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Mandolin Lessons: Sweet Georgia Brown

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[MUSIC]
Hi there, Sweet Georgia people.
We're gonna do a little Sweet Georgia
Brown now,
and we've done the chords to it.
Spent a little bit of time on that.
I hope you've reviewed those,
cuz they're gonna be crucial to a lot of
what I will talk about.
When it comes to playing this melody and
and improvising on it.
So I'll start by just playing it exactly
as it's written, which is almost
a little bit odd, because a tune like
this, when you're talking about swing.
That's what it's all about, is how you
phrase the melody and
how you twist and turn things and
syncopate things so
that they, so that they have what we call
swing.
But of course, I like to learn a tune
straight up the way it's written.
Now, there's also a problem with a lot of
jazz fake books in that you'll
find versions of a tune, especially a tune
like this, written many different ways.
Because there is no definitive version of
a tune like this cuz it's been done so
much that there is no there, there I'm
afraid.
But we like to get started somewhere.
So, I'm gonna play exactly what's on this
page or I'm gonna attempt to.
And right off the bat, you'll notice it's
written just straight coordinates,
first two bars.
You know, nothing is, is really
anticipated or swung.
So, it's very square.
But it sounds cool, I mean, I'm, I'm not
having a problem with it.
So one, two, one, two, three, four.
[MUSIC]
Second line.
[MUSIC]
Back to the top.
So that's pretty much what's there.
Of course, I've added a couple of little
double stops here and
there just to give you a tiny sense of the
chords.
So more than anything that you might know
where you are.
So that's what's here and as you can hear,
it's just very straight.
Now, I am playing the notes rather short.
Just to give it a little swing, you know?
Rather than playing.
[MUSIC]
You know,
that's playing each note really long.
I'm playing them short so I can give it a
little.
[MUSIC]
Now,
that's just gonna give it a nice swing.
Now, the, when the.
Now, how do you do that?
If it's a fretted note, it's real easy you
simply lift up the left finger, but
on an open string, I'm using the left hand
to damp.
So just that opening bar, it's D note and
then damp, and then E, F-sharp.
You simply lift, and then a last D note.
Excuse me.
Let's try all of that again.
Ooh!
[LAUGH] That's the most fun I've
had all day.
[MUSIC]
Yeah, so
I'm playing all these notes real short.
Now, the third bar.
[MUSIC]
Cuz that's one, two,
three and four and one, two, and three and
four and.
[MUSIC]
And
I'm pretty much adhering to my concept of
pick direction here.
D, B, D, D.
Down, up, down, up, down, up, down, up.
So it's down, up, down, up, down, up,
down, up.
[MUSIC]
Oops.
Down, up, down, up, down, up, down, up.
Okay.
[SOUND] Now that's, that note's written
long, to sustain into the, fourth bar.
[MUSIC]
Okay, fair enough.
[MUSIC]
Second line, of the tune.
[MUSIC]
All right.
Third line.
[MUSIC]
I like to tremolo here, and
I also like to hammer into that tremolo to
A note fourth line down, from a G-sharp.
So I'm playing a the next to the last bar
of the third line.
Up the neck.
[MUSIC]
In preparation for that.
So I'm starting that C on my second
finger.
C. [MUSIC] D.
C.
D.
A, slide from, or hammer from G-sharp to
A.
[MUSIC]
Or it could be G natural to A.
Either one works.
[MUSIC]
Now you're saying well there's other notes
in there I hear him playing a chord.
That's right.
[MUSIC]
When I get to this D note,
I just go ahead and play a D7, which is C,
F-sharp, and D, 5-4-5.
[MUSIC]
Oops, I hear some harmony there too.
On this D note over the G chord.
So I'm now one, two, three, four, five,
six lines down.
I'm holding a B, a low B note under that.
[MUSIC]
Actually I strum on the downbeat,
I strum the chord.
Just a B and a D.
And let it ring.
Then I strum it again at the second bar of
that line and
you now have a B, a D and an A ringing.
Now on this D note, I'm strumming B, F and
D, 4-3-5 for that D note.
That's all part of a G7, just slight
different manifestations of a G7.
Starting at the beginning of that line.
[MUSIC]
So here, on this A note.
[MUSIC]
Line seven.
I like to hear the whole D-minor chord
there.
[MUSIC]
So again.
[MUSIC]
Strumming primarily on the downbeat.
So it's a D, F, A.
7-3-0 for the A note, line seven, first
bar.
[SOUND] Then here.
[MUSIC]
On this A7,
I'm playing C-sharp with that G note.
Just introducing that C-sharp underneath
on the low string.
And it gives you, a little more of a sense
that there's an A7 chord out there.
[MUSIC]
It all repeats.
Then, I start this last line, line eight,
with my second finger and I stay in
position.
[MUSIC]
You can play that whole thing up there.
Two, four, I'm sorry, second finger, third
finger for the D, first finger for the F.
[SOUND] Third finger for the A.
[MUSIC]
Now here I'm gonna introduce some slides.
[MUSIC]
Sorry.
[MUSIC]
Backwards slide when you hit that D.
[MUSIC]
To that open A.
I like to slide backwards.
[MUSIC]
Then G, C,
A when you hit that A, you slide back as
well.
[MUSIC]
And the first bar, line eight.
[MUSIC]
I like to slide into that A.
[MUSIC]
So
it's C, A, with a slide, backwards slide,
and then ending on F.
[MUSIC]
[MUSIC]
>> Okay.
So, we're not improvising yet, we're still
just playing the melody.
But gosh, darnit, there's so many ways
this thing can be played, right?
[MUSIC]
So all I'm doing is displacing things.
I'm just putting things anticipated or
delayed.
[MUSIC]
So instead of,
[MUSIC]
straight quarters,
I take the last two notes,
[MUSIC]
and I just make eighth notes out of them.
[MUSIC]
So the second bar.
[MUSIC]
Both of those sets of notes could be made
into eighth notes instead a quarters,
instead of.
[MUSIC]
You end up with.
[MUSIC]
Right.
[MUSIC]
So
this D high D note, I love to slide into
that.
[MUSIC]
What's written is this.
[MUSIC]
So what if we go.
[MUSIC]
D,
A, and I'll do an F natural to E, pull
off.
[SOUND]
Okay?
[MUSIC]
So, second line down.
[MUSIC]
I added two F notes.
[MUSIC]
Now,
2nd bar of the second line into a deeper
anticipation.
[MUSIC]
So here's the beat.
[MUSIC]
So
everything gets anticipated after that A
note.
[MUSIC]
Okay, so it's one, two, three, four.
[MUSIC]
Okay, that's a very cool thing to do.
[MUSIC]
So
now we're anticipating every, everything
starting at the C7.
One, two, three, four.
[MUSIC]
At third bar, I come back in time.
First note is on the beat,
everything after that is a sixteenth
anticipation to itself, to what's written.
One, two, three, and.
[MUSIC]
Okay, so this is a hell day, you know,
what can it be?
Can add a C note to it that gives it
harmony.
We already talked about sliding into it.
But what else can it be?
[MUSIC]
Okay, so I'm playing G sharp.
[MUSIC]
And then the A.
[MUSIC]
Mm da da da mm da da da, 'kay.
[MUSIC]
Now the last bar of that line, let's call
it an E minor to an A7, although we
decided not to play the E minor.
We decided to just play it as an A7 whole
bar,
if we were trying by line 4 now, playing
pickups into it.
[MUSIC]
2nd bar, 3rd bar here.
[MUSIC]
I'm changing the melody now,
G-E-A with a slide into that A.
I've just heard it that way so many times
that I wanna, I wanna do it.
What can I say?
So this A note over the F chord is just an
opportunity.
It's a held note so.
You can just hang out there and do any
darn thing you want.
[MUSIC]
'Kay, now, I'm waiting to come in until
after the beat.
One two three and.
[MUSIC]
Right?
I'll do it again.
One, two, three, and one.
One.
One.
Now, coming into the G7, which is line,
one-two-three-four-five-six.
I'm wanting pick up notes into that D
note.
[MUSIC]
'Kay.
Let me review, I'm playing pick up notes
of.
[MUSIC]
C to C-sharp coming into the D note.
One, two, three.
[MUSIC]
So,
sometimes I'm anticipating and sometimes
not.
And that also creates a certain amount of
tension and disruption that's,
that's very cool for the listener.
They don't know, when I'm gonna play the
melody, and
it creates a certain amount of tension.
Sometimes you're surprised that the melody
note comes early,
other times you're like where's the,
where's the, there it is.
You know?
So, again, we're not changing the note
choices,
we're just changing the placement.
One, two, three.
One, two, three.
[MUSIC]
You
can even play a game and say gosh, how
long can a I let a note not be played.
One, two, three.
[MUSIC]
I mean,
this is why they called it ragtime, right?
Cause they were raggin' the classics.
They were displacing stuff, and that gave
it a shimmy kinda fit so
well with the African drumming, that you
have jazz is born.
Now, we're at line seven.
The D minor, again you got this
[INAUDIBLE] note.
[SOUND]
Well, what else can it be?
[MUSIC]
Let's just work on that.
[MUSIC]
Okay,
so I played the G-Sharp leading into the
A.
Again, as just a what would you call it,
dramatic half-step thing.
[MUSIC]
That time I played the A first.
And I played the G-sharp on the downbeat.
[MUSIC]
And
now I'm playing multiple G notes, instead
of.
[MUSIC]
I'm playing G, G, E, A.
Again, it just gives it a little flair.
[MUSIC]
Gosh darn,
these things could be almost anywhere,
right?
One two three and.
[MUSIC]
Again,
not playing on the downbeat, make
something happen.
Here it is again, one, two, three.
And, on the down beat.
[MUSIC]
Not.
[MUSIC]
Last line.
Line eight, I guess it is.
The F.
[MUSIC]
One, two, three and.
[MUSIC]
That's what's written.
[MUSIC]
One, two, three, four.
[MUSIC]
One, two, three, and.
[MUSIC]
Just doubling the notes.
[MUSIC]
Another way.
[MUSIC]
Now, choking up at the G7.
[MUSIC]
I'm playing the G.
Now C to A, instead I play A-Flat, and
at the very last minute, I choke it to an
A-natural.
That's gonna give you the feeling of the
blues.
Right?
That's the, just what it is.
You can't bend on these instruments, but
you can pretend you are, right?
[MUSIC]
I like playing the descending notes down.
[MUSIC]
E, E-flat,
leading me into the downbeat, at the top
of the piece again.
It's what the chord guys are doing, why
can't we, right?
So here's that last line one more time
with these double notes.
[MUSIC]
Sorry, one more time.
[MUSIC]
So
at the G7, I play G, A, A, A, C, A, G, F.
[MUSIC]
[MUSIC]
So
this will give you some different ways of
playing this darn thing, melodically.
Apparently, it really left the haven't
left the melody yet too much.
We've added a couple of notes here and
there, and sliding in, sliding out.
A couple chromatic, a couple of melodic
variations, but
we're still pretty much in the tune.
We haven't gone up an octave yet either,
which I would always recommend that you
learn the whole tune up.
[MUSIC]
Wow, that one almost got away from me.
[MUSIC]
Should do it there.
[MUSIC]
I'll play the whole tune with doubles.
[MUSIC]
Just gives you another version.
[MUSIC]
Sometimes I
purposely like to play it in different
positions just to challenge myself.
[MUSIC]
You know, can I shift?
[MUSIC]
Appropriately.
[MUSIC]
You know, much easier to play it up here.
[MUSIC]
But, I sometimes will throw
myself a curve like that, or I'll go up
here and start it with a pinky at the 12.
[MUSIC]
Right, just to.
[MUSIC]
And it'll teach your ear, you know.
[MUSIC]
It'll,
it'll teach your your melodic mind to be
more in, in alignment with your fingers.
So that, I mean this is a melody that you
know so
well, that it's almost like Mary Had a
Little Lamb.
And, and that's the kinda stuff you should
practice in a bunch of positions,
because then it's really you're, you're
singing it in your mind,
and you're trying to find the notes.
And by doing that you teach your fingers
to play what your mind is hearing.
And so, as you improvise, you begin to
break
into those places, where you're hearing
something in your head and
you can't seem to find it on the
instrument.
Well, and this will be a,
this will be a tool that you'll this will
help open up those pathways.
To connect the brain to the fingers, I'm
sure.
So where were we?
So now we're gonna bust out.
We're done with the melody.
We played it up on octave.
You guys can find it.
I think if you watch me do it there,
that'll be helpful.
We're definitely into intermediate to
advanced stuff now.
So dealing with these chords, D7.
[MUSIC]
First thing I do is arpeggiate them.
[MUSIC]
You know, the world of D7, what is it?
[MUSIC]
It's D with a C natural.
[MUSIC]
What I
like to be able to do is start from any of
the notes off the arpeggio.
[MUSIC]
Start from the third.
[MUSIC]
It sends me up to the next note.
[MUSIC]
Of the arpeggio.
[MUSIC]
Start at the A.
[MUSIC]
Start at the C.
[MUSIC]
All those boxes,
those positions that you discover.
[MUSIC]
Will be.
[MUSIC]
A little geometric shapes that you will
then use to create melodies.
You know, and they will give you different
positions to play out of,
different ways of seeing D7, you know, not
just seeing it as a.
[MUSIC]
Something you start on a root,
you walk up, because you studied your
arpeggios.
It's more of teaching your fingers to see
shapes.
[MUSIC]
G7.
[MUSIC]
C.
[MUSIC]
F.
[MUSIC].
A.
[MUSIC]
D7.
[MUSIC]
G7.
[MUSIC]
I mean, we're playing Woody's Rag at that
point, right?
[MUSIC]
With the C natural, G7.
[MUSIC]
C7.
[MUSIC]
F.
[MUSIC]
What did I do?
F.
I simply played.
[MUSIC]
Parts of an F triad.
[MUSIC]
That was fifth in raw, fifth in root.
[MUSIC]
That was third and fifth.
[SOUND] Then this was fifth in root.
[MUSIC]
This was third and fifth.
[MUSIC]
Then I transformed it into an A7.
I kept the A.
[MUSIC]
And
simply added the C sharp on top cuz I was
in A7.
So my perspective of this A note changed
from it being from.
[MUSIC]
The third of an F.
[MUSIC]
To the root.
[MUSIC]
Of an A.
Okay, let's go back.
[MUSIC]
That's all D7.
[MUSIC]
I'm sliding into those thirds.
[MUSIC]
I love
this little chromatic thing that can
happen between D to C.
[MUSIC]
Then we're in G7.
[MUSIC]
One,
one way to practice a tune like this is to
start on the roots of all of the chords,
just as a, just as a starting point.
[MUSIC]
Then start on the right.
[MUSIC]
Root of G.
[MUSIC]
C.
[MUSIC]
F.
[MUSIC]
G.
[MUSIC]
D minor.
[MUSIC]
A7.
[MUSIC]
D minor.
[MUSIC]
A7.
[MUSIC]
F.
[MUSIC]
Okay.
You know, I'm gonna deal with that last
line a little bit later.
Let's, let's stay in the flow of this.
I'm, I'm trying to create licks that start
on the root, right?
That's what I was doing just then.
Now, I'm gonna create melodic fragments
that start on the third of each of
the chords.
So in the first chord, it's a D7.
We're gonna start on an F sharp.
[MUSIC]
That's the Woody's Rat, right?
G7.
[MUSIC]
C7.
[SOUND] Start on an E.
[MUSIC]
F.
[MUSIC]
It's the melody.
[MUSIC]
A7.
[MUSIC]
D7.
[MUSIC]
And,
and another way to think of this is you
don't necessarily have to start every
riff on the, on the third but use that
third as the kind of pivot note around
which you're gonna, you're gonna create
things during that chord.
So in D7, we're kinda using F sharp as,
you know, yes, I'll start there.
[MUSIC]
G7.
[MUSIC]
You know,
we, we slide into the B, but we use a G.
[SOUND] And the F just to give a, some
kind of fun melodic thing.
[MUSIC]
[MUSIC]
Now the D minor.
[MUSIC]
What's cool about is is that every note,
all on each chord, elicits you to go
somewhere with it.
You know, the F natural.
[MUSIC]
And I want to go to the C sharp for
the A, but it's such a natural lead down.
[MUSIC]
[MUSIC]
The F, if you go up,
it chromatically wanted me to go to the A.
And we're on the last fragment.
[MUSIC]
Then
you do the same thing using the fifth of
every chord.
And you do the same thing using the
seventh of every chord, so on.
On the fifth of a D would be an A, right?
[MUSIC]
G7.
[MUSIC]
C7.
[MUSIC]
F.
[MUSIC]
G
[MUSIC]
[MUSIC]
D minor.
That's the melody, it's the A note.
[MUSIC]
Okay.
Let's go on.
Okay.
So, this is homework, you know, very,
very, you know, good stuff to do.
It'll totally open up what a D arpeggio
looks like,
right now it looks like this,
[MUSIC]
at best.
So now we're gonna make it look like this,
[MUSIC]
and then like this.
[MUSIC]
And then like this.
And you'll really get comfortable,
you know, with all four of those ways of
playing the same set of notes.
Alright.
Last line.
F, E, E flat, D.
That's all chromatic, right?
What a lot people do during this moment is
simply play an F the whole time,
which is valid.
It gets you through.
[MUSIC]
You
can just be in F the whole time and let
the chords change around you.
Okay.
[MUSIC]
Just play F pentatonic,
[MUSIC],
and you'll survive.
[MUSIC]
Cause every one of those notes changes its
sound based on what chord is happening at
that moment.
And you're starting on F, and you're
trying to end on F, so
F-ness is where you are.
It's where you start, and it's where you
wanna end up.
So all that stuff that moves around you,
just does, and it's gonna be okay.
But we can take it a step deeper in, if
you wish, and
actually try to outline each of these
chords.
So it is a chromatic thing, so
I recommend closed position stuff because
that's so easy to move.
[MUSIC]
Sorry.
[MUSIC]
[MUSIC]
[MUSIC]
So recycling those bars,
whole last line here.
[MUSIC]
And that would
be a good thing to put down on tape.
[MUSIC]
G7, C7, F.
[MUSIC]
Here we go again.
[MUSIC]
F, E7, E flat 7, D7, G7, C7, F.
[MUSIC]
I just keep going.
Give yourself a good 30 minutes of that.
[LAUGH]
[MUSIC]
So that's how I went.
[MUSIC]
I went up on the F.
[MUSIC]
But
backwards on the E7, simply by moving the
finger backwards.
To the next note, which would be part of
the E7 chord.
[MUSIC]
I outlined it.
Then, the next chord is an E flat.
I simply move that finger back, and it's
going to be part of an E flat chord,
happens to be the third.
And then I'm gonna move, do the same with
this note, move it back.
And it's gonna now be the third of D.
I move this back a half step and it's
gonna be nice for the G7.
[MUSIC]
[MUSIC]
Okay.
So much can happen during this little
world.
[LAUGH], I hope this gives you a tiny
glimmer into what's possible.
It's just an attempt to open the door for
you and
give you a starting point, of course.
Transcribing solos is still, there's
nothing better than that.
If you can figure out a way to capture
what I've done,
a couple of licks here and there, that's
great.
But certainly go back to your favorite
recordings of, of a tune like this.
And, you know, even if you don't
transcribe somebody's whole solo,
at least grab the bits that are really
juicy from your standpoint and go wow,
that was so cool, just the way he started
his solo,
the opening phrase or the way he dealt
with that turnaround at the end,
or got that D minor to A7 stuff was really
neat.
Let me go and grab that.
Slow down, using amazing slow down,
whatever, one note at a time.
You know, it's the best, and try to get
every little inflection off
of whatever instrument it is and you'll,
and you'll bring that to the party.
No question about it.
Okay, I hope this had been helpful.
[LAUGH]
Sweet Georgia Brown.
I'll got out with a little blowing on it.
[MUSIC]
[MUSIC]
[MUSIC]
[MUSIC]
[MUSIC]
[MUSIC]
[MUSIC]
[MUSIC]
[MUSIC]
[MUSIC]
All right folks.
Ready to play a little B-ball?
Sweat Georgia Brown.
Here we go.
You looking at the chart I hope.
This is our circle of fifths, all right,
we're gonna go around the horn.
D7.
[MUSIC]
Da, da, da, da, da, da, da, da,
leads us to G7 cuz it's the five of G7.
[MUSIC]
Bep beh bep bo, C7,
leads us, all the way, back to the key of
F,
which is really the home of this tune.
[MUSIC]
D7.
It's a weird thing cuz it starts on the D7
which is a 5, of the 5, of the 5.
[MUSIC]
I'll get to that later.
E-minor, A7, D-minor, F7 the chromatic.
F, F, D, D, E-flat, E, G, C, F.
Woo, lotta changes, huh?
Let's go over that.
So I don't have my circle of fifths with
me here, but if I did,
you'd see a big C at the top then you'd
see a G7, and then you'd see a D7.
Okay, D7, G7, C7, and then you see F right
about there and
this is actually the key we're in, but we
start the piece all the way back here,
we play the 5 of the, the D7 is the 5 of
G7,which is the 5 of C7,
which is the 5 of 1, which is F.
And that's the key we're in.
You can find this in your curriculum
[LAUGH].
So I play a D7 right here, 5, 4, 5.
And the cool thing about 5 of a 5 of the 5
is you simply move two fingers.
Can you see that?
I simply shifted from 5, 4, 5 to 3, I'm
sorry, 4, 3, 5, that's a G7.
[MUSIC]
So, D7 to G7.
Your D note stays.
[MUSIC]
Okay?
Now we're gonna do the same thing.
Go to C7, which is 3, 2, 3.
And now we need to go to an F and I just
do two two and three.
[MUSIC]
It has a C plus 7,
C augmented 7th here in the 4th line down,
second bar.
I'm not a huge fan of that,
I've heard most people just stay on F
chord for three bars.
[MUSIC]
And then the last bar of
the fourth line it says, E-minor, A7,
a lot of folks would just play an A7 for
that whole bar okay,
just to be clear I'm speaking about, 4th
line down.
One, two, three four, that F chord, I
would just hold that F chord for
the three bars and then that last bar
instead of E-minor A,
I would play just A, all right.
Here we are back at the top.
Notice I'm only using two fingers.
That's a D7 chord plain as day even with
the open A string it works great.
Go to the G7.
I might even leave the A open cause it's a
G9.
That's part of a, it's part of a G chord.
[MUSIC]
Make a difference.
[MUSIC]
C7 and the C note.
[MUSIC]
And F, for three bars.
And A7, I like this one.
6-5-6-7.
6-5-7 cuz it leads so.
[MUSIC]
Basically you've got this
sort of star shape for an A7, you've got
this kind of D7 shape,
which is, you know, I don't know what you
call that.
We call this a diamond and this a star or
something, I don't know.
But you've got this, these are both
dominant chords and
they're the most practical and the most
used.
In this, in the jazz kinda context like
this.
[MUSIC]
I'll slow it way down hear from a G7.
[MUSIC]
F.
[MUSIC]
Okay, A7, to G7.
[MUSIC]
G7.
[MUSIC]
Now D-minor, we'll do 7-7-8.
[MUSIC]
To A7, which is 6-5-7,
and you go back and forth twice.
[MUSIC]
Then F.
[MUSIC]
I do hit an F7 and
I move all three, I move this whole thing
down, so F7.
[SOUND] Is 8-7-8.
E7 is a half step lower 7, 6, 7.
E-flat 7 is 5, 6-5-6.
And D7 is 5-4-5 so it's chromatically the
same shape,
half step, everything moves from the 7th
fret.
[MUSIC]
6th fret, 4th, G7,
again is that other shape.
[SOUND] C7 is back to this shape.
G7 is, [SOUND] 4-3-5.
C7 is.
[SOUND] 3-2-3.
F.
[SOUND] Now in the first ending it says to
go E7, E-flat.
[MUSIC]
I wouldn't do it.
I would, I would leave, leave off that E7,
E-flat 7 as well.
Let's simplify it.
So chromatically, again, last line of the
tune.
Well, next to the last if you count that
second ending.
Next to last tune is.
[MUSIC]
F.
E.
E flat.
B.
G.
C.
F.
And I start over at D7.
So many ways that we can start to play
these chords too.
One of the things that comes to mind is,
well, you've got this seventh and third.
[SOUND] If you move it up the neck.
[SOUND] To the eleventh and tenth fret.
[SOUND] It's also a,
[MUSIC]
D7 and guess what?
Move it down a half step.
It's a G7, 10 and 9.
Move it down another half step, it's a 9,
8, it's a C7.
[MUSIC]
Then you go to the nearest F which in
this case will be 10 as A7.
[MUSIC]
And then you go to the nearest A7 for
that last line, the 4th line, last bar.
Again, I'm just playing two notes down on
the little strings and
it's providing plenty of stuff, right?
Just funking the time.
Okay but we could approach it as a, let's
throw it on it's head and,
and approach it as a full four note chord.
[MUSIC]
You could do this bar chord
at the seventh fret.
For D7 and I always look for the nearest
one.
Where's the nearest G7?
This one, 7-5-8-7.
Now I go this next C7.
It was a lot like that D7, the bar at the
fifth fret.
And that leaves me to this same kind of F.
[SOUND] I don't play it as an F7 because
its tonic chord.
[MUSIC]
Just play it as a straight F.
A7, the nearest one would be there.
Then I go, since I'm here, I go to a close
by D7 which would be the.
[SOUND] First position D7.
[MUSIC]
Then to a G7, would be this one.
Oh, Oh, two, one.
Move myself around here.
[MUSIC]
Where's the nearest C7?
I'm sorry, we're going to an A7, sorry
we're going to a G.
[MUSIC]
D-minor and
A7, so here's a nice D-minor, first
position, 2-3-5.
[MUSIC]
To that bar A7, right.
Now, if we wanna stay down in first
position, this is going to be tricky cuz
we're trying to move chromatically, and
we're out of space, basically.
[MUSIC]
F, E, E-flat, B, I mean, we're not, but
you have to really think about it.
2-3-3 is an F.
[MUSIC]
Just move that back to 1-2-2,
then move it to o for the E-flat, 0-1-1,
again, we're only playing
the bottom three strings, F, E, E, we're
not playing the seventh now.
[MUSIC]
I would go up for the D7.
[MUSIC]
I would go up cuz you really want
the seven.
On this D7, that would be 5-4-0.
G7 would be 3, I'm sorry, 4-3-0.
G9 is actually and a C7 would be a 3-2-3,
and F would be 2-3-3.
All right,
there's a couple different places on the
neck now to play these chords.
[MUSIC]
Now what do you do?
You know, what else can we do rhythmically
that's a whole sub context, right?
[MUSIC] [MUSIC] [MUSIC] [MUSIC] [MUSIC]
[MUSIC]
[MUSIC] Okay.
So what am I thinking about?
I'm thinking about the top notes of these
chords, more than anything.
Cause again, as I've said in Black
Orpheus, in as some other submissions.
It's really about creating another melody,
and creating another rhythm hit,
creating rhythm hits, which are really
melodies.
[MUSIC]
So,
let's assume we've got people chuck in
regular times.
[SOUND]
I mean, somebody could do that and
you could certainly be the guy,
[MUSIC]
who just keeps it straight.
I mean you kinda need that especially
within a certain genre.
A certain era of swing you'd always have
somebody keeping very square time.
As the music progressed and, and got more
virtuosic.
The music got more syncopated and it
became less necessary for
somebody to ride the regular chuck, chuck,
chuck, chuck, chuck all the time.
But typically, like in Jengo's group,
you'd have three guy,
two guys playing that.
And Jengo was then free to do what he,
what he would be doing which were really
like horn sections hits.
One, two, three, four.
[MUSIC]
What I like to do is set up a little hit.
And then do it, do the same rhythmic hit
over a couple of changes.
So, here I'm playing a D, and I'm just
coming off of that E note,
seventh fret has a little melodic
fragment.
When I go to the G, I keep it as an E.
Then you go to C.
It becomes a D note.
And I would stop.
[MUSIC]
So
now I'm using half step motion just to
create.
[MUSIC]
G7.
[MUSIC]
Same thing.
[MUSIC]
Half step below, C7.
[MUSIC]
So, instead
of just stop.
One, two, three, four, one, two, three,
four, one.
I'm doing a little one, two, three, four,
one, two, three, four, one, two, three,
four, one, two, three, four, one, two,
three, four, one, two, three, four.
Now the A7 gets its own kick.
Right?
So here's a new way to think about D7.
It's really a bar on the top two notes.
Five, four, five, five and then that gives
me the B
if I wanna play off of that which is the
13th of a D7.
[MUSIC]
Then I go to G9, and keep that B note.
Now it's the third.
You 've gotta the top note is the 9 is the
A.
A now or if its 9 of G, 4-3-5-5.
[MUSIC]
Right?
C7, coming off that A note, the 13 or the
6,
[MUSIC]
so now those are little.
Bot, one, two, three, four and one, two,
three, four and one.
I'll do it slow.
One, two, three, four.
And one, two, three, four.
And one, two, three.
Now the A7 right?
[MUSIC]
So, again here comes a melody.
[MUSIC]
[MUSIC]
And that's a D7, D9 actually.
The E notes, the 9 of D.
The G's, 13 now.
4-3-7.
And coming off to the, you now,
from the six to the five, or the 13 they
call it.
[MUSIC]
Okay so, C7, C9 actually, again.
It's the same as the D9, but now it's C9.
Down to a C7.
Three, four, so that's a triplet.
Bah, Da, one, two, three, four, bah, da,
dum.
So it's a triplet, da,
da, da, one, two, three, four,
one, two, three, bah, da, one.
So, I'm coming into the one.
Da, da, one, with an upstroke because I'm
starting the triple it with it down.
Triple it one.
Triple it one.
It's very unusual for me to hit a downbeat
on an upstroke.
This is one of the chance times I would
because one, two, three, four.
[MUSIC]
[MUSIC]
So we got one, two, three, four.
[MUSIC]
[MUSIC]
Okay, so what are these kicks?
One, two, three, four.
One, two, three, four.
One, two, three, four.
And one, two, three, four.
And one, two, three, four.
One, two, three, four.
One, two, three, four.
[MUSIC]
So I'm sliding
into each chord.
Those are just different voicings of an F.
[MUSIC]
So that's this kinda F, two fingers.
Up to the next inversion.
5 and 7.
Up to the next inversion.
10 and 10.
And then an A7, which is 12 and 11.'
Kay.
They were at, let me give you some other
places to do the D minor business.
[MUSIC]
So I'm here in the D Minor
which I'm playing like an F chord, but F
is D Minor, right?
Ten and seven.
[MUSIC]
And this is an A7,
though it looks like an E-minor.
It's nine and five.
The point of those is minor chords, D
minor.
[MUSIC]
A7.
[MUSIC]
D minor.
[MUSIC]
A7.
Now it's an F.
Same two notes, and I play it
chromatically down,
to fill that F, E, E flat, D7,
G7, C7, F, G7 is four and three,
C7 is three and two, and F is, is 2 and 3.
So instead of it just being straight, it's
now.
[MUSIC]
[MUSIC]
All right.
[LAUGH]
So this is just the chords.
We haven't even started on the melody yet.
Another approach.
[MUSIC]
That's, I took that C and decided to let
it sustain.
Cause all the stuff before it was so
choppy and jerky, that it needed to then.
You know, it's like piano players, they'll
go, [SOUND] and then they'll go.
[SOUND]
And that's essentially what I'm copying,
so I'm real jumpy,
[MUSIC]
on the D7,
then on the G.
But on the C, I let it sustain from the
C7, to the C7, to the C7.
[MUSIC]
To this.
So this is three and two.
Nine and five.
Ten and eight, that's a, that's C7.
Then nine and.
Nine and ten is a C down to nine and
eight, C7.
[MUSIC]
F.
Again.
[MUSIC]
D-minor.
[MUSIC]
A7.
[MUSIC]
D-minor, A7.
What's that?
Seven and three with an open A.
Nine and five with an open A.
[MUSIC]
Back to fourth, right?
That's D-minor, A7 [INAUDIBLE].
A7.
Here's F.
This is a different kind of F.
5 and 7 backwards chromatically.
Leads us from F to E to E flat to D.
G7 is 4 and 3.
C7 is three and two, and that's F.
[MUSIC]
So,
this little chromatic bit could be
syncopated.
One, two, three, four.
[MUSIC]
Again.
[MUSIC]
[MUSIC]
[MUSIC]
All right. Rather than dive into all the
melodic possibilities here,
I'm gonna stop it right here, and just and
have be a, our little chord,
Sweet Georgia Brown chord possibilities
lesson and
that's probably a lot to chew on already
for many of you.