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Art Lessons: The Pitch

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[MUSIC]
So now were gonna talk about the pitch.
Everyone’s heard of an elevator pitch and
that literally means and that comes from.
You're in an elevator with an Ad Exec or
somebody who's a higher up or
an important decision maker, and
you've got about ten to 20 seconds to
break your idea down to them.
It comes really from the movie world,
right?
So I have an idea for a script and I've
got about ten to 20 seconds.
That really is the elevator pitch of my
entire 150 page script.
How am I gonna sell that?
It's no different when you're an artist.
When you're an artist, people are coming
to you for your ideas.
So guess what?
You not only have to give them your ideas
visually, but you have to be able to.
Eloquently and ably articulate the vision,
okay?
So, how do you do that?
You gotta really be, you gotta think
shorthand about the pitch.
And with Darren and I, I, we've done oh my
g, I don't even wanna say how many.
We've done like.
>> Hundreds.
>> Hundreds of pitch meetings for film.
>> Sure.
>> For TV, Ad companies, commercials.
You name it.
And it's always the same thing.
They always want the ten to 20 second
breakdown of the high concept.
>> Right.
>> So my advice to you when you come in
there is don't come in there and
not think of anything.
If you co, if you're coming in there with
ideas.
Make sure your ideas are clear.
Make sure your ideas are short and simple
and obviously good and unique.
But look, ideas are a dime a dozen.
It's the execution of the idea that's
paramount.
The execution of the idea both visually
and
the execution of the idea with your words.
So you gotta really be able to tell that
story of your painting.
>> Yeah, I agree.
And what's really important is, is
preparation and role playing.
I mean, you can't just go into a, a pitch
meeting and
think that you're just going to, you know,
wing it.
You're, you're such a gifted person that,
you know, everybody's oh, my gosh,
that blew us away.
They're gonna be talking about it in
boardrooms for generations to come and
studying it at, at MBA schools.
No, you've really gotta prepare.
You've gotta know what you're doing, know
what you're talking about.
Sometimes we, we prepare pitched decks.
It sometimes helps people.
I, you know, PowerPoint presentation slide
one,
here's what we're talking about, slide
two.
Other thing that's really important in the
pitch meeting is there's a big difference
if you're trying to sell me your idea, if
you're selling it to me and
Bua can do this better than me, in a very
quiet monotone boring way.
>> I mean honestly I'm, I'm, I'm a lot
more theatrical when I go into a room
just because that's my nature in general
but I find that, that really works
that being said I've had disastrous pitch
meetings because I wasn't prepped for it.
Early on back in the days I've had pitch
meetings that I thought like,
oh I'm not, I got this don't even worry
about it, I've gone in there and
just like totally struck out.
So really gotta be prepared.
Gotta know your client's brand.
That is huge.
If you go into you know,
Nike and you start talking about something
that they did
five years ago they're gonna be looking at
each other like this is really off brand.
What is he talking about?
So when you go and pitch your ideas.
Read about it.
Study it.
See what's going on in their company and
try to think about how to take that to the
next level.
>> Yeah.
You don't wanna go in as you said, like
Nike, and talk about just do it,
when just do it was.
>> Done.
>> Done.
You wanna talk about where you think the
brand is at and where it's headed, and
you wanna be able to articulate why your
concept, your idea.
Is going to work within that brand
strategy.
The other thing too, is you gotta be aware
of going too blue sky.
Really, it's tough to say, but middle of
the road, safer is better.
I know we've all seen the movies where the
person just throws caution in the wind and
goes in there, tries to blow everybody
away with an incredible presentation.
That stays in the movies.
The truth is, you've got a bunch of
conservative folks
who have to play to a certain audience, a
certain demographic.
And they even have to answer to even more
conservative board of folks,
who are their client.
So, if you're dealing with a big car
company in Japan, for example,
they have a whole different set of ideas.
From that cool, smooth Seattle based
agency, right?
>> Now that, that doesn't mean that you
can't rep the culture up,
people hire me for me, that doesn't mean
that I'm trying to like fix you know,
Toyota or fix Nike or fix Apple.
You have to stay on brand, like he said.
So it's true.
Yeah, I got this crazy idea and it's gonna
make you even different.
Well then you're not gonna be Nike.
You're not gonna be Toyota or Apple.
So look, they're hiring you, bringing you
in for you.
That's what he's saying.
They're already bringing you in for you,
so don't fix their brand.
Just make it amazing.
Just do you amazing, but be prepared,
don't sleep walk into a meeting.
[MUSIC]