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Rock Guitar Lessons: Sus Chords

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[MUSIC]
One, two, three, four.
[MUSIC]
[MUSIC]
All right.
These are some great chords and
I'm using my thumb as the base note.
And why would I do that?
Why would I use my thumb?
Well first of all, let's take a look at
the chord.
It's a major chord in the key of B and we
played one like that before using our bar,
and then putting our E major shape with
the other fingers.
Now the problem is.
The sus note that I want.
And a sus is basically your.
[MUSIC]
That third note.
One, two, three.
[MUSIC]
And.
[MUSIC]
And it's, it's raised up.
It's suspended in the air, by putting it
up one fret.
So, I wanna make that note happen, back
and forth.
[MUSIC]
But
when I have all four fingers on this
chord, there's no finger left, you know,
if I take one off, it changes the flavor
of the chord, so
somehow I need another finger, and that's
why I bring in the thumb, and
that allows my other fingers
[MUSIC]
To make that little melodic move.
[MUSIC]
Now, in this case the A string.
[MUSIC]
Is a string I don't want to hear,
so I'm able to mute that with thumb by
lightly touching it.
And.
[MUSIC]
I'm also using my multipurpose third
finger to play this note and also mute.
[MUSIC]
So
there's no way that A string is gonna ring
out.
[MUSIC]
I can hit it really hard.
[MUSIC]
And let's look at the strumming pattern.
[MUSIC]
[MUSIC]
So let's see, it starts with a down, down.
[MUSIC]
And has those accents.
[INAUDIBLE]
It's actually one the end of two.
One, and two and.
[MUSIC]
One and two and.
[MUSIC]
Now,
one of the greatest things about being a
guitar player is its really easy
because of the nature of the instrument to
transpose chords and
scales of whatever you play into different
keys.
Especially in this case where we have no
open strings.
We can just move our hand to different
places on the neck, and
we get the same chord in a different key.
And that's just what I wanna do here, I
wanna play the same chord this time in A.
[MUSIC]
And
then I can move it down two more frets to
G.
[MUSIC]
And then in F#.
[MUSIC]
All right.
So I've got a lot of different chords and
I didn't have to learn any new shape.
I could just keep that same thing.
So piano players are gonna be jealous of
us there.
Because you know, if they wanna do that,
they got to re-finger everything and learn
a bunch of new shapes.
And for, in guitar, you just move your
hand and the chord is there.
All right.
So real quickly, you know, that, that's
one way to play a sus chord.
[MUSIC]
But
I wanna briefly take you though the cowboy
chords that we already know and
look at how to make suspensions with those
as well.
Because they're worth knowing.
So let's start off with our E.
And in the earlier example we did this,
where we used our pinkie.
In a way.
This is very similar to the ones we did
previously.
[MUSIC]
But because we have the open string as
our, our root bass note we don't have to
use the thumb because it's already there.
[MUSIC]
All right, the next one.
Let's look at the D.
The D chord.
[MUSIC]
That's a nice sounding one,
that's a really popular, you know, there's
so many songs that have that D sus.
It's such a nice sound.
[MUSIC]
[MUSIC]
And you'll hear a lot of that.
Let's look at some of those.
How about the A.
[MUSIC]
That's an A-major chord.
All you have to do.
[MUSIC]
Is put your second finger on there.
[MUSIC]
And any other opens?
We could do the C.
[MUSIC]
With the pinkie.
[MUSIC]
[MUSIC]
And we can even do the G,
down here with the open strings.
[MUSIC]
Let's see how we do that.
[MUSIC]
I think I've covered the main ones.
And just enjoy the sound of the sus.
The third note of the chord, one, two,
three.
[MUSIC]
Suspend up in the air by a fret.
[MUSIC]
Lift it up a little bit.
That's why it's called a sus.
Sus is short.
For suspended.
One, two, three, four.
[MUSIC]
You got it.
[MUSIC]
[MUSIC]
One, two, three, four.
[MUSIC]