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Mandolin Lessons: Fisher's Hornpipe

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[MUSIC]
All right.
It's time for Fisher's Hornpipe now.
This is a tune I recorded with my good
buddy Chris Deely a while back.
And I don't think I'll be showing you that
version with all it's crazy variations and
rhythmic displacement and harmonic
madness.
We're gonna stick with the old time
version here for now.
And this again has a couple of moves in it
you'll be able to use in many,
many places.
We're building our little repertoire of,
of of bluegrassy, fiddle tuney riffs.
That we will then use in many ways
throughout the course.
So this tune has a, has chords that change
rather quickly.
D, G, just to like two beats on each
chord.
[MUSIC]
And that,
[NOISE] that manifests itself melodically
in the,
in the actual melody you're,
you're moving from [NOISE] from a D to a
G, a D to a G.
And so it's got to kind of twisty, turny
feeling to the fingers.
[MUSIC]
G.
[MUSIC]
D.
[MUSIC]
G.
[MUSIC]
D.
[MUSIC]
G.
[MUSIC]
D.
[MUSIC]
A.
You know, so you just have to be sort of
[NOISE] if that's tricky for you.
[MUSIC]
Break it down.
[MUSIC]
And
just cycle that [NOISE] so you get those
fingers to, to make those moves.
[MUSIC]
So that's the whole A section and that
repeats.
And the B section starts with a trill.
[MUSIC]
I mean a triplet.
[MUSIC]
There's a couple trills and triplets all
through that.
Again, this being an Irish tune in its
origins.
It would be normal for it to have a lot of
that.
So it starts with a triplet from C-sharp
[NOISE] chromatically up to E.
[MUSIC]
This is another moment where we play
the triplet down, up, down, up.
And the next note would, we, we have to
play is an up also, so
that we get back on the down beat on a
down stroke.
So the triplet exist down up, down, up,
up, down.
So there's two notes here.
Triplet, two notes.
Down, up, down, up, up, down.
[MUSIC]
Now that's a pull.
[MUSIC]
A pull from the G [NOISE]
to the F-sharp [NOISE] and up on the E.
[MUSIC]
And
in that moment [NOISE] our hand doesn't
change.
It's just continuing to do the back and
forth.
And the extra note is occurring because of
the pull.
[MUSIC]
So slow that down.
[MUSIC]
And make it into an exercise.
[MUSIC]
So
that you get really comfortable with it.
Going back to the triplet, lead into the
B.
[MUSIC]
Another trill.
I mean, another triplet.
[MUSIC]
Chromatic.
I put all four fingers together for that.
Pinky on the D.
[SOUND] Third finger on the C-sharp.
Second finger on the C.
[NOISE] First finger on the B.
And the triplet occurs on these first
three notes.
[MUSIC]
And then we're into an up.
So it's down, up, down, up.
[MUSIC]
And another up on the G.
[MUSIC]
So this is one of those
rare moments when you have two ups in a
row because of the triplet.
[MUSIC]
So
our hand has to crunch together [NOISE]
and
then open back up for the normal position.
[MUSIC]
Open.
[MUSIC]
Triplet.
[MUSIC]
Pull.
[MUSIC]
Another triplet.
[MUSIC]
Open.
[MUSIC]
All right.
Let's try it with the guit, with the
guitar man.
[MUSIC]
Trip.
[MUSIC]
Pull.
[MUSIC]
Another triplet.
[MUSIC]
Triplet.
[MUSIC]
Pull.
[MUSIC]
All right.
There's the old vicious arm pipe.
[MUSIC]
[MUSIC]
Okay,
now we'll play the chords to Fisher's
Hornpipe.
I'm gonna give you a couple of new chords
here now.
As I was saying the chords to this change
rather quickly D, G, B, G.
So, rather go from this kind of bluegrass
D always to this one.
Bluegrass G, which is a pretty far jump.
I wanna ask you to just take this D chord
over to the next two low strings,
and voila, it is a G chord.
And it's, it's, often barred.
The middle two strings a barred.
I can do that with the tip of my second
finger, so I kinda cheat.
If you have big wide fingers you can do
that.
So this makes going from D to G really
easy.
[MUSIC]
Now there's an E7 right here,
and I love to find chords that are the
nearest to the one I just played, and
there couldn't be anything nearer to this
G than this E7,
because all you're doing is bringing the,
the G note up to G-sharp.
You're at four, six, and five, from the
low strings.
And again, you're muting the top string,
you're not playing that at all.
So that's our new E7.
Just to keep things in perspective, it was
born out of this E.
It came from that E chord, and when you
turn that E chord into an E7,
it's like that.
These are the kind of things that are
sometimes hard to see when you just get
a chord book and you see a bunch of E
chords there and you're like, oh, okay,
that's an E chord, and that's an E chord,
well that's an E7, but
to know why, and to know, sort of, what
the mother chord is, it grew out of.
I think is really essential to to
understanding the instrument in
a more complete way.
So the first part of this tune.
D.
G.
D.
G.
E7.
A.
That's where we'll go to the bluegrass A.
[MUSIC]
And then we go back D, A, D.
And the B section starts on an A chord, D
chord, A chord.
It stays and I'll go down to this G chord.
Again, because it's the same shape.
I like to maintain my hands as close to
the same shape as they are,
and then we're back to the bluegrass D and
the bluegrass A.
So let's kick it off here with the
Fisher's Hornpipe rhythm section.
>> A one, two, three.
>> D, G, D, G, D, G.
[MUSIC]
E7, A.
[MUSIC]
[MUSIC]
A, B,
A, G, D,
A, D.
[MUSIC]
Nice chunky sound.
Low strings mainly.
[MUSIC]
All right.
Now, this is the point where I'd love for
you to send me a video.
Just went through four different tunes.
Cuckoo's Nest Red Haired Boy, Salt Creek,
and Fisher's Hornpipe.
And many of them have the triplets, and
the trills.
So I'd love you to just pick one that
appeals to you,
and let's see how you're doing on it.
I'd love to hear you play this thing.
We'll do our best to take it to
the next level.
[MUSIC]