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Country Vocals Lessons: Pitch Exercise: Mock Me

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[MUSIC]
Okay, this lesson
is called Mock Me.
And it's just a game,
as like an exercise I like to play
to illustrate how we all
imitate sounds naturally.
It's one of our most
fundamental communication
skills that we develop
before we can even talk.
You know mothers,
if you watch a mother speaking to a baby,
they speak very softly and
they speak very melodically.
And aren't you the cutest little thing and
I love you so much.
And that's an intuitive, instinctual
method of communicating to the infant,
who obviously doesn't know the content,
the words that the mother is saying.
But they are learning by the use
of her inflection and her tone.
They're learning,
this is someone who's interested in me.
They're paying attention to me,
they are attempting to engage with me.
They are focused on me, and it's gentle,
and it's safe, and
I'm being taken care of here.
All of that information is in that one
little, [SOUND] aren't you just so cute?
So we grow up then having heard that,
and then we imitate it.
That's some of our first language building
moments, are in imitation of our parents,
who've been talking to us from day
one without our understanding them.
But we naturally start to
imitate them as soon as we can.
Something you never hear somebody say on
purpose, like ask you to do, is mock me.
It’s usually something that
we do to tick people off or
make fun of, or to ourselves when
we're hacked off at somebody.
Something that kids do to parents and
really annoys them.
But again, it’s a game,
it’s an exercise of imitating inflection.
So we're actually matching
pitch when we mock somebody and
we're exaggerating the inflection
that they're using.
So if I say, I really think you
need to clean your room, and
my daughter says, I really think
you need to clean your room.
She is matching the shape of my pitch and
my inflection, and exaggerating it.
That's kind of the definition of mocking.
But it's only effective if you
have matched it enough to make
the connection that, yeah, I heard what
you did and I'm doing what you did.
And making fun of it at the same time.
So I'm gonna get you to mock me.
Find this pitch.
You say it, find this pitch.
Find this pitch!
Let's see if we can find
that on the keyboard.
We don't make the connection
immediately between verbalizing,
between speaking and pitch,
notes on a piano, but find this pitch.
[SOUND] Pitch.
[SOUND] Pitch, pitch, pitch, pitch, pitch.
Find this pitch.
[SOUND] Find this pitch.
[SOUND] Find this pitch.
[SOUND] There it is.
[SOUND] Find this pitch.
[SOUND] Find this pitch.
Okay it took a little while,
but I actually found the notes,
the melody, of what I was just saying.
Find this pitch, find this pitch.
F sharp, E, F.
Find this pitch, find this pitch.
So I'm gonna give you another one,
I say it, you mock me.
So try to match it but exaggerate it
Pop music is the worst.
Pop music is the worst.
Pop music is the worst.
[SOUND] Pop, pop.
[SOUND] Pop, that's a D flat.
Pop music, ick, ick, [SOUND] ick, ick.
Pop music is the worst.
Pop music is the worst.
Worst, worst, [SOUND] worst,
[SOUND] worst, there it is.
Pop music is the worst.
I'm actually speaking in pitches.
And because I'm moving across them so
quickly, I don't identify them,
we don't hear them as pitches.
But if you start hunting,
you can find them on a keyboard.
They're actual notes.
So every time you speak,
you're actually kind of singing.
And a lot of what you're
communicating is contained in
where in your register you're speaking.
Are you speaking way down here
because you're really mad,
and your down in your chest voice?
Down here,
because you're really trying to get
someone's attention and
give them a sense of urgency?
Imitate me doing that.
I'm trying to give you a sense of urgency.
[SOUND] I'm trying to give
you a sense of urgency.
So you're imitating and finding my pitch.
This is something we do
intuitively as human beings.
[MUSIC]
[MUSIC]
So we're gonna do a little
bit of an exercise where
you imitate my spoken,
you mock my spoken statement.
And then I'm gonna get you to just
imitate my melody, the notes that I sing.
Just back and forth.
You ready?
I love to sing.
I love to sing.
I am the best singer in the world.
I am the best singer in the world.
It's fun, right?
And it's like something that
you don't really think about.
You just instinctively,
intuitively can do that.
When you apply that ability to music,
to pitches that we associate
it with particular notes.
You go a long way towards realizing how
sophisticated your ear can be
without you even knowing it.
So now we're gonna do a little exercise
where you're matching my pitch.
[MUSIC]
Let's do it again.
[MUSIC]
Good,
let's try one that starts an octave lower.
[MUSIC]
[MUSIC]
Good, one more time.
[MUSIC]
[MUSIC]
So you're exercising a skill that you've
been developing since before you're born.
This is the stuff that we actually
start developing in the womb,
because we can hear as our brains and
our auditory system develops,
even in the womb.
We are listening, we are hearing.
So a big part of being able to
imitate is being able to imagine,
hear the sound without vocalizing,
without expressing it, but to imagine it.
We call that audiation.
The word audiation means
to hear in your mind.
And we all hear in our minds.
Sometimes we wish we didn't.
[LAUGH] I can hear my mom yelling at me.
I could hear my mom yelling at me when I
was a kid even when she wasn't around if
my room wasn't clean.
I could hear her voice.
So we're all able to imagine sound.
This is gonna come into play very strongly
when we get into singing harmony.
A big key to success in singing harmony
is being able to imagine the note,
imagine the part in your mind before you
even open your mouth to try to sing.
So the two components
to matching pitch and
really solidifying your
ability to identify pitch and
reproduce it and imitate is to
be able to imagine audiation and
then active listening, hearing and
then reproducing, vocalizing the pitch.
Let's do just a couple more
exercises before we move on.
[MUSIC]
[MUSIC]
That's way down at
the bottom of my range.
[MUSIC]
Really have to relax my larynx,
open up my throat and
relax all the muscles in my neck,
and really have a lot of air support.
I have to take a big breath.
[MUSIC]
And it's very hard to control
down there in those bottom notes.
Try it one more time.
[MUSIC]
[MUSIC]
Bonus round, can you identify
what kind of chord that was?
From the bottom up, it would be
[MUSIC].
Major or minor?
Major, that's right.
That was a C major.
[MUSIC]
Okay, we're gonna do one more arpeggio.
When you are skipping notes
to play the notes of a chord,
that's called an arpeggio.
Let's do one more arpeggio.
We're gonna move this one to G.
[MUSIC]
We're gonna go up.
[MUSIC]
You do it.
[MUSIC]
Now do it a capella.
[MUSIC]
Great,
so we're gonna create a little
exercise where all you're doing
is listening to the pattern,
imagining yourself singing it,
and then imitating it,
and matching the pitch.
Okay that's good work.
We are going to move
on to the next lesson.
[MUSIC]
[MUSIC]
>> Okay,
for the last part of our
Pitch Exercise Lesson or
the Mock Me Lesson we are going
to start learning the melody of
another country classic,
Will the Circle Be Unbroken.
I'm gonna play this melody and
teach it to you in two keys,
one may be more comfortable or
more doable for you than another.
So focus on whichever key is more
in your comfortable, usable range.
We have a backing track that, eventually,
you'll be able to use to sing this song
and you'll have a choice of a key of C.
[MUSIC]
Or F.
[MUSIC].
I'm gonna teach it to you
first in the key of C.
[MUSIC]
That is the melody for
Will the Circle Be Unbroken,
I wanted you to just hear the notes.
Now, I'm gonna sing them one chunk
at a time and you sing them back.
[MUSIC]
Will the circle.
Be unbroken.
By and by lord, by and by.
There's a better home a-waiting.
In the sky, lord, in the sky.
All right, now we're gonna put
each of those chunks together and
sing the whole melody of Will the Circle
be Unbroken in the key of C, ready?
One, two, three.
Will the circle be unbroken.
By and by, lord, by and by.
There's a better home a-waiting.
In the sky, lord, in the sky.
That's Will the Circle Be Unbroken
in the key of C,
now let's transpose that
melody to the key of F.
This will be a little bit out
of the comfortable register,
the range,
that I would most likely sing it in.
[MUSIC]
It's a little higher than I comfortably
sing it, but it maybe closer to
the guys key, an octave down, so.
[MUSIC]
We're gonna sing one chunk at a time.
Will the circle.
Be unbroken.
By and by, lord, by and by.
There's a better home a-waiting.
In the sky, lord, in the sky.
Great, let's put the whole thing together,
Will the Circle Be Unbroken
in the key of F.
One, two, three.
Will the circle be unbroken.
By and by, lord, by and by.
There's a better home a-waiting.
In the sky, lord, in the sky.
Great, you're on your way to singing
Will the Circle Be Unbroken.
[MUSIC]