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Jazz Bass Lessons: Electric Bass: How To Practice

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[MUSIC]
Here's another way to practice these
scales to make them practical and
a little bit more interesting as well.
Now a days people seem to be preoccupied
with writing music in odd meters.
Of course, it's been happening for
many years but a lot of the young jazz
musicians are spending a lot of
time writing music in odd meters.
So, I'm gonna show you how you can
break up a simple major scale into some
different meters by grouping it by your
fingering and by your string change.
And I'll show you what I mean.
So let's take E Major and we'll start with
the one note [SOUND] and
then two notes [SOUND].
And then three notes [SOUND] and
then four notes [SOUND] and
then five notes [SOUND] and
then six notes.
And then seven
notes [SOUND].
And then the full scale [SOUND].
And I'll show you how to do it with this,
what I call rhythmic mapping of the scale.
So we go
[SOUND].
So I'm going, one, one, two [SOUND].
One, two, three [SOUND].
One, two, three, four [SOUND].
One, two, three, one, two [SOUND].
One, two, three [SOUND] One,
two, three [SOUND].
One, two,three,four [SOUND].
One, two, three [SOUND].
One, two, three, four, five,
six, seven, eight [SOUND].
So basically I'm going one, one [SOUND].
The first thing is two bars at one
beat per bar one, eights notes,
and then three, eight, two,
four, five, eight [SOUND].
Six, eight [SOUND] seven, eight.
[SOUND] Four, four.
I'll do it again, slowly.
One, two, one, two, three.
When I say one, two,
three [SOUND] that's three, eight.
One, two, three, one, two, [SOUND].
And that's a two four bar next.
The next one is a five eight bar but
its divided three and two.
So you go one, two, three,
one, two does that make sense?
So we'll start again,
we go one, one and one,
two, three, one [SOUND].
And two and one, two,
three, one, two, one, two,
three, four, five, six [SOUND].
One, two, three, four,
five, six, seven [SOUND].
So, in the middle, that sequence where
it goes five, eight, six, eight,
seven, eight, is like this.
And we group it three plus two is five,
three plus three is six, and
four plus three is seven.
So if we just start in that point,
we go one, two, three [SOUND] one,
two [SOUND] one, two, three,
four, five, six [SOUND].
One, two, three, four,
five, six, seven [SOUND].
One, two, three, four, five,
six, seven, eight [SOUND].
So that makes it more interesting.
So again from the top of the exercise
now your practicing your scales.
But your doing
some hip rhythms
one [SOUND].
Well, you can practice all
your scales like that.
The other thing is by fingering.
Maybe you do three-eight, and five-eight,
and four-four, it sounds like.
So, you go one, two, three [SOUND] one,
two, three [SOUND] one,two.
One, two, three [SOUND] one, two,
three [SOUND] one,two [SOUND], one, two,
three [SOUND], one,
two, three, four, five.
One, two, three [SOUND], one,
two, three, four, five [SOUND].
So you're basically taking 8 beats and
dividing them into three and
five beat patterns.
A bar three-eight, a bar five-eight.
One, two, three [SOUND] One,
two, three [SOUND] One, two.
The five-eight bar is divided one,
two, three, one, two.
One, two, three, one, two [SOUND] one,
two, three [SOUND] one, two, three, one,
two [SOUND] one, two,
one, two, three [SOUND].
You can also think of
that as the New Orleans
beat where you're
going, [SOUND].
And it give you something
rhythmically to play with.
So another way to do it is to put
a little clave and tap it with your foot.
So we're gonna do a clave
with our feet now.
[SOUND]
So now,
you can tap this.
See what I'm doing, that's a clave.
That's called a sonne clave.
It's three, two.
Because there's three
hits in the first bar.
One, two, three.
And the second bar too.
One, two.
One.
So
[MUSIC].
So that's a way to practice and
have something rhythmic to do and
play along with a little drumbeat or
a sequence.
I just got this from an app,
so that's one way to do it.
And this way,
you can practice your scales, and
practice some rhythmic independence
in what you tap with your feet.
So hopefully that'll help you, and
you can do all your scales like that.
[MUSIC]