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Rock Guitar Lessons: Arpeggiating Chords 2

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[MUSIC]
One, two, three, four.
[MUSIC]
All right, we're still arpeggiating our
chords, and I just wanna show you
a really cool guitarish, it's a common
move that happens on guitar a lot.
And it's taking a C chord.
[MUSIC]
Your C cowboy chord.
[MUSIC]
And just playing the bottom three notes.
[MUSIC]
And muting them with some distortion.
[MUSIC]
At least in this example I am.
And then switching that [SOUND] to a
single finger [SOUND] and
a couple of open strings, so this is.
[MUSIC]
Now in the big picture of what these
chords are.
The second chord with a single finger is
actually just a little chunk of a big
huge G-chord.
[MUSIC]
But we're only playing three notes of it.
So when we need this one finger, to get
those three notes.
And I'm going to do the same thing on the
bottom strings.
[MUSIC]
That's a G-chord, and then.
This actually tunes up to be a D.
With the F sharp and the bass.
And here we go.
There is your F sharp.
So this one sounds like.
[MUSIC]
The nicest thing about that
is it is the same fingering as the first
two chords just on a different string.
So we have.
[MUSIC]
And
then my opening chord, I'm going to do an
E minor chord, but with a ninth in it.
Now what is a ninth?
If we go one, two, three, four, five, six,
seven, eight, nine, [SOUND].
In this case it's F sharp and
I'm gonna make it minor by putting in the
minor third [SOUND].
Which is, you know, one, two, three.
So that's a really nice sounding chord.
[MUSIC]
Again,
I just want to quickly review the strokes
are exactly as if I
were going to finger-pick it with my claw
primitive finger-picking technique,
with the base notes or with the thumb, and
all the others are with the first finger.
[MUSIC]
And I just do a picking version of that.
It should be a down stroke on the low
notes and all ups on the others.
So it's down, up, up, up, up, up, down,
up, up, up, up, up.
[MUSIC]
Not
particularly efficient, but it's worked
for me for this long.
So, I have to recommend it because it
works.
[MUSIC]
I'm doing a small little introduction.
[MUSIC]
To get into that first chord, three notes.
[MUSIC]
And I'm doing them all with down strokes,
because that's what I'd do if I was going
to finger pick it.
[MUSIC]
So
I'm just imitating what my thumb would do
with the pick.
[MUSIC]
All right.
Let's try this together really slow.
One, two, three, four.
[MUSIC]
And
let's slow down even more, it's gonna get
heavy when we slow it down.
One, two, three, four.
[SOUND]
Keeping all those notes nice and tight and
accurate by muting on the bridge, making
sure our picking is accurate.
Let's crank up some distortion and really
hear that those, those sound toughen up.
One, two, three, four.
[MUSIC]
All right.
One time time up to speed.
One, two, three, four.
[MUSIC]
[MUSIC]
One, two, three, four.
[MUSIC]