one.
[MUSIC]
We got it here.
And if you go to, one
[MUSIC]
let's see.
One, four, five, one, four, five, one.
So then if you go to the next
group of strings, do it here too.
D, one, four, five, one.
D, G, A, D, and
then do it here, G, D, G, A, D.
And then the same here.
[MUSIC]
And then you'll see, okay, wow.
So then going up the scale
with these notes here.
[MUSIC]
So that's taking these two, and
taking this cord shape, and just taking
those two notes of it going up the scale.
So that's open, I'm saying open like
whole step, half step together.
Right here.
That's your G shape.
[MUSIC]
You can see that,
out of that chord.
[MUSIC]
And then right to there.
So I'm literally taking each.
[MUSIC]
I'm taking two notes of that chord,
and playing up the scale.
[MUSIC]
So I'm just mapping that out completely
with that, and all your double stops
are out of that, taking this D shape here.
[MUSIC]
So then that's how you're working those
together, you're taking
just part of that chord.
[MUSIC]
And you're using the base note
to kinda be a little accent note, so
[MUSIC]
so
[MUSIC]
that's going into a D seven shape,
cuz here's D.
[SOUND] There's D seven, so.
[MUSIC]
And
then when I
went down.
[MUSIC]
I just walked down
[MUSIC]
Chromatic right here.
[MUSIC]
Blues down.
[MUSIC]
And then major third.
[MUSIC]
To cap that off.
And we are gonna get into
that more as well to.
So that's a little bit
about the double stops.
And we'll get more advanced with that too.
But those are all the harmonized,
harmony notes right out
of those chord positions.
So again, just visualize the chord shapes
and really focus on looking at that and
seeing how those relate to each other.
Those are some good exercises there.
[MUSIC]