This is a public version of the members-only Multi-Style Cello with Mike Block, at ArtistWorks. Functionality is limited, but CLICK HERE for full access if you’re ready to take your playing to the next level.

These lessons are available only to members of Multi-Style Cello with Mike Block.
Join Now

Beginner
 ≡ 
Intermediate
 ≡ 
Advanced
 ≡ 
Bluegrass
 ≡ 
Jazz
 ≡ 
Classical
 ≡ 
Rhythmic & Chordal Playing
 ≡ 
30 Day Challenge
 ≡ 
+Music
 ≡ 
Video Exchange Archive
 ≡ 
«Prev of Next»

Cello Lessons: “Lullaby” by Brahms

Video Exchanges () Submit a Video Lesson Resources () This lesson calls for a video submission
Study Materials Music Theory
Lesson Specific Downloads
Play Along Tracks
Tools for All Lessons +
Metronome
Collaborations for
Submit a video for   

This video lesson is available only to members of
Multi-Style Cello with Mike Block.

Join Now

Information
 ≡ 
Course Description
 ≡ 

This page contains a transcription of a video lesson from Multi-Style Cello with Mike Block. This is only a preview of what you get when you take Cello Lessons at ArtistWorks. The transcription is only one of the valuable tools we provide our online members. Sign up today for unlimited access to all lessons, plus submit videos to your teacher for personal feedback on your playing.

CLICK HERE for full access.
X
Log In
X
[MUSIC]
Lullaby is a melody written
by Johannes Brahms in 1868.
It's very popular today and
commonly known as the cradle song.
We're gonna use this
melody to work on playing
a beautiful rich melody on
the lower strings of our cello.
And we're also gonna learn a new key,
F major.
We've earned a break after so
much A major in the previous couple tunes.
And so there's not gonna be
any extensions in this melody.
We're gonna start on the G string
with first finger and fourth finger.
I want you to repeat after me.
[MUSIC]
Ready, play.
[MUSIC]
Good.
That's a little Jimmy Run rhythm.
We're gonna do, Jimmy run, Jimmy run.
Ready?
Together and.
[MUSIC]
Good.
Then we've got a little F major arpeggio.
The third is A.
The fifth is C and we go up to F.
[MUSIC]
Let's play just those three notes,
the F major arpeggio, starting on A.
Ready, and.
[MUSIC]
Good.
Now we're gonna do
a couple scale notes down.
[MUSIC]
We're gonna go
down, up, down.
We're gonna slur two-note slurs,
up and then down.
Then we play the arpeggio and
the downward scale.
[MUSIC]
Let's play that together and.
[MUSIC]
Good.
In that phrase, when we go up
[MUSIC]
and then we lean on the D
[MUSIC]
before we get to the C.
That's a kind of ornament actually.
We're leaning on the upper
neighbor to the C.
And in classical music we
call that an appoggiatura.
[MUSIC]
Let's put everything
together that we have so far.
You can sing along the first time.
Three, four.
[MUSIC]
The reason I bring up
the appoggiatura is we always
want to lean on the appoggiature,
lean on the non-chord tone.
Let's try it together.
Ready, play.
[MUSIC]
Up,
lean.
Good.
[MUSIC]
This is the next phrase.
[MUSIC]
Same melodic rhythm as the first phase but
we're starting on G instead of A.
[MUSIC]
And we kind of throw
in a little extra G there.
So O, one, two for a B flat.
Let's play that phrase together.
Three, go.
[MUSIC]
Good.
And then we're gonna do
a little jump up again.
[MUSIC]
That's O, two,
one, O, four.
Starting down bow.
Ready?
Play.
[MUSIC]
And that ends.
[MUSIC]
One, two.
Let me play that whole second half.
Sing along with me starting
[MUSIC]
from the G run.
Ready, and.
[MUSIC]
Let's play
it together one more time.
Ready, play.
[MUSIC]
We've
got the whole
A section now.
Why don't you sing along with me once.
And because this is in three,
the feel that we're
gonna want to have,
is kind of a three and one, two.
Three and one, two, three and
one, two, three and one, two.
We're always leading from three into one,
okay?
Not every beat is equal.
So that's the feel we're looking for.
Let's play the whole A section together.
One, two, three, one, go.
[MUSIC]
Three, two, three, one,
two, three, one, two, three,
one, two, three.
[MUSIC]
Let's
play it again.
[MUSIC]
Yeah, so
keep vibrating
through this
melody.
It's gonna help the vocal
quality to have a rich vibrato.
And because we're playing so low it's
not gonna be too fast of a vibrato.
[MUSIC]
[MUSIC]
So within the feel even though
we're feeling everything one,
two, three, one, two, three.
We don't want every bar to be
the same exact lean on one.
If this was like a dance waltz,
we would want every bar to
maybe be a little more similar.
But because this is a classical melody,
we want to create a longer phrase.
And the way we do that is to
pick our battles, we pick one or
two places that we think are gonna be
the high point, the climax in our melody.
And I would say in the first phrase,
we want to lead all the way from the first
notes all the way to that
appoggiatura I told you about.
So from the beginning.
[MUSIC]
We're gonna lead all the way here.
[MUSIC]
We lean,
that's kind of the goal of
the whole first phrase.
And within that we still want the one,
two, three, one, feel.
And if we even wanted to put
one more interesting thing
in there we can kind of make the second
phrase a little bit of an echo.
[MUSIC]
Doo, doo, doo, soft.
[MUSIC]
And then we climb all the way to here.
And then actually, we can stay strong,
cuz now we're on the five chord.
[MUSIC]
We can lead there.
Those two phrases lead to that second,
B flat.
[MUSIC]
And then we can kind of dae crescendo
through the rest of the phrase.
[MUSIC]
So what that does.
If we do that then we have one big
arc through the whole A section.
And that's the kind of long phrases
that we want in a classical melody.
We don't wanna feel everything bar by bar,
that would actually make a dance tune or
a fiddle tune feel really good.
Let's play through the whole A section,
and we're gonna do that big arc all
the way to the arpeggio,
the appoggiatura, we're gonna stay big at
the beginning of the five chord, and
then we'll dae crescendo towards the end.
Together, one, two, three, one, two.
[MUSIC]
Echo.
Crescendo.
[MUSIC]
And lean, stay big.
[MUSIC]
Right there, now it starts getting softer.
[MUSIC]
Let's repeat that.
Cuz in the performance,
the A section happens twice.
Let's do it once more
without me yelling at you.
One, two.
[MUSIC]
Good.
So, we've got two A sections.
Now we're gonna play the B
section which starts strong.
[MUSIC]
We've got two low Fs and then a high F,so
we gotta get a lot of arm weight sinking
into the C string for a big, rich sound.
[MUSIC]
There's the next notes,
F, F, F, O, two, four.
[MUSIC]
That phrase is one,
four, two, four, up, four.
[MUSIC]
Let's sing that one more time,
just that part.
[MUSIC]
1, 4,
2, 4, O, 4.
Good.
Now put that with the opening S.
Sing along the first time,
then we'll play it together and.
[MUSIC]
Doo doo doo, up, down, down.
Up, down, up, down.
There's a couple two-note slurs in there.
Let's play it together,
I'll keep calling out the bowings.
Ready, and.
[MUSIC]
Up, down.
[MUSIC]
Up, down, up, down.
Let's do it again.
Doo doo doo, up,
down, up, down.
Up, down.
[MUSIC]
Good.
And the second half of this section
is gonna start the same, but
it's gonna have a different answer.
It's gonna cadence full.
[MUSIC]
Here's the new part.
[MUSIC]
It's got a nice little
turn on that B flat.
[MUSIC]
We'll slur down through that.
[MUSIC]
And then two ups.
So we can end on a nice down bow.
Let's play that.
[MUSIC]
Doo doo, doo, up, up, down, ready, play.
[MUSIC]
And because those are shorter notes,
actually what we would
also want to do is go.
[MUSIC]
Lift, lift.
[MUSIC]
Settle.
So we're gonna have two lifts
right before the last note, okay?
Let's play that section one more time.
Ready, and.
[MUSIC]
Lift.
Lift.
[MUSIC]
Settle.
Let's play the whole B section now, okay?
We've got the first ending and
the second ending.
Why don't you sing along the first time.
I really like singing along.
And then we'll play it together.
One, two, strong.
[MUSIC]
Up, down.
[MUSIC]
Up, down, retake.
[MUSIC]
Down, up, down.
Up, down.
[MUSIC]
Turn, lift, lift, end.
Let's play the B section together.
One, two, strong.
[MUSIC]
Up, down.
Up, down.
Up, down.
Retake.
[MUSIC]
Lift, end.
Good.
Because we want the whole B
section to be pretty strong, and
we don't want to wake the baby, but
it's still gotta be pretty passionate.
I'm kinda using almost my whole bow for
a lot of that B section.
And then right towards the end,
when we start to dae crescendo,
I start using less bow.
Let's play through the whole tune,
one more time,
and I want you be able to
match my crescendos and
try and even speed up your
vibrato when we play louder.
That's gonna really add to
the expressiveness, okay?
From the top, one last time.
[MUSIC]
That's how it starts.
[MUSIC]
One, two, three, one, two.
[MUSIC]
Echo.
[MUSIC]
Crescendo and lead.
Stay up, stay up.
[MUSIC]
Dae crescendo, do the whole thing again.
[MUSIC]
And
we can crescendo
in this note to
lead into the B
section.
Full bows.
[MUSIC]
Retake.
[MUSIC]
Dae crescendo,
lift, end.
Once you've sort of copied some of the
phrasing I'm doing, you will actually be
completely free to phrase things
a little differently on your own.
Maybe you'll find a different
place to lean to.
But practice with the backing track and
the performance track,
and if you don't fall asleep I look
forward to seeing your video submission.
[MUSIC]