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Mandolin Lessons: Using Target Notes - Liberty

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[MUSIC]
>> Let's now take a look at Liberty and
to so, do some of the same concepts.
Nice simple little fiddle tune.
[MUSIC]
But it can be so much more.
[MUSIC]
Another concept to always keep in mind is
what is the chord that's happening at the
moment that you are in.
So, from the beginning we're in D on this
[NOISE] Liberty.
[MUSIC]
D chord.
[MUSIC]
This is all D.
[MUSIC]
And this is now in G.
[MUSIC]
And now this is back to [NOISE] D.
[MUSIC]
And now A.
[MUSIC]
And back to D.
[MUSIC]
So whatever variations we do, for
instance, what's really hip about a tune
like this is you can throw in
arpeggios of the D chord.
So, instead of [NOISE] you can simply fill
it out.
[MUSIC]
And that's a D arpeggio.
[MUSIC]
Those are simply the notes of the D chord.
[SOUND] F-sharp, D [NOISE] and A.
[MUSIC]
Now it's a G chord.
[MUSIC]
So there's the notes of the G chord.
[SOUND] The G.
[SOUND] The D.
[SOUND] And the B.
[SOUND] You're just outlining it.
[MUSIC]
Now turn around [NOISE] can be many
things.
[MUSIC]
I'm just gonna do a bunch of turn arounds.
[MUSIC]
Okay.
So that's the A section of Liberty.
Let's go to the B section now.
[MUSIC]
A.
[MUSIC]
Starts on a D.
[MUSIC]
A.
[MUSIC]
And back to D.
[MUSIC]
So I might start,
since you're heading up to this A note.
[SOUND] The double A note where you slide
[NOISE] up on the third string.
[SOUND] To the seventh fret.
I might do a triplet on the way up.
[MUSIC]
Chromatically from F-sharp [NOISE] to A.
[MUSIC]
And instead of stopping.
[MUSIC]
I might play.
[MUSIC]
Simply
playing three notes, instead of two.
[MUSIC]
Fills it out,
so you then have a continuous string of
eighth notes.
[MUSIC]
And
instead of stopping, [NOISE] we can play.
[MUSIC]
Again filling,
it in with a simple little D note.
[MUSIC]
Makes it feel like we're adding a lot more
notes, but we actually aren't.
[MUSIC]
Again,
target notes are always [NOISE] gonna get.
[MUSIC]
You wanna get to that F-sharp.
And we want to get back [NOISE] to this A.
[MUSIC]
And we want to get to this E, but
there's many ways to get there.
[MUSIC]
Even something as simple as that.
Instead of [NOISE] A and F-sharp.
[MUSIC]
I played A [NOISE] and G-sharp.
[MUSIC]
And
that gave it a tiny bit of chromaticism.
[MUSIC]
A little bit of diss, dissonance but
it resolves so quickly that our ear
adjusts and says, oh, yeah.
That's fine.
[MUSIC]
Check that one out.
[MUSIC]
Instead of,
[NOISE] instead of [NOISE] coming down
from the F-sharp to the D.
I went [NOISE] F-sharp [NOISE] F and back
to F-sharp.
Again, introducing just a hint of
chromaticism.
[MUSIC]
Here it comes again.
[MUSIC]
Instead of the D, [NOISE] I went for
the E-flat.
[MUSIC]
But again,
everything is centering around this E
note.
So, [NOISE] it serves the same function.
[MUSIC]
It just introduces a slightly different
color to the thing.
So, I hope that opens a tiny little window
for you into the concept
of creating your own variations and I
encourage you to, to do this yourself.
Learn some of mine, but then under,
the understand it as a sort of global way
of thinking about in proposition.
So now were gonna play, I'll play Liberty
with the backing tracks and
I'm gonna try and toss some of this things
in.
And again, I'm improvising, but I'm not
really improvising.
[LAUGH] You know, this is the, the sort of
trick with this, with this way of
improvising on a fiddle tune where you're
still kind of hearing the melody.
You still have some structure to build on.
You're not just stringing random notes
together.
There's some consciousness about it.
But even I don't know necessarily exactly
what's gonna come out.
So here we go with a little bit of
Liberty.
>> One, two, three.
[MUSIC]
All right.
Okay.
Now, it's your turn.
I'm gonna ask you to send in a little
variations on one of, one of these tunes.
Either Golden Slippers or Liberty and show
me what you're doing with it.
I really wanna hear what kind of ideas
you're coming up with and
how you're approaching it.
And hopefully, I can help you out with
that.
So time for you to send in a video to me
now.
So, be brave.
Just dive in.
Follow your ear.
Follow your heart.
Do something that sounds pretty.
Simple, keep it simple.
[MUSIC]