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Cello Lessons: Chopping: Intermediate Patterns

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[MUSIC]
After you spent a few weeks with
the beginner patterns,
let's learn a couple
of new patterns that
are a little bit more advanced.
The first one we can learn goes like this.
Note, note, chop, note,
rest, note, chop, note.
Note, note, chop, note,
rest, note, chop note.
Say that with me.
Note, note, chop, note,
rest, note, chop, note.
Note, note, chop, note,
rest, note, chop, note.
Now, the rest is a new thing in
our pattern, and, basically,
the chop [SOUND] is a forward
moving percussive sound.
The rest [SOUND] is when you move back.
And you put the bow back on
the string to mute it, but
you're not actually
creating the scratch sound.
So, this note, note,
chop, note, rest, note,
chop, note pattern,
slowly, sounds like this.
[MUSIC]
You hear there's that
rest in there where there's not a note,
but there's also not a chop.
So we're.
[MUSIC]
Let's just do that first half of
the pattern.
It's down, up, chop, up, rest.
And down, up, chop, up, rest.
Join me.
Down, up, chop, up, rest.
And down, up, chop, up, rest.
Two more times, and.
[MUSIC]
So,
that point of the rest is to
mute the string rhythmically.
If I fill in the rest of the pattern,
we have another up, chop, up.
Say up, chop, up.
Up, chop, up.
Good.
So, the whole thing down, up,
chop, up, rest, up, chop up.
Down, up, chop, up, rest, up, chop, up.
[MUSIC]
Say it first.
[MUSIC]
Rest, up, chop, up.
Down, up, chop, up, rest, up, chop, up.
Down, up, chop, up, rest, up, chop, up.
Down, up, chop, up, rest, up.
Now play it.
[MUSIC]
One thing we're gonna
add now at this intermediate level,
is we're going to damp the string for
the chop itself.
[MUSIC]
You may notice that if you chop on an open
string, you're actually [SOUND]
stopping the string at a point,
and you're actually getting a note.
If I do it right here, I'm gonna
actually hear a really faint A flat.
[SOUND] Can you hear that?
[SOUND] That's because [SOUND] if
you pitched on the opposite side of
the string,
that's actually like the equivalent of
putting the first finger down way up here.
So we actually, we wanna avoid getting
this unintended, pitched sound,
we want just a percussive sound for
the chop.
So by lightly dampening
the string with the left hand,
that's gonna get rid of that vibration.
[MUSIC]
It's really dry and
[MUSIC]
crisp that way.
[MUSIC]
So let's try dampening with the left hand
for both the chop and
the rest parts of this pattern.
It'll look and sound like this.
[MUSIC]
Let's
try it up
the scale now.
The only difference is when we're
doing the scale instead of dampening
with the hand, we're actually
just going to release the finger
from the string to keep it from vibrating.
[SOUND] When I chop,
the string comes off the fingerboard.
It will look and sound like this.
[MUSIC]
As I'm
doing this,
I can't really help
myself from sort
of moving in a sort
of dance-like
feeling because
the chop is really
about the feel.
And it's about getting your
body moving in patterns.
Getting your body in a cyclical motion for
these chop patterns.
So if you're staying super stiff and
still,
[MUSIC]
I think it's actually much harder to throw
your arm weight into the cello and
get a relaxed, fuller chop sound.
Let's do this pattern with our one,
four, one, five chords as well,
G, C, G, D, sounds like this.
[MUSIC]
Good.
The next pattern I wanna
teach you sounds like this.
[MUSIC]
Note, chop, note,
note, chop, note.
Note, chop, note, note, chop, note.
Say it with me right now.
Note, chop, note, note, chop, note.
Note, chop, note, note, chop note.
Note, chop, note, now air bow.
Note, chop, note, note, chop, note.
Note, chop, note, note, chop, note.
Down, chop, up, up, chop, up.
Down, chop, up, up, chop, up.
Down, chop, up, up, chop, up.
Say that with me.
Down, chop, up, up, chop, up.
Down, chop, up, up, chop, up.
Down, chop, up, up, chop, up.
Down, up, chop.
Now on the instrument.
[MUSIC]
Let's
do that in
the scale now.
One, two, three, and.
[MUSIC]
And in
the chord
progression,
ready go.
[MUSIC]
[MUSIC]
Last pattern I want to introduce
to you at this level is
an introductory jig pattern.
The jig pattern can take
a while to get used to.
I always feel like the jig feel,
took me years and
years to really feel comfortable with.
One of the reasons it's a little unique is
that we're actually gonna start up bow.
So the jig,
you may remember when we learned
Atholl Highlanders in the beginner
curriculum, is in the sixth eighth.
So, one, two, three, four, five, six.
One, two, three, four, five, six.
One, two, three, four, five, six.
One, two, three, four, five, six.
And the chop pattern is just note,
note, note, chop.
Note, note, note, note, note, chop.
Note, note, note, note, note, chop.
Note, note, note, note, note, chop.
Note, note.
But we're gonna start up bow.
Up, down, up, chop, up, down.
Okay, the reason we start up bow
is that the chop is a down stroke.
Up, down, up, chop, up, down.
Okay, so let's cycle that a little bit.
Up down, up chop, up down, up down, up
chop, up down, up down, up chop, up down,
up down, up chop, up down, up down, up
chop, up down, up down, up chop, up down.
Now, the instrument.
[MUSIC]
[SOUND]
Up, down,
up, chop.
Up, down, Up, down, up chop.
Up, down.
Up down, up chop.
Up, down.
Up, down, up, chop, up, down.
Let's play the scale now.
Three,
and
[MUSIC].
That's your basic jig chop
patterns starting on up bow.
Practice all these
patterns with a metronome.
You can practice them in scales and
you can just sort of improvise
chord progressions with them.
And as you get more comfortable,
work them up with the metronome.
They're harder to coordinate
at faster speeds.
But it's really just about
getting into the feel of them and
actually trying to avoid
thinking too hard on that.
[MUSIC]