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Cello Lessons: C Minor - Improvisation (Beginner)

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[MUSIC]
Now that we know the notes of C minor,
it's time to start exploring it on our
own terms with improvisation.
I still want you to practice
it freely with a drone,
just exploring the sounds
of the intervals and
also organizing that practice with
the guide tone improvisation.
Today, I wanna dive into the metronomic
rhythmic improvisation with you
a little bit, and we're gonna put
the metronome at quarter equals 110, okay?
The main thing I wanna start
with is call and response.
So, I'll play a phrase, and
I want you to repeat it back to me.
In rhythm.
[SOUND]
[MUSIC]
Play,
[MUSIC]
listen,
[MUSIC]
play,
[MUSIC]
listen,
[MUSIC]
play,
[MUSIC]
listen
[MUSIC]
play,
[MUSIC]
listen,
[MUSIC]
play
[MUSIC].
[MUSIC]
Let's do that one again.
[MUSIC]
Play it,
[MUSIC]
next,
[MUSIC]
play,
[MUSIC]
listen,
[MUSIC]
play,
[MUSIC]
listen,
[MUSIC]
play it,
[MUSIC]
listen,
[MUSIC]
play it,
[MUSIC]
listen,
[MUSIC]
play,
[MUSIC]
listen,
[MUSIC]
play it,
[MUSIC]
listen,
[MUSIC]
play it,
[MUSIC]
listen,
[MUSIC]
little shift,
play it,
[MUSIC]
next.
[MUSIC]
Play that,
[MUSIC]
shift, let's try
that shift one more time,
listen,
[MUSIC]
play it
[MUSIC]
let's do four more
phrases
[MUSIC]
play it, next
[MUSIC]
Play it next,
[MUSIC]
play it,
[MUSIC]
good.
If this is hard for you, go back and
keep doing these same phases and
just keep repeating it.
And we wanna work on connecting
what we're hearing to the notes and
the fingers that we would
need to play on the cello.
Also, as you go through for
the second or third times,
once you get comfortable with the notes
see if you can pay attention to my bowing.
Cuz occasionally I was slurring or
hooking bowing.
When I hook bow, that means that means
I do two downs or two ups in a row.
The last thing I want us to think
about with C minor rhythmic improv,
is the concept.
Of four bar phrases.
I would venture to say
that 95 to 99% of music
from the Western Hemisphere is
structured in four bar phrases, okay?
A lot of American music Is built on
four bar phrase chunks and we wanna
start to become comfortable improvising
phrases that fill that structure.
When we put multiple four
bar phrases together it
will actually sound very natural, okay?
So let me demonstrate
a few four-bar phrases and
then I'll let you work
on improvising as well.
So with the drone and the metronome,
I'll count the bars and
try and improvise four bar phrases,
one, two, first bar.
[MUSIC]
Four, two,
[MUSIC]
three,
[MUSIC]
Four, two, three, that was four bars.
Basically, in order to make a four bar
phrase I just have to keep playing and
then stop before the four bars are up.
Okay, that's how we'll define
the phrase is just stopping.
Like when you're talking.
The best way to finish
the sentence is to stop talking.
It's the same way with music,
the best way to finish the phrase
is just to stop playing.
Let me do a couple other
four bar phrases and
I want you to count the bars
along with me, okay?
One, two, ready, go, one,
[MUSIC]
two,
[MUSIC]
three,
[MUSIC]
four, two, three, four, good,
that was another four bar phrase.
Let's put a couple together.
[SOUND] One Two, ready, go.
[MUSIC]
One,
[MUSIC]
two,
[MUSIC]
three,
[MUSIC]
four.
Another, and one,
[MUSIC]
two,
[MUSIC]
three,
[MUSIC]
four, another,
[MUSIC]
two,
[MUSIC]
three,
[MUSIC]
four, that was just a scale up and
down, one,
[MUSIC]
two,
[MUSIC]
three,
[MUSIC]
four,
[MUSIC]
last phrase.
One,
[MUSIC]
two,
[MUSIC]
three,
[MUSIC]
four.
Okay, so you can hear I'm just
going up and down the scale,
maybe taking in a riff and repeating it.
But whatever I decide to do,
I'm gonna try and keep doing it for
that four-bar phrase.
And because we wanna make sure to
leave space at the end of the phrase.
That'll often mean that we're actually
improvising for three bars and
then we leave the last bar open, okay.
So take a week or so and really start to
get into the feeling of four bar phrases.
And while you're listening to music,
any type of music,
whether it's classical music or
fiddle tunes or pop music.
I want you to see if you can count along.
If you can count the bars and
I guarantee you your going to find four
bar phrases almost all of the time.
[MUSIC]