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Cello Lessons: D Major - Improvisation

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[MUSIC]
Now that you know the D major scale
in arpeggio, it's time to explore
these same notes from a creative side.
I'm going to play a couple of short
phrases using the notes we've
been playing in D major.
And I want you to play them
back exactly as you hear them.
We'll do this with the drone so
we hear all the qualities of
the different scale degrees.
[MUSIC]
Ready, play.
[MUSIC]
Okay, keep going back and forth.
I'll play a rhythm, and then you play it.
[MUSIC]
Ready go.
[MUSIC]
Here's another.
[MUSIC]
Ready play.
[MUSIC]
Here's another.
[MUSIC]
Faked you out on the ending.
Ready, play.
[MUSIC]
Very good.
Now I'll start at the top.
[MUSIC]
Ready play.
[MUSIC]
Here's another.
[MUSIC]
Ready, play.
[MUSIC]
Let's try some
phrases where there not
all in a row in this scale.
I'll try and jump around a little bit and
see if you can pick out which
notes I'm playing by ear.
[MUSIC]
Ready,
play.
[MUSIC]
Here's another.
[MUSIC]
Ready, play.
[MUSIC]
Here's another.
[MUSIC]
Ready,
play.
[MUSIC]
Here's another.
[MUSIC]
Ready,
play.
[MUSIC]
Now let me start from a note
we haven't started from yet.
[MUSIC]
That was with the third
finger on the A string.
Ready, play.
[MUSIC]
Okay.
Another note we haven't started from,
fourth finger on the D string.
[MUSIC]
Ready,
play.
[MUSIC]
Let's do two
more phrases.
[MUSIC]
Ready,
play.
[MUSIC]
Let me test you
on this last one.
[MUSIC]
Ready,
play.
[MUSIC]
Good so I want you to get used to taking
a note that you hear and knowing which
finger you need in order
to play that note.
That's called using your ear.
You can think of it as
ear-hand coordination.
Everybody's very familiar with
the idea of eye-hand coordination.
And if you read sheet music, that's
what you use when you're reading music.
But we want to start playing by ear, and
doing these call and response phrases
is a really great way to train your ear,
and connect it to your fingers.
The next step after call and response,
after we sort of gotten used
to where these notes are when
we hear them, is to improvise.
All improvising means is we're gonna take
these notes of the D major scale and
put them in any order.
All of you who are watching,
especially you,
are brilliant improvisers
already in the English language.
We all improvise in
the English language all day.
And it's because we know all
the words that we can use and
we just have done it a lot.
And so we're used to putting these
words together in new orders.
And so improvising in music
is just the same idea.
We're gonna take the seven notes
from the D major scale and
the 8th note of the octave and we're just
gonna put them in a different order.
And that's how we're going
to begin to improvise.
I'm gonna demonstrate
an improvisation using many of
the phrases that we just learned
in the call and response.
And then I'm going to let you
use the D drone backing track to
practice improvising on your own.
But let me demonstrate a little bit.
[MUSIC]
You
can even
start
to make
longer
phrases.
[MUSIC]
You can even
start incorporating
some of the rhythmic
variations we've
been practicing
into your improvisation.
[MUSIC]
As you can see,
the possibilities
really are limitless,
but we're gonna
have a good time
improvising in D major,
over the drone.
So we're always listening for intonation.
Don't use a metronome though so you can
sort of stay free from the strict beat.
And you can explore rhythms and
just find all the different sorts of
combinations of notes that you like and
you can submit a video submission.
And I'd love to hear your
improvisation in D major.
[MUSIC]