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Rock Guitar Lessons: Time to Crank Up

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[MUSIC]
One, two, three, four.
[MUSIC]
All right, it's time to crank up.
I've showed you a lot of muting techniques
with both the left hand and
the right hand.
And this is finally gonna allow us to turn
up the volume on our guitar and
start enjoying some of that big rock,
distorted, fuzzy sound.
I think you're ready for it, so let's take
this riff, this is all power chords,
we got a power chord in C, and we got a
power chord in F, and
a power chord in E flat, and a power chord
in B flat.
They all look the same, they all feel the
same,
just moving that claw around in different
spots on the guitar.
And this one starts on the end of four,
and
it starts with an upstroke, which is
usually the case for syncopations and
the end of four certainly is a
syncopation, it comes between the beats.
So it's like one and, two and, three and,
four and that's your first note,
it's going to be an upstroke.
One and two and three and four.
[SOUND].
Let's practice just that first note.
One and two and three and four.
[SOUND].
Get your foot tapping one and two and
three and
four, all right, now let's try doing the
end of four, and the one,
the down beat just together, so its be one
and two and three and four.
[SOUND].
That's good.
One, and two, and three, and four
[MUSIC]
Now don't worry if this,
this is not simple stuff, starting on
beats that aren't one takes some practice.
Takes some getting used to cause you
really have to have a sense
of where the time is.
You have to have your foot going, cause
otherwise
what ever you start with sounds like a
down beat and it's not in this case,
it's the end of four we're going to make
sure that your listener knows that.
So you gotta one and two and three and
four and you know where one is.
One and two and three and four.
All right, you got it now, so let's
complete the riff.
It'll be one and two and three and four.
All right, it immediately jumps after
those two chords up to the F.
And let's see what stroke that is.
That one actually starts with the up, as
well, this is a pretty syncopated riff.
That's one of the things I like about it.
So let's listen to it once, one, two, and
three and four.
That's an awesome riff and
I love the stop at the end because you
hear the little reverb tail.
And you hear the fact that, you, can
control the strings,
even with a lot of distortion.
One and two and three and four and
[MUSIC].
Now, a little bit of hum cuz I've got tons
of distortion going on, but
the strings aren't going
[MUSIC].
It's not doing this.
One and two and three and four and.
[MUSIC]
You know there's plenty of
potential chaos in an electric guitar and
we're controlling it with our left hand,
this part, muting it, I'm muting it with
this part.
One and two and three and four.
[SOUND] That's nice.
And then we'll do the answer to that.
[SOUND] Also begins on the end of four and
syncopation and the upstroke.
And you already know the chords,
I think we are ready to play it,
one, two, three, four!
Four.
[MUSIC]
One, two, three, four.
[MUSIC]