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Mandolin Lessons: Somewhere Over the Rainbow

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[MUSIC]
Hello there folks.
And we're gonna look at Somewhere Over the
Rainbow here.
I've decided that this would be a
wonderful vehicle for
playing a tune in a whole bunch of
different styles.
Everything from, we're gonna go from the
very simple
tremolo'd version of the melody in the key
of G.
The original was in the key of A-flat, for
those who are interested.
This is a very high register, obviously
sung by Judy Garland when
she was very young, in The Wizard of Oz,
so it's pitched pretty high.
You guys might have a little difficulty
singing it in this key.
You might want to move it to the key of C,
which would mean everything would come
over to the one set of strings lower.
What I think is cool about this tune is
well, first of all, everyone knows it.
So right off the bat you're at this great
advantage.
And the melody isn't difficult, its all in
first position,
there's not too many like odd notes that,
that need to be dealt with or
slides or weird hammer-ons or anything, at
least not in this simple version, and
it has these nice interval jumps.
It starts with an octave G, to high G.
I'll just play through the melody here,
tremolo style and
you can, explore that for yourselves.
[MUSIC]
And
it starts on that low G again and jumps up
to E.
Then it goes to E and C.
So, those kind
of intervals are really great.
There's an octave at the beginning.
Then this is actually a sixth E.
To G to E, and you can play that E,
[MUSIC]
either fretted, at the 7th fret,
second string or open.
[MUSIC]
Whichever you like,
and the E to C is also a sixth.
[MUSIC]
And
does this nice bounce between just two
notes.
[MUSIC]
B and D.
[MUSIC]
C and D.
[MUSIC]
There's your E note,
E note, E, same thing, B and D, but
this time it's C-sharp and E.
[MUSIC]
F-sharp, A, and E.
Back to the beginning.
For one time, the octave.
[MUSIC]
So notice that I'm tremeloing some notes,
and I'm not tremeloing others.
Right there, the D and E.
[MUSIC]
So the quick notes I tend to not tremolo.
[MUSIC]
But you can really improvise where to
tremolo and where not.
Say that second line down, the, the sixth
bar.
[MUSIC]
That's one way to play it,
another way might be.
[MUSIC]
Right?
[MUSIC]
And this B section.
[MUSIC]
You could tremolo it if you choose.
[MUSIC]
If you really want to build tension.
[MUSIC]
[MUSIC]
Sometimes I'm sliding into notes.
[MUSIC]
And sometimes I'm playing double stops.
At the end there I played, bar 22, and I
got to the C.
I played the low E-flat with it because
it's a C-minor.
When I got to that B I played the open D
because that's part of the B-minor chord.
And when I got to this B note, and
bar 23 the second B note, I played a full
E7 chord.
Oh, I'm sorry, one, oh, two.
[MUSIC]
Then on this a note,
I barred the A and the E.
[MUSIC]
On this D7, I played C,
F-sharp and then the A on top.
[MUSIC]
And on this last G,
I played a little B with it.
Those are simply notes that are in the
chords that are happening at those moments
and they're just voiced below the melody
notes so
that the melody note stands out nice and
bright.
So there you have a straight up tremolo
version.
And what I think I'll do next is, is play
the chords to this, this simple version.
[MUSIC]
[MUSIC]
So
here' s a very straight up simple chord
accompaniment to this.
Taking away some of the original jazzy
voicings that Harold Arland gave us.
This is stripped down to a little more of
a folk song version of it.
[MUSIC]
G, E minor, B minor, C, G.
And I'm simply doing this nice
little picking pattern.
4-3-2-3.
Second line.
Then C minor.
G, E minor,
A minor 7, D7, G.
And all of that repeats.
[MUSIC]
Somewhere,
rainbow C,
C, G.
C, C minor, G.
A minor, D7, G,
now the B section.
Someday I wish the la la la.
A minor, G7,
G, for two bars,
A minor to D7.
And G.
To A7.
A minor to B7.
And then we go back to the beginning.
G, A minor, B minor.
C, C, G.
C, C minor, G.
E minor, A minor,
D7, G.
Okay?
There's your simple chord version.
[MUSIC]
[MUSIC]
All right.
Now for you bluegrass pickers, you guys
with the five string banjo in the band.
We're gonna turn this into a, into a
straight up Scruggs style.
[MUSIC]
Bluegrass tune.
Okay?
[SOUND] It's gonna be.
[SOUND] One.
[SOUND] Two.
[SOUND] One.
[SOUND] Two.
[MUSIC]
Three and.
[MUSIC]
G.
[SOUND] E minor.
[SOUND] D minor.
[MUSIC]
C.
[SOUND] C.
[SOUND] G.
[SOUND] So it's the same chords,
just back.
[MUSIC]
B7, G.
[MUSIC]
D7, G.
[MUSIC]
E minor.
[MUSIC]
G.
[MUSIC]
C.
[MUSIC]
C
minor
[MUSIC]
D.
[MUSIC]
E minor.
[MUSIC]
A.
[MUSIC]
D.
[MUSIC]
G.
[MUSIC]
That was A minor.
[MUSIC]
A minor.
[MUSIC]
B7, G.
[MUSIC]
B minor.
[MUSIC]
A minor.
[MUSIC]
D.
[MUSIC]
G.
[MUSIC]
A7.
[MUSIC]
A minor.
[MUSIC]
D7.
[MUSIC]
G minor.
[MUSIC]
B minor.
[MUSIC]
C, C, G.
[MUSIC]
E7, C, C minor.
[MUSIC]
G, A minor.
[MUSIC]
A minor, D7, G.
[MUSIC]
Okay.
Crazy and wacky as it is.
Works, doesn't it?
So now, if you're gonna play the melody to
that.
Oh, I added a couple of chords here and
there.
I'll put them in parentheses for you.
If you're gonna play the melody to that
tune now.
It's gonna be a little bit more freedom.
And we're gonna add some notes beyond
what's in the original.
[MUSIC]
[MUSIC]
So
here we go with the melody bluegrass
style.
[MUSIC]
Just a couple of little extra th, trills,
frills here and there.
[MUSIC]
Okay.
I'm gonna slow it down even more and
add a couple of other little things.
Two, three.
[MUSIC]
Let's go one step further.
[MUSIC]
This is all the A section, right?
[MUSIC]
B section.
[MUSIC]
Okay, let's go over that B section one
more time.
One, two, three, four.
[MUSIC]
Okay.
See?
So I'm treating these notes like.
I talked about a lot of these target
notes, right.
So you can either displace them.
[MUSIC]
Which means to swing them.
Hit them early.
Hit them late, or you can surround them
with other notes.
[MUSIC]
Right?
[MUSIC]
So
that's a combination of playing, instead
of just the B.
And D I'm introducing the A.
[MUSIC]
I'm even introducing the,
the chromatic notes.
[MUSIC]
Now I play a lick.
[MUSIC]
And I can play any lick I want as long as
I get back to the melody at the
appropriate time.
So over that whole A minor chord.
Really the, the whole bar 12 and 13 could
be improvised.
A lot of freedom available, cuz you're
just holding in the, in E notes for
both of those bars.
So if I go back to here.
[MUSIC]
Right here.
[MUSIC]
Then I'm back in.
That's the area where you can take the
most freedom.
I'll do it one more time.
[MUSIC]
Kind of fun to stop early.
Which will actually create some tension,
before launching back into the,
the next melodic fragment, which is the
same as the first one.
[MUSIC]
So
I take that C sharp and E, and I turn it
into.
Kind of a little chunk of of you know, a
bluegrass banjo roll.
[MUSIC]
See I'm really going for
these target notes.
I went for the F sharp.
Then the A, and the E.
So let's go back to bar, we'll call it bar
14,
is the middle of the B section, before
going to A.
[MUSIC]
So I was able to sneak in a couple of
triplets there.
[MUSIC]
So from bar 22.
[MUSIC]
From E up to C and
down to B grammatically from the D.
[MUSIC]
Up and
up to the A from the F sharp at the
beginning of bar 24.
[MUSIC]
'Kay?
This is all with a.
[MUSIC]
All with that kinda bluegrass groove
behind you.
Okay?
So there's your, there's your bluegrass
version.
And next we're gonna turn to something
South American, of course.
[MUSIC]
[MUSIC]
I
feel like I need a set of hats for this,
right.
[COUGH] So here we are, are in in choro,
in Brazilian choro.
If you were to take this classic Brazilian
rhythm.
[MUSIC]
Let's slow it down.
[MUSIC]
So you've got.
[SOUND]
You've got a shaker going through there.
[SOUND]
You've got a big heavy bass drum on
the second beat.
[SOUND]
[MUSIC]
So you've,
you're gonna start this rhythm figure
after the downbeat.
So you're one, two, a one, two.
A one, two, a one, two.
[MUSIC]
And
you're gonna land on the downbeat of the
second bar, second beat.
[MUSIC]
[SOUND]
[MUSIC]
C.
C-minor.
G to the A7.
A-minor.
[MUSIC]
D7.
[MUSIC]
In general, I like to use chords that
are held without open strings so that I
can get this muted effect.
[MUSIC]
Hope that's slowing it down.
[MUSIC]
Really helps.
Bridge.
[MUSIC]
Sorry about that.
Bridge again from the G-chord.
[MUSIC]
A, E, A-Minor,
and D7.
So I'm displacing them.
I'm syncopating the, the,
the repeated note figure to fit in with
the groove of this Brazilian thing.
Two, one, two.
[MUSIC]
Again, this is an area where you can
improvise part 12 and 13.
Here comes bar 14.
Bar 14 is the repeat.
[MUSIC]
And I'm introducing a couple more chords
here cuz this is the Brazilian.
I just love those, those slightly more
sophisticated chord changes.
So I'm gonna sort of gradually work your
way towards the final
jazz version of this thing.
[MUSIC]
[MUSIC]
So, think about impro, playing a melody
with that Brazilian groove, think about a
couple of things.
[MUSIC]
If there's your beat,
[MUSIC]
we're gonna play off the beat.
[MUSIC]
Ever, just for examples sake every time
a melody note comes, I'm playing it one
16th note before it actually is written.
[SOUND]
So this is your one, two, two.
One and two and E, the last E of those
four.
One.
[MUSIC]
These are down beats.
Two, one, two, three, one and two and
three.
And one.
And two.
And one two, and three.
This is challenging stuff.
And I wouldn't necessarily play the whole
melody with that thing pushed like that,
but that is what, what's going on, if you
wanna break it all the way down and
really think it through.
[MUSIC]
One, two, three, one, two, three, one,
two, three, one, two.
One, two, three, one, two, two, three.
So triples are gonna work beautiful over
this.
[MUSIC]
We're still in two, we haven't changed
anything.
It's just how we're gonna phrase that
melody now.
[MUSIC]
Okay?
Now, when we get to the bridge, there's
lots of opportunity.
[MUSIC]
So, now I'm playing around with,
with not playing, displacing stuff so that
it happens later.
And that's gonna create a kind of tension
of its own.
So if you take a phrase.
[MUSIC]
I mean, you could play that whole thing.
[MUSIC]
Again that's the 16ths.
Everything is up.
After the first downbeat.
[MUSIC]
But
you could also mess around with, playing
things later.
[MUSIC]
Purposely making things happen,
after the listener would.
Think it should come and that's gonna
create tension, right?
[MUSIC]
They're expecting it on the downbeat but
you're giving to them on the up,
that's a great way to just build something
interesting.
Comes the, comes to the mind right away
that this is probably,
[MUSIC]
a possible vehicle for cross picking.
[MUSIC]
Just
because introducing the high-E to that
isn't gonna be the end of the world on
either of those chords.
B and G.
[MUSIC]
If you happen late,
you can add the E note later in the cross
picking.
[MUSIC]
Or
it could be part of it right from the
beginning.
[MUSIC]
Sorry.
[MUSIC]
Sorry.
[MUSIC]
So
that's, that's, that's your Brazilian
groove.
Just like, the main thing is gonna be just
getting that thing locked.
The, into your body, that feeling.
And then the freedom will come by
responding, especially [INAUDIBLE].
I mean you put that,
put that Brazilian rhythm section behind
you [LAUGH] you know.
Dat, dat, da, dat, dat, dat, dat, dat, da,
da, da.
It's actually off the beat.
[MUSIC]
And,
[MUSIC]
and
[MUSIC]
the bass drum.
Then, you'll play to that.
And you'll be trying to fit your.
Rhythmic variation into those, rhythmic
parts that are happening all around you.
You'd have to be a brick not to find them.
They're just, it's like a train, man.
It's a, gr, most cool thing, ever,
to get to, sit in the middle of that
rhythm section.
All right, now we go to swing, folks.
[MUSIC]
[MUSIC]
So
here we are going all the way to what is
probably close to what
Harold Arlen intended harmonically.
We're going to look at these, these full
blown jazz chord changes that are here.
Interestingly enough, even though it's in
the key of G and it starts with a G note.
[SOUND] Octave.
He has a C-sharp minor, seven flat five.
[SOUND] To an F-sharp.
[SOUND] Seven, flat nine.
So [NOISE] those, those notes are the flat
five of the C-sharp minor and
the flat nine of the F-sharp seven.
Which is really hip unbelievably beautiful
thing for him to give us.
I mean, that is just.
[SOUND]
To a C-sharp, minor seven, flat five.
[SOUND]
To a C.
[MUSIC]
And
that's two chords over that one E note.
So from the C chord.
To the C minor.
To the F-sharp.
Seven to the B minor.
[SOUND] E7 to A minor.
[SOUND] C minor.
[SOUND] Now B minor.
[SOUND] E7.
[SOUND] A minor.
[SOUND] E7.
Flat nine.
[SOUND] G.
[MUSIC]
[COUGH] Excuse me.
A minor.
[SOUND] D7.
Flat nine.
Flat nine and resolve it to a natural.
The root.
A flat nine is a raised eight.
Which means that it's one from the tonic.
[SOUND] [COUGH] So in this case, it's the
E flat that resolves over to the D.
Go back to the top.
C-sharp minor seven.
[SOUND] Flat five.
F-sharp seven flat nine.
B minor.
Seven.
[MUSIC]
C-sharp minor seven.
C.
C-sharp minor.
F-sharp seven.
B minor.
[MUSIC]
E7.
[SOUND] A minor.
[SOUND] C minor.
[SOUND] B minor.
[SOUND] E7 flat nine.
[SOUND] I don't play the flat nine there.
[SOUND] But I could right like that.
[SOUND] One, three, two.
[SOUND] A minor.
[MUSIC]
And
there I'm not playing the flat nine
either.
The D7.
[SOUND] I could.
[SOUND] I would voice it like that.
If I was trying to play the melody is
chords.
5-1-0.
That would, that would function as a D7
flat.
[SOUND] It looks like a C minor six.
[MUSIC]
Now we're going to go to the bridge.
[SOUND] A minor.
[SOUND] D7.
[SOUND] G.
[SOUND]
A minor.
[SOUND]
D7.
[SOUND] Flat nine.
B minor seven.
[SOUND] B minor seven.
[SOUND] A minor seven.
[MUSIC]
And G.
[MUSIC]
He calls it an,
a C-sharp minor, seven flat five.
[SOUND] To an F-sharp seven.
[SOUND] Which leads you to the [NOISE] B
minor.
[SOUND] D minor nine.
[SOUND] A minor seven.
[SOUND] D7, D9 really.
[SOUND] Back to your C-sharp [NOISE] minor
seven flat five.
[MUSIC]
B minor.
[MUSIC]
Sorry the,
the C-sharp minor in this bar it's part
two of the song it is also bar 19.
[SOUND] It happens on the last beat.
[SOUND]
Okay.
So don't change that chord to early.
Second bar.
[SOUND] B minor.
[SOUND] Right here.
[SOUND] On the G note.
[SOUND] Here's bar 20.
[SOUND] C-sharp.
F-sharp.
G minor.
E7 flat nine.
[SOUND] A minor.
[SOUND] C minor.
[SOUND] B minor.
[SOUND] E7 flat nine.
[SOUND]
D7 flat nine.
[SOUND] I don't do the flat nine.
[SOUND] I, you know, in a mandolin just
with a melody that low.
I'm not playing that.
And in bar six, I don't always play the
flat nine of the E7.
[MUSIC]
Just, just for a heads up.
[MUSIC]
So now we're into.
[MUSIC]
A walking bass.
Brushes on the, on the side of the snare.
And, and brushes on the snare.
[SOUND]
That kind of feel.
[MUSIC]
Two.
Three.
And.
[MUSIC]
C.
[MUSIC]
All right.
So it's, you know,
it's really all about swing.
It's all about that groove.
That's, that's, that's really where my
focus is on this kind of thing.
I'm really thinking about the rhythm
section is just there, you know?
[MUSIC]
So with that underlying pause.
I've just got all this freedom to place
this stuff kind of anywhere I want.
[MUSIC]
[MUSIC]
Okay.
So to break some of that down.
What in the world was I thinking about?
Number one is time.
Just timing, timing, timing is totally the
game here.
When you're you're talking about swing.
You can pretty much get away with almost
anything if it's got a good feel to it.
You know?
So when you play.
[MUSIC]
You know, it's all basing itself off of
this.
[MUSIC]
And you, you try to imagine what it is,
you know, what it is that great singers do
when they phrase a melody, you know?
They either play before or ahead of the
intended note.
Where you think it's gonna fall.
[MUSIC]
That was ahead.
See.
Right on the beat would be one, two, one,
two, three, four.
But instead we're [SOUND].
[MUSIC]
Very similar
to what we were doing in the Brazilian
version where everything was anticipated.
But now we're gonna, now we're gonna play
around with like.
[MUSIC]
So that's a way to improvise where you're
not actually adding any notes that aren't
written.
But you're repeating them.
[MUSIC]
Triplets, right?
[MUSIC]
The same thing that worked in
the Brazilian thing is gonna work
beautifully here.
Triplets across any fragment.
[MUSIC]
It's gonna fit right in there.
So, so think of, think of ways to
improvise without changing,
without adding pitches, without filling.
And right away it just, it's a whole area.
[MUSIC]
Now I'm just waiting.
Instead of hitting right on that beat,
it's.
[MUSIC]
It's like a polka for a minute.
[MUSIC]
[LAUGH] All right.
Why not?
Have fun with it.
Takes us into the bridge.
[MUSIC]
You know its like a big band swing thing.
[MUSIC]
What would they do those swing guys?
To make those people dance.
Same, same.
[MUSIC]
Modulation.
[MUSIC]
So in the same way that.
[MUSIC]
Those kind of long triplets work.
The doubled up triples work.
[MUSIC]
You just fit in twice as many.
[MUSIC]
Instead of.
[MUSIC]
So don't be afraid to go for it.
[MUSIC]
All right?
Why not play the whole tune that way?
Well, it'll get a little stale after
while.
But what a nice thing to introduce just
occasionally, just to,
just to get people's attention.
[SOUND]
So then,
you know, there's one step further which
is
improvising freely on the changes.
Let's do a little of that.
[MUSIC]
[MUSIC]
You know, I would, I would start this,
this part of the improvisation exercise by
saying first off.
It's just such a great tune that I really
would hate for people to just launch into
their, their licks that they would play
over each one of these sets of chords.
Because it's just it, it would be to
almost destroy a great thing.
That said, I want people to know the
harmony that's happening at every moment,
you know, to know what is a C-sharp minor
seven flat five.
[MUSIC]
What are the notes of that chord.
C.
E.
G.
B flat.
I mean, B natural.
C sharp and E.
[MUSIC]
You know,
it's important to, to have that
information available to you.
But not actually use it in as, in an
academic way.
So this is the, this is going to be the
real challenge.
Once you head down that road of like,
okay.
I'm gonna play over the changes.
You're, you're heading into tenuous
territory because it can just start
to sound like arpeggios, superimposed over
chords.
[MUSIC]
To an F-sharp, seven flat nine.
[MUSIC]
To be a B minor.
[MUSIC]
To a C-sharp minor, seven flat, five to C.
[MUSIC]
C-sharp minor.
F-sharp seven.
E minor.
E7.
A minor.
C minor.
You know, what happened to Somewhere Over
the Rainbow?
Where'd it go?
[LAUGH] It went somewhere over the rainbow
[LAUGH].
Went all the way over.
So start with the melody [NOISE] is always
the best bet.
[MUSIC]
So hopefully you could still hang on to
the tune while I was doing that.
And what, I think what I'm doing is I'm
coming in and out of the melody, you know?
I'm, I'm starting with the melody.
[MUSIC]
Now I'm in a riff.
[MUSIC]
But I'm coming into this note cuz I,
it's time to like bring the listener back.
[MUSIC]
So I'm coming in the certain key notes
that, that tell me, yes, we're still,
we're still in this song.
[MUSIC]
Okay.
And so that way I went pretty far starting
to introduce some chromatic stuff.
That built a heck of a lot of tension, but
you just don't wanna stay there forever
right.
You wanna get them in there and then come
back out of it.
So short of transcribing all of that stuff
that I just played which
of course, I highly recommend.
No.
[LAUGH] I would actually
recommend grabbing little chunks of it
here and there that appeal to you.
And, and think about, mostly think about
what I was doing rhythmically.
And don't worry about the numbers game
quite as much.
You know, as you get more familiar, you'll
say, oh,
there hey look he played the flat nine
right there.
That was so cool how he, how he introduced
that chord tone over that E7.
In that otherwise, melodic phrase that had
its, it had its own trajectory.
And, and the most important thing about
the line at that moment was that,
it was going someplace.
Everybody knew where it was going.
And to fill in the actual harmony of the,
of the chord at that moment is a, is a
nice thing to do.
It's not the end of the world, though.
If you don't land on every single chord
tone exactly where where you intended.
Most important that you got to the,
to place you wanted to get to at the right
beat.
That's really the most important thing.
So let's look at it from a bluegrass
standpoint again.
Let's go all the way back.
[MUSIC]
[MUSIC]
Very close to swing, ain't it?
Bluegrass, of course it is.
What did Benny Martin say?
Bluegrass is on a line between jazz and
bluegrass, and jazz is hard to pick.
Well, okay.
[LAUGH] so again, rhythmic feel, being in
the, the, the,
the real 16th division of the style that
you're playing.
I think is at the heart of everything I'm
talking about here today,
is that to understand the feel of a style.
[SOUND]
Bluegrass.
[SOUND] Brazilian.
[SOUND]
Swing.
[SOUND]
Right?
That's really that's the real meat of the,
of the lesson here.
It's that is that we want to play in the
style, right?
We want to hear the 16th notes on the
banjo as our grid, and
lock all of our 16th notes when we're
improvising in bluegrass to that.
[SOUND]
Right?
[MUSIC]
We're hearing.
[SOUND]
When we are playing the back beats.
That's, that's what you really wanna get,
all right?
So I also checked out a completely left
field thing recently.
And that's this Hawaiian ukulele player,
playing this tune.
[LAUGH] So let's turn left right now.
[MUSIC]
[MUSIC]
So just to turn left here for a minute.
There's this great Hawaiian ukulele player
named Israel.
Israel Kamakawiwo'ole, Kamakawiwo'ole
[INAUDIBLE].
And he did a version of this tune with
super stripped down chords.
I mean C, E minor, F, G7.
[NOISE] A minor there.
That's it.
And had to change the melody occasionally.
But I dug it.
It's a kind of reggae Hawaiian groove.
[NOISE] and it's in the key of C.
[MUSIC]
Had a huge hit with this.
Two million, five hundred and
eight thousand hits on YouTube watching
this thing.
[LAUGH] So the strumming pattern for you
ukulele mandolin players out there.
It's like a.
[MUSIC]
Bass up, down, up, up down.
Up, down, up, down.
Bass up, down, up, down, base up, down,
up, down.
[MUSIC]
Again in my
tradition of always keep the back and
forth going.
[MUSIC]
And
those little other notes are just gonna be
ghost notes.
You're gonna not play anything but just
scrape the string lightly.
[MUSIC]
Down, up, up, up.
No, down, up, up, down, up, down, up, up,
down, bass,
up, down, up, up, down, bass, up, down,
up, up down.
[MUSIC]
E minor.
[MUSIC]
So here's the,
here's how he plays the verse.
[MUSIC]
I'm sorry, I'm backwards.
He play sit with a C.
[MUSIC]
E minor.
[MUSIC]
F.
[MUSIC]
C.
[MUSIC]
F.
[MUSIC]
G7.
[MUSIC]
And A minor.
[MUSIC]
To an F.
[MUSIC]
And that's his chorus.
Very, very different but very sweet.
Very Hawaiian.
The chorus again.
[MUSIC]
F.
[MUSIC]
C.
[MUSIC]
G7.
[MUSIC]
A minor.
[MUSIC]
For two bars.
[MUSIC]
And F for one bar.
[MUSIC]
G.
[MUSIC]
A minor.
[MUSIC]
Into F.
[MUSIC]
Doesn't even go to the D7, F.
[MUSIC]
Back to.
[MUSIC]
This is a better key for
you guys to sing, too.
[MUSIC]
F.
[MUSIC]
C.
[MUSIC]
G.
[MUSIC]
G or G7.
[MUSIC]
And A minor.
[MUSIC]
F.
[MUSIC]
So
your melody [NOISE] is starting on the low
C.
[MUSIC]
And going up to a, [NOISE] a high C.
[MUSIC]
So as I said earlier, to play it in,
you played in G [NOISE] for most of what
I've given you today.
To move it to the key of C, you're simply
gonna move everything over one string and
you're there.
[MUSIC]
So.
[MUSIC]
Right.
But he doesn't, when he gets to the verse.
[MUSIC]
He does that and
then he kinda does it again.
[MUSIC]
He doesn't go to.
[MUSIC]
He doesn't go to that.
[MUSIC]
Cuz he goes to a G chord again.
[MUSIC]
And the A minor.
[MUSIC]
Then the F.
[SOUND] And that's his whole version of
the tune.
So, a sweet little Hawaiian goodbye here.
A little aloha.
As a way of ending this gigantic gymnasi,
gymnastic look at an otherwise very simple
tune.
But hopefully, opening some pathways for
you guys and
doorways into some other ways of thinking
about music, music, music.
Mandolin music.
Thank you all.
A lot of fun with this one.
Hope you had, hope you enjoyed it.
Somewhere Over The Rainbow.
See you soon.
[MUSIC]