This is a public version of the members-only Violin with Nathan Cole, at ArtistWorks. Functionality is limited, but CLICK HERE for full access if you’re ready to take your playing to the next level.

These lessons are available only to members of Violin with Nathan Cole.
Join Now

Beginner Violin
 ≡ 
Intermediate Violin
 ≡ 
Advanced Violin
 ≡ 
Orchestral Excerpts
 ≡ 
Concertmaster Solos
 ≡ 
30 Day Challenge
 ≡ 
+Music
 ≡ 
«Prev of Next»

Violin Lessons: Jingle Bells

Lesson Video Exchanges () submit video Submit a Video Lesson Study Materials () This lesson calls for a video submission
Study Materials
information below
Lesson Specific Downloads
Play Along Tracks
Backing Tracks +
Written Materials +

+Beginner Violin

+Intermediate Violin

+Advanced Violin

+Orchestral Excerpts

+Concertmaster Solos

Additional Materials +
Close
resource information below Close
Collaborations for
resource information below Close
Submit a video for   
Violin

This video lesson is available only to members of
Violin with Nathan Cole.

Join Now

information below Close
Information
 ≡ 
Course Description
 ≡ 

This page contains a transcription of a video lesson from Violin with Nathan Cole. This is only a preview of what you get when you take Violin Lessons at ArtistWorks. The transcription is only one of the valuable tools we provide our online members. Sign up today for unlimited access to all lessons, plus submit videos to your teacher for personal feedback on your playing.

CLICK HERE for full access.
X
X
X
[MUSIC]
Jingle Bells.
If you are a closer to beginning player,
you're here because you're ready to get
used to spiccato and
different kinds of off the string playing,
and if you're a more advanced player,
you may be here because I said you've
forgotten about the different kinds of off
the string playing and you need to play
Jingle Bells to brush up.
Cuz this is a great one to help us
remember
two different kinds of off the string
playing, ones where the,
the kind where you set the bow first,
which is the same as the collé stroke.
And spiccato, where you're not setting the
bow in between the notes,
so, pretty simply, these are the different
kinds.
First, the one where you set the bow
because you have time.
[MUSIC]
And the one where you don't have time.
[MUSIC]
The problem is there are pieces that
are written in a speed and a tempo that's
kinda in between those two and
you may not be sure which one you wanna
use.
So it's important to make a decision and
go with it [LAUGH] because you get into
all kinds of trouble.
When you take the bow off the string and
you don't have a plan for
how you're gonna play once it's off.
So this is a great way you play the slow
version of Jingle Bells,
you play the fast version of Jingle Bells,
and you get to work both kinds and be very
clear how you do them.
So in the slow version of Jingle Bells,
you have time in between the eighth notes
to set up your collé.
[MUSIC]
Now I leave the bow.
[MUSIC]
I leave it again.
[MUSIC]
So at the end of those long notes
there is no need to pick up the bow but
in between the runs of eighth notes,
I have time to set it.
And so that's what I'm doing.
And when we get into the main tune, the
chorus of Jingle Bells.
[MUSIC]
So again,
it's the same thing.
Pretty simple.
After a long note, I don't need to pick
the bow up.
I pick the bow up in-between eighth notes
so that I can get my finger articulation.
Now, in the fast version,
I'm not gonna have time in-between the
eighth notes to set it.
So some people find that actually easier.
I always start from the string with the
you know, the collé type of articulation.
But after that I don't set the bow in
between.
[MUSIC]
So, in all of that I've only had
one true articulation from the string and
that's the very first note.
And that's gonna hold true for quite a
while.
[MUSIC]
So once you kinda get into
that rhythm it's quite easy.
You, you don't have to set the bow so you
don't worry about it.
And again, that's something that more
advanced players often forget.
They're concerned with getting back to the
string,
getting articulation and if you don't have
time, you don't have time.
So you just let the bow have its natural
bounce and that's spiccato.
So I'll be interested to see your
submissions here to see how well you
understand that, and my hope is that
you're going to find the natural bounce,
the natural spiccato of the bow pretty
easy and natural when you're not
trying to pick it up from the string
because the bow wants to bounce.
[SOUND] It just takes some practice to let
it
do it on it's own without getting in the
way.
[MUSIC]