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Rock Guitar Lessons: Pentatonic Solo 8

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[MUSIC]
[MUSIC]
One, two, three, four!
[MUSIC]
[MUSIC]
[MUSIC]
[MUSIC]
[MUSIC]
[MUSIC]
[MUSIC]
All right,
we've added a shuffle to our feel of these
pentatonic licks and
I've added a slightly different pattern
that I wanna show you.
It's based on this.
[MUSIC]
So
we're still beginning with our up stroke.
[SOUND] But this time, instead of going to
the lower string,
we're staying on the same string, and
doing, a hammer on.
[SOUND] And then a pull off.
[SOUND] So we get two notes for free.
Pick one and get two for, two after that,
courtesy of our left hand.
[MUSIC]
[MUSIC]
That's all just one picked note,
with an upstroke, after that I'm gonna do
a downstroke on that next lower string.
This is all generated by our pinky.
So, two picked notes, and this is sort of
a triplet feel,
like [SOUND] triplet one, [SOUND] and
I'll slow it down [SOUND] it's got holes
in time,
[SOUND] you hear the reverb [SOUND] make
sure we're in time [SOUND] upstroke,
and there's a pretty long time between the
upstroke.
[MUSIC]
And the down stroke.
Cause there's two notes in there that we
don't have to pick, and
that's, that's nice.
It gives us a lot of time to get ready for
that down stroke.
So up down three four.
[MUSIC]
All right,
so that's, I know you nailed that.
Now let's get the next one.
[MUSIC]
And it's the same lick.
But we have to slightly change our
fingering to squeeze in to the notes of
the pentatonic scale show it shapes a
little bit different.
Alright there it is, using our pinky and
then going to our
third finger it's a good exercise for both
of these lets put those together.
And then.
[MUSIC]
Let's do it in time.
One, two, three, four.
[MUSIC]
Starting with an up.
[MUSIC]
Up, down.
[MUSIC]
There we go.
[MUSIC]
Sounds good.
[MUSIC]
In time.
[MUSIC]
And I bet you know what to do for
the next one.
[MUSIC]
Inside our familiar pentatonic box shape.
[MUSIC]
Using the third finger.
Same lick, starting with the upstroke.
[MUSIC]
Hammer on pull off.
[MUSIC]
And a down.
[MUSIC]
The last note.
Same lick, we're just doing the same thing
over and over again.
[MUSIC]
Inside the same scale as the next one.
Looks just like the last one.
[MUSIC]
[MUSIC]
And the last one.
[MUSIC]
I'm gonna give you the pinky challenge.
[MUSIC]
See if you can get that one
with your pinky.
So let's look at these altogether.
[MUSIC]
Now
let's see how these fit in the shuffle
field.
I'm going.
[MUSIC]
[MUSIC]
Now this is kind of interesting cuz I'm
feeling the shuffle.
[MUSIC]
But when I do it this slowly.
[MUSIC]
There we go.
After that, I'm answering it with some
chords.
[MUSIC]
They're power chords, C to D.
That's down, up, up.
And then a little pickup note in the open
A.
And C, three, four.
[MUSIC]
All right, that A is an up stroke.
[MUSIC]
Up.
[MUSIC]
To me that, the,
the way I figure those strokes out.
It all is inside that,
that strumming, shuffly pattern.
So this motion is sort of going the whole
time.
[MUSIC]
As long as that's going,
you're gonna get the right strokes.
But I like to break it down sometimes and
figure out what they are.
So I can, I can aim at them.
[MUSIC]
So let's just practice that transition.
[MUSIC]
[NOISE]
[MUSIC]
That's up, down.
[MUSIC]
And this is a great
muting exercise as well because
[MUSIC]
I'm getting that A note by itself.
[MUSIC]
But I'm kinda,
[MUSIC]
getting a little,
[MUSIC]
muted sweep.
[MUSIC]
A little bit and then the C power chord.
[MUSIC]
All right, let's put that in context.
[MUSIC]
And
then we have and ending with the A power
chord [SOUND] as they're both upstrokes.
One, two, three, four.
[SOUND] Yeah.
[SOUND] So now we can loop this whole
thing, we've got a nice solo and
a nice rhythm and they're going to
contrast with each other really nicely.
One, two, three, four.
[MUSIC]
All right, so let's do really slow once,
just to make sure we nailed all the parts.
One, two, three, four.
[MUSIC]
[MUSIC]
Okay, it's, when it slows down like that,
it's hard to keep the shuffle feel.
[MUSIC]
It starts sounding more like straight 16th
notes but as we speed it up, it's easier
to squeeze that into a shuffle feel.
So if you just keep that bouncy
dup-adup-adup-a kind of feel in your head.
[MUSIC]
Yeah, that feels more like a shuffle.
[MUSIC]
All right, fantastic, let's,
let's listen to it fast one more time, get
it in your ears, you got the techniques
for your fingers and all the different
parts, love to hear you play this one.
One, two, three, four.
[MUSIC]
[MUSIC]
[MUSIC]
[MUSIC]
One, two, three, four!
[MUSIC]