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Mandolin Lessons: Turnaround Licks 1-5-1

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[MUSIC]
Okay.
As we start to think about soloing,
another thing to think about is your turn
around licks.
And these are happen in almost every tune
in Bluegrass.
And it's that moment at the end of at the
end of a phrase, end of a verse, end of
a chorus where typically the chords are
[NOISE] one, [NOISE] five, [NOISE] one.
[MUSIC]
Sometimes they happen quicker.
[MUSIC]
One, five, one.
Where sometimes it's 5 [NOISE] 1.
But it's that moment harmonically where
the chord changes are coming back to one,
going back to home.
And if we look at a tune like Salt Creek
which we just spent some time on.
[MUSIC]
It's this moment.
[MUSIC]
Okay.
[MUSIC]
And so,
that's the moment where sorta the most
creative juice can happen.
So I'm gonna, I'm gonna just look at that
one moment in this piece, for instance.
We'll play the melody real straight.
[MUSIC]
So that's it.
[MUSIC]
And
what I'm gonna do is I'm gonna give you a
whole bunch of ways of dealing with that,
that sorta moment in the musical structure
of that tune.
So, what, what I just played.
[MUSIC]
Here's another one.
[MUSIC]
Here's another.
[MUSIC]
I used the C
natural that time giving it kinda bluesy
effect.
[MUSIC]
Okay.
Here's another.
[MUSIC]
Okay.
I'm gonna avoid now.
[MUSIC]
I'm not gonna start the riff with that
anymore.
I'm gonna start by coming up.
[MUSIC]
From the open a string.
[MUSIC]
But again,
it still functions the same way.
[MUSIC]
Or, so now we have kind of a new way
of approaching that moment in time and
improvisation.
We're gonna start a riff by walking up the
A scale.
So let's look at a bunch of different ways
of just dealing with it from that
perspective.
[MUSIC]
Putting
stops in your melodic ideas can really
give them shape, you know, so
that we're not continuously playing eighth
notes all the time.
[MUSIC]
You know,
one way to just think creatively is okay,
let me just break this phrase up.
[MUSIC]
Or.
[MUSIC]
Or the, the stop can go anywhere.
[MUSIC]
These are just
different conceptual things for you to
begin to build your own little riffs.
But a good starting place would be to go
ahead and
learn all those ones I just showed you.
And that'll give you a little vocabulary
to work with.
[MUSIC]