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Cello Lessons: “Boil Them Cabbage Down”

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[MUSIC]
So now we're gonna learn
Boil Them Cabbage Down.
We'll learn the melody
with a couple variations.
This is a really popular bluegrass tune.
You could walk into any bluegrass jam, and
call this tune and
people will be able to play it with you.
At this point, you've actually learned
most of all the notes that we're
gonna play in this melody and
we're gonna play on the G string again.
But the first note of this
melody is the same first note
from Beethoven's Ode to Joy.
It's third finger on the D string,
which is an F#.
Let's find the first note.
[MUSIC]
I'm gonna play the A section melody,
and I want you to see if you can call
out the fingers of the notes that
I'm playing while I play them.
[MUSIC]
If you
said three,
three, three,
three, three,
three.
Four, four, four, four, four, four.
Three, three, three, three, three, three.
One, one, one, one, one, one.
Three, three, three, three,
three, three, three.
Four Four, four, four, four, four.
Three, three, three, one,
one, one, O, O, O, O, O, O.
Then you were correct.
Let's sing it together before we play it.
One, two, ready and.
Three, three, three, three, three, three.
Four, four, four, four, four, four.
Three, three, three, three, three, three.
One, one, one, one, one, one.
Three, three, three, three, three, three.
Four, four, four, four, four, four.
Three, three, three, one,
one, one, O, O, O, O, O, O.
Now let's play it.
The rhythm that the bow is playing is our,
Rum Jimmy rhythm.
One, two, three, four.
[MUSIC]
That is
the entire
A section.
And, actually, a lot of people kind
of only jam on the A section and
they'll just keep playing it over and
over again.
So that is the core of the tune.
However, one thing I want to
introduce you to is double stops.
What are double stops?
Double stops are when we're actually
playing two notes at the same time.
And that's gonna be a big
part of playing this melody,
when you play it through a couple times.
So let me show you what it sounds like,
and then I'll teach you
the notes that we're gonna add.
[MUSIC]
Basically
we're just
adding the open
A string for
all of these
notes but one.
When we play the fourth
finger on the D string,
we're gonna add the first
finger on the A string.
We're gonna play them at the same time.
Let's find that.
Let's get the fourth finger playing first.
And then,
while leaving the fourth finger down,
put the first string on the A string where
the B note is, our first position note.
And if you turn the bow to touch the A and
the D strings at the same time,
we'll get both sounds.
[MUSIC]
>> You'll
want to see if you can get both
notes to sound at the same volume.
So, you'll really wanna have the bow
evenly distributed on both strings.
Apart from that one double stop,
with fourth finger and first finger
on the A string, we're just gonna add
the open A to the rest of the melody.
So, let's find these double stops.
Play third finger on the D string and
open A at the same time.
[MUSIC]
Now fourth finger and
first finger on the D and A strings.
[MUSIC]
That's the hardest one.
[MUSIC]
And now we'll go Back to third finger and
the open A.
[MUSIC]
First finger and the open A.
[MUSIC]
And then the open D and open A.
[MUSIC]
I'll play these for you once and
then we'll play it together.
[MUSIC]
Let's
play
together.
Ready, go.
[MUSIC]
Very
good.
You might notice it kind of
takes twice as much weight and
energy of the bow arm to play
both strings at the same time.
So it's gonna build up
a little bit of our endurance.
[MUSIC]
[MUSIC]
Let's play the A section twice through,
once without double stops and
then once with double stops.
One, two, three, four.
[MUSIC]
Now add
the open
A.
[MUSIC]
Good.
Now let's learn the B
section of this tune.
The B section is easier, but
it is gonna give us an opportunity to
play on the lower G string a little bit.
The B section starts on first
finger on the G string.
Let's all find that note.
[MUSIC]
Do you know the name of
the pitch that we're playing?
It's one above G.
If you said H you're wrong.
One above G is actually A again because we
only go up to G when we're naming notes.
So this is an A and
you can check the intonation
of your A against your open A string.
[MUSIC]
And they should sound pretty similar.
[MUSIC]
Now that we've found that note,
let's learn this phrase.
It goes like this.
[MUSIC]
We'll
break it up and
I'll teach it to
you phrase by phrase.
Repeat after me.
[MUSIC]
Ready, go.
[MUSIC]
Can you guess which finger I'm playing
that second note, the second pitch note?
It's third finger on the G string,
which is the note B.
So if we sang the numbers we
would be singing one, three.
Let's sing that.
One, three.
Now, let's play it.
Ready? Play. [MUSIC]
Good.
The next phrase starts the same but
ends differently.
It's gonna start with
these two notes again.
One.
And then we're gonna do
a little skill pattern on the D
string that sounds like this.
[MUSIC]
Those notes are one, three, four, one.
Let's sing that together.
One, three, four, one.
Now let's play it together.
Ready?
And, one, three, four, one.
[MUSIC]
Let's put that with the beginning
of the phrase,
which starts on the G string.
And it will all sound like this.
Let's sing it together with the numbers.
[MUSIC]
One, one, three, four, one.
Let's play that together slowly.
Ready, go.
And
[MUSIC]
one, one,
three, four, one.
Good, let's put that with
the first phrase that we learned.
I'll play them both, and I want you to
sing along with the finger numbers,
and then we'll play it together.
Ready, go.
And, [SOUND] one,
three, one, one,
three, four, one..
Let's play it together.
Ready.
Play.
And one, three,
one, one,
three, four, one.
Good.
Let's do that one more time.
Ready, play.
And, one, three,
one, one,
three, four, one.
Now that's half of the B section.
The second half is gonna
start the same but
it's gonna end with the ending
from the A section.
I'll let you
hear it first
[MUSIC].
So it ends with some run jimmies and
a downward scale, from F sharp
[MUSIC]
to E to D
[MUSIC].
Let's sing the finger
numbers of this phrase,
the second half of the B section together.
Ready, sing.
And one, three, three,
three, three, one, one, one.
Let's do it again.
[SOUND] One, three,
[MUSIC].
Three, three, three, one, one, one.
Okay, let's play the whole B section now.
I'll play it, and we'll sing the finger
numbers along with my playing,
and then we'll play it together.
From the beginning of the B section.
One, two, ready, sing.
[MUSIC]
One, three.
One, one, three,
four, one, one.
[MUSIC]
three.
Three, three, three, one, one, one.
Let's play it.
[MUSIC]
One, three.
One, one, three, four, one.
One three.
Three, three, three, one, one, one.
Again, the whole thing.
One, three.
One, one, three, four, one, one.
Three, three, three,
three, one, one, one.
Let's put that together
with the A section,
we'll play the whole,
Boil Them Cabbage Down.
You may say, but Mike,
I don't remember the A section anymore.
That's okay, let's actually
just sing the A section once
together with our finger numbers again.
Let's start like this on third finger.
Three, three, three.
Three, three, three.
Four, four, four.
Four, four, four.
Three.
three, three.
Three, three, three.
One, one, one.
One, one, one.
Three, three, three.
Three.
Three, three, four, four, four, four four,
four, three, three, three, one.
One, one.
Let's do it first without
the double stops,
all the way through the melody.
One, two, one, two, ready, play.
[MUSIC]
Play the
A section
again.
[MUSIC]
B
section.
[MUSIC]
Repeat
the B
section.
[MUSIC]
Whoo!
You'll notice that both the A section and
the B section we've repeated.
That is completely like the standard
fiddle tune form that you'll
find in bluegrass.' You'll find it
in old time music, Celtic music,
klezmer music, even Arabic music.
A, A, B, B.
You repeat both sections.
That's our standard fiddle tune form, and
it's easy to remember
Because it spells AABB.
So now you know.
You can always expect two A sections,
and two B sections.
In the next video,
we'll learn the variations to this melody.
[MUSIC]