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Mandolin Lessons: 7th Chords as Dominants

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[MUSIC]
So
these Seventh Chords are dominant chords.
They add, they add a little spice to our
harmony.
They add just a little tension and just a
little color to,
to spicen up the the chords.
[MUSIC]
C, G, D7.
[MUSIC]
Just sounds a little more rich
[NOISE] than plain old D.
[MUSIC]
You know, if you're just cooking with salt
and pepper, you know, you gotta have a
little garlic in there once in awhile.
So we're gonna continue on this vein.
If we were in the key of D for instance,
our one, four and five, our D, G and A.
A being the five chord it needs to become
a seven or a dominant chord.
So how do we make an A into an A7?
[SOUND] Here's your bar A that I showed
you [NOISE] earlier.
And what is the seventh note of an A
scale, A, B, C, D, E, F, G.
[MUSIC]
We're gonna add a G note to that chord.
[MUSIC]
And it's fingered like that.
[MUSIC]
Bar in the low two.
[NOISE] Third finger on the fourth fret.
[MUSIC]
C-Sharp and
second finger on the third fret.
[MUSIC]
At the G note.
So there's your A7.
We're gonna pretend we're in the key of D.
[MUSIC]
We're going into the four chord with G.
[MUSIC]
Now,
we're gonna go to the five chord of A7.
[MUSIC]
There's your B.
[MUSIC]
And back to D.
[MUSIC]
Okay?
Now, we're gonna move to the key of A.
[COUGH]
[MUSIC]
A is now the home base.
That's the root chord.
[MUSIC]
D is the four.
[MUSIC]
And E [NOISE] is the five.
[MUSIC]
So
the E chord needs to be the seventh chord.
Now a few of these.
I showed you how to bar.
The D chord up [NOISE] to the E position.
[MUSIC]
That's four, two, two, four.
[MUSIC]
Now the E chord,
the seventh note of an E scale, E, F, G,
A, B, C, D.
[MUSIC]
You need to add a D note to that chord.
[MUSIC]
And
we do that by placing our pinky right
there on the fifth fret, second string.
So this is four.
[SOUND] Two.
[SOUND] Five.
[SOUND] Four.
[MUSIC]
Beautiful little E7 chord there.
I'm gonna show you one other E7, just so
you have some options.
Cuz this one's pretty tangled, you're
using all four fingers.
[MUSIC]
Some people will have trouble with that.
Here's a two finger E7.
You'll love this.
[SOUND] First fret.
[SOUND] Open on the third string.
[SOUND] Second fret.
B on the A string.
[SOUND] And open on the E.
[MUSIC]
That's also a nice little E7.
That's just a two finger E7.
One, O, two, O.
Okay.
So again, we're in the key of A.
[MUSIC]
And we're,
we're gonna go to the fourth chord [NOISE]
which is D.
[MUSIC]
Now we're gonna to go to the five chord,
which is E.
[MUSIC]
This one [NOISE] or this one.
[MUSIC]
And back to the A.
[MUSIC]
Let's do all that again with me.
[MUSIC]
A.
Two.
Three.
Here comes the D.
[MUSIC]
Here comes the E.
[MUSIC]
And back to the A.
[MUSIC]
Let's
do this one other key, the key of C now.
[MUSIC]
So
we have our little two finger C chord
[NOISE] really simple.
We were doing the F this way.
[MUSIC]
The three finger F.
Five.
Three.
O.
One.
I'm gonna show you a new kind of F chord.
[MUSIC]
Remember,
how you can just lift things over and they
become a chord?
Look at how easy that is.
Just bring the C chord over to the next
two strings.
[MUSIC]
Two and three.
Now if you want [NOISE] you can let the A
string ring open.
[SOUND] The second string.
Or you can bar that.
[MUSIC]
At the third fret.
[MUSIC]
So, C chord [NOISE] over to an F.
[MUSIC]
Again,
we're only playing the bottom three
strings.
Watch my right hand.
[SOUND] I'm stopping right at that E
string [NOISE] cuz we wouldn't want that
to ring open for that chord.
[MUSIC]
C.
[MUSIC]
Sometimes, though that's,
that I curl this, this finger over so that
it mutes.
[MUSIC]
Or
I use my right hand, so I just don't hit
that E string.
[MUSIC]
Now, G7.
[MUSIC]
Remember, this one?
From this G to make it into A7, you have
the second fret and the first fret.
[SOUND] That's your G7.
[MUSIC]
And we come back to C.
[MUSIC]
So
anytime you're going to the five cord
[NOISE] it can be a dominant.
[MUSIC]
Or seventh chord.
[MUSIC]
And it pulls, beautifully.
[MUSIC]
There's your tension and release.
[MUSIC]