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Rock Guitar Lessons: Heavy Metal Shuffle

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[MUSIC]
One.
Two.
One, two, three, four.
[MUSIC]
[MUSIC]
All right, it's time for
the heavy metal shuffle and this still is
really at it's core the same kind of
groove as our,
[MUSIC]
below it is that flowing rhythmic grid of
triplets.
One, two, three, one, two, three, one,
two, three, one, two, three.
We've just kind of fast with it.
Duh, duh, duh.
Duh, duh, duh.
Duh, duh, duh.
Duh, duh, duh.
Duh, duh, duh.
[MUSIC]
But beneath all this are those triplets,
so I just want you to be aware of that,
that feel.
All right now lets take a look at this,
we're doing a power chord,
[MUSIC]
but we're separating,
separating it into parts.
We're going.
[MUSIC]
So we're playing the top part as accents.
[MUSIC]
And
then we're doing a triplet on our bottom
bass note there.
So let's put that in time, let's count.
One, two, three, four.
[MUSIC]
Now
this is really gonna be important to mute
on this one and.
[MUSIC]
We're starting to get some pretty fast
picking so let's slow it down a bit and
get used to it first.
Let's see, we'll go.
One, two, three, four.
[MUSIC]
This is such a good lick.
It's just really heavy sounding to go
between the higher sorta, sparkly notes.
And then those mean, low you know, tough,
muted notes.
Three, four.
[MUSIC]
Then
there's some mean sounding notes below,
single notes, A and G sharp.
[MUSIC]
Then we repeat again.
[MUSIC]
Now there's an interesting thing here,
I'm using the open strings, the top two
and you can watch my left hand position.
[MUSIC]
Where I
go between muting those strings, so they
won't make any noise,
and letting off making some room for those
strings to ring.
So watch my left hand as it comes up and
down during that lick to make those notes
come out.
Three, four.
[MUSIC]
[MUSIC]
[MUSIC]
All right now the one thing I would
say about this that I haven't yet.
Is these accents that are up strokes,
those are up, up, up, up.
[MUSIC]
And I found that the first time
I do them often times I'll play them with
a down stroke and
after that first initial downstroke I'll
go back into the pattern of ups and
I think it's because there's nothing when
I begin playing it.
I'm sort of coming from playing nothing.
And so, I don't have to sync it up to
anything.
And but you know, I don't want to give you
a long explanation.
I'm just gonna tell you that it's okay to
start with a couple down strokes.
[MUSIC]
Then after you're into it you need
to do the upstroke.
So if we go down, and then we do that
little triplet.
[MUSIC]
Let's see what picking
strokes the triplet is.
[MUSIC]
Okay, it's down, up, down.
[MUSIC]
Let's practice just that by itself too.
Cause that's, that's kind of a tricky
part.
It's just pretty fast.
So we'll go.
[MUSIC]
Nice and muted.
We'll slow it down a little bit.
One, two, three, four, one.
[MUSIC]
Even slower one, and I'm coming in on the,
on the second beat, on two, so we go like,
one, two, three, four,
one, two, one, two, one, two, one, two,
even slower,
let's, let's have a contest to see how
slow we can go with this.
One, two, three, four, one.
[SOUND]
There,
we can really [SOUND] take a look at the
details now.
[SOUND] With this tempo, let's start
throwing in the chords.
So we'll go one, two, three, four.
[MUSIC]
All right, we're gonna speed it up a
little bit.
One, two, three, four.
[MUSIC]
[MUSIC]
Even at that slow tempo it
sounds pretty cool.
Now let's make it a little faster.
One, two, three, four.
[MUSIC]
[MUSIC]
Now this is so much cooler than,
than just sort of playing the whole chord.
[MUSIC]
You know,
certain places where that could be nice.
[MUSIC]
But
I sort of like that separation of high
notes and low notes.
One, two, three, four.
[MUSIC]
[MUSIC]
And
the same thing there with the open
strings.
[MUSIC]
We could, we could take that and
really put the magnifying glass on it by
putting it slowly.
One, two, three, four.
[MUSIC]
[SOUND] Okay and
those are both upstrokes in the accents
[SOUND] and then down,
up, down [SOUND] on that low note.
All right, let's see how it all sounds
together, we were working with the parts,
I want to hear the whole thing.
It's important to hear it, before we play
it.
One, two, three, four [SOUND].
[MUSIC]
[MUSIC]
[MUSIC]
One, two, one, two, three, four.
[MUSIC]