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Electric Bass Lessons: Double Stops

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Now the bass isn't normally thought of as
a choral instrument.
But these days lots of players have taken
the bass to new places,
and lots of good places to use chords and
if done tastefully.
As we get into chords, you can easily
understand why
a lot of players are using five and six
string basses.
It increases the range of the instrument.
And it enables you to hit higher notes,
play the bass more like a guitar at times,
which uh,no problem with, especially if
you use it tastefully.
One of the things I like to use is the
major tenth chord.
[MUSIC]
And
there we are with our number system,
again.
So if we start, one, two, three, four,
five, six, seven, eight, nine.
[SOUND] And there is the major tenth.
And then here is the minor tenth.
[SOUND] So just those two chords alone
[SOUND] are pretty powerful on the bass
[SOUND] and.
One of the things I like to do is just to
develop little exercises,
where you use different combinations of
those intervals.
[MUSIC]
So, you know just-
Foolin around with different ideas.
[MUSIC]
So it's fun to get, used to playing chords
on the bass, and practicing different
intervals like the tri-tone, [SOUND] so
what we'd like to do is get in the habit
of experimenting whenever you can.
With using the chords on the bass, again
when we talk about the tenth,
it's actually just a third,
[MUSIC]
but it's an octave higher, so
if we did the low g,
[MUSIC]
and then the b on the g.
String we have our 10.
[MUSIC]
And then we have our minor 10.
[MUSIC]
So it, it's this sound.
[MUSIC]
And with a G an octave lower, it's.
[MUSIC]
So you hear the difference.
[MUSIC]
And
one of the exercises that I like to do is
practice the G scale and
harmonizing the scale using the tenths.
So what we're gonna do is go all the way
up the neck and play the G scale.
[MUSIC]
This time we'll add the harmony to it.
[MUSIC]
So once again, start on the G.
[MUSIC]
And come back down.
[MUSIC]
So what you're doing is you're using
a combination of majors temps, and minor
temps to harmonize the G scale, and
of course, it's great to do it with all
the notes.
[MUSIC]
Very useful.
[MUSIC]
[MUSIC]
[MUSIC]
And come back down.
[MUSIC]
[MUSIC]
[MUSIC]
And come back down
[MUSIC]