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Electric Bass Lessons: Major and Minor Arpeggios 7ths

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[MUSIC]
Most music can be broken down.
In a series of chords and to the simplest
chords, for
instance a C major, which uses the root,
third and the fifth.
So-
[MUSIC]
And you will hear that in everything.
Every style of music.
And one of the interesting things is when
you add the seventh,
the major seventh for instance, it starts
to hear, you,
you can start to hear a little bit of Jazz
in there, so here's the C major.
[MUSIC]
>> Now
it's starting to sound a little jazzier.
Regular straight.
[MUSIC]
>> Major seventh.
[MUSIC]
>> And already.
[MUSIC]
Just between those two chords, it's just,
you go from a very straight sound to, more
of a jazzy, it's a lovely sound.
And of course, if you, insert the minor
seventh in there.
It, it has it takes the C minor chord
from.
[MUSIC]
To a C minor seven.
[MUSIC]
And again, given more of a jazz feel.
So there's the major seven, and there's
the minor seven,
so with different combinations of these,
we can really get into some nice chord
patterns.
For instance, if we have the regular C
triad.
[MUSIC]
This will be the minor.
[MUSIC]
But it's, with the minor seven.
[MUSIC]
Just has a little-
[MUSIC]
Little jazzier sound.
[MUSIC]
And then we go.
[MUSIC]
That's pretty straight.
[MUSIC]
But here's the minor seven.
[MUSIC]
Now here's a straight major.
[MUSIC]
And here's the major seven.
[MUSIC]
So
you can see just by lowering that seventh
[COUGH].
To make it either a major seventh, or a
minor seventh,
it just changes the complexion of the
chord.
So if we do our little exercise of
arpeggios and use the combination
of major, minor, major seventh, and minor
sevenths, it might sound like this.
[MUSIC]
Now go to the minor seven.
[MUSIC]
Major seventh.
[MUSIC]
That's a minor seven.
There's another minor seven, major seven.
[MUSIC]
Minor C.
Straight minor.
That's just straight.
Here's the minor seven.
Minor seven.
[MUSIC]
Straight minor.
[MUSIC]
There's straight majors.
[MUSIC]
And there's the major seven.
[MUSIC]
[MUSIC]
Now go to the minor seven.
[MUSIC]
Major seven.
[MUSIC]
[MUSIC]
Go to the minor seven.
[MUSIC]
Major seven.
[MUSIC]