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Rock Guitar Lessons: 3 Note Per String Major Scale

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[MUSIC]
All right, a great moment has arrived.
We're gonna talk about major scales.
So far we've talked about pentatonic.
And we've touched a little bit on, on
minor scales and major scales.
I've mentioned things or there.
But here, I really wanna show you some
more details
about how to play major scales.
Now, if you hear the word major.
I don't wanna scare you away because
you think like I am a rock guy I am not
gonna play major.
I wanna play minor.
Well, major and minor in a certain way are
exactly the same thing.
They have the same notes.
It just depends on which note you start
on.
So, let's not even get into that.
Basically, let me just show you these,
they're gonna sound great, and
you can definitely use them for rock.
You can use them for metal, or you can use
them for jazz or
blues, or any style you want.
These are very useful scales, and
I can remember when I learned them I was
very exited.
So I'm exited to show them to you now.
Now, the way I've organized these on the
neck, is very specific.
I've decided to use three note per string.
So on every string there's three notes.
This gives us a lot of range and it tends
to make the, the picking patterns very
consistent and opens up a lot of
possibilities for fast playing.
So one of the challenges is just to
memorize the notes.
So, you know, there's a PDF that you can
download to look at the diagrams.
It takes a certain amount of time just to
memorize those shapes and
the best way to do it, is to play them.
So, let's look at these scales right now.
The first one, I'm gonna start on C
[MUSIC]
,.
and I'm gonna start up high.
You know, many people play major scales by
starting from the bottom note.
[MUSIC]
But, I wanna start with a high note.
You know, I wanna start soloing on top of
the volcano from the first note.
[MUSIC]
So, our scale is,
[MUSIC]
and it ends there.
And I'm gonna put in one extra note,
[MUSIC],
a slide down to the F to give us a lot
of range.
And the other reason is I think it's
really important when practicing scales
to still have some rhythmic, rhythmic
purpose.
You know, it's not just notes.
There has to be some rhythm to it.
And I always get a little scared if it's
just, you know,
only one rhythm over and over.
I want some variation.
So, the rhythm I came up with, I found
something I really liked and
I have to give credit to Neil Peart, the
drummer from Rush.
Because I'm a huge Rush fan.
And I love this, this drum fill he did
where he goes [SOUND] and I was just.
Every time I hear that I think yeah, it's
an awesome drum fill.
And what it is, is a combination of thirty
second note and sixteenth notes.
So if I go [SOUND] the slower of those two
rhythms,
[SOUND] those are the sixteenth notes.
One two three four, one two three four,
one two three four, one two three four.
I'm gonna actually beat on the back of my
guitar.
[MUSIC]
Those are the sixteenths.
But he begins it with thirty seconds.
And those are really fast.
Those are,
[MUSIC]
but he only does a couple of them.
[MUSIC]
And
that's the rhythm I wanna put into the
scale to make it more interesting for
the ear and in a way it makes it easier to
play.
So this is a win win situation, easier to
play and sounds better.
I like this.
So let's hear that scale with a Neil Peart
kind of phrasing rhythmically.
One, two, three, four.
[MUSIC]
You could hear that [SOUND].
[MUSIC]
All right, I like that a lot.
And that, again, is why I put that last
note in,
rhythmically I need that note as an
ending.
So let's speed it up a little bit, I just
wanna get it in your ears,
then we'll go through the details of
playing it.
One, two, three, four.
That's pretty cool.
So, let's look at what we have to play to
make this happen.
I'm gonna start off with a downstroke and
two pulled off notes.
[MUSIC]
So I don't have to pick that.
Its, that's, we've done that a lot
already.
[MUSIC]
From there,
[MUSIC]
I'm picking.
So, I'm doing down,
[MUSIC]
and then I'm gonna do alternate picking
starting with a downstroke.
[MUSIC]
So, that's.
[MUSIC]
[MUSIC]
There we go.
[MUSIC]
All right.
Let's try that one more time with the
beat.
One, two, three, four.
[MUSIC]
There we go.
[MUSIC]
So, on
the top string we're doing the 32nd notes
and on the next string we're doing 16th's.
[MUSIC]
[MUSIC]
All right.
We're gonna continue from there with our
16th notes.
And we're gonna continue alternate
picking.
[MUSIC]
There we go.
[MUSIC]
So, this
is turning into a really good alternate
picking exercise starting with the down.
[MUSIC]
Here, we're going,
[MUSIC]
[SOUND] down, up, down, up, down,
up, down.
Just pay attention to the place where we
have to go to the next string.
[MUSIC]
That's an upstroke.
That's a little tricky.
[MUSIC]
And we also have to change fingers there,
to stay into the shape, of, of the major
scale.
[MUSIC]
So let's practice that by itself.
Let's start from the beginning.
We'll go.
[MUSIC]
And make sure that we.
Just concentrate on that being your pinky
and an upstroke at the end.
That's gonna help.
One, two, three, four.
[MUSIC]
Yeah.
And the more you do it, the more you can
relax,
the more you can breathe, the more you
don't have to think about it.
It just becomes habit.
One, two, three, four.
[MUSIC]
Alright,
now once we've made it to that G string
it's gonna be easier to
continue alternate picking.
So let's go down further.
One, two, three, four.
I'm even gonna slow it down a little more.
One, two, three, four.
[MUSIC]
One, two, three, four.
[MUSIC]
One, two, three, four.
[MUSIC]
All right.
And we got one note coming up,
[MUSIC]
right there on the D string and
that's gonna be a downstroke.
So, we're gonna go, one, two, three, four.
Alright, that's a nice ending spot, you
could really feel how that,
that rhythm, that's a nice spot to end.
But that's where we begin our next 32nd
note run.
Alright, so
we have two identical rhythms [SOUND].
One, two, three, four.
[MUSIC]
Alright, and
they're both gonna be picked the same.
The three note per string, system, has
kept our picking very consistent.
So once you learn it once, it's gonna work
in the second one.
Let's look at it again.
One, two, three, four.
Alright, and we end with that downstroke.
Now what I want to do is put that in every
one of these scales.
Now why is there more than one scale?
There actually, there's not more than one.
All it is is different positions of the
same scale,
the same notes are in each one.
I'm just starting up one step higher
within that scale, [SOUND] and
I'm doing the same notes.
[MUSIC]
And
then starting up the next one step higher
on the same scale.
[MUSIC]
Now each of these, I have to you know,
to make the same notes requires that I
come up with a different fingering and
that's what's written down on the PDF's
and
that's what's really going to help you
visualize.
I, I, definitely when I learned this I
used the neck paper a lot.
I would sit there and look at the shapes,
and the shapes are relatively easy.
A lot of them, they're very symmetrical
looking, they're nice shapes.
You know, if you like geometry, these are
gonna look kind of nice.
So one, two, from the E.
[MUSIC]
You know if you look at that one,
you've got two whole steps, on two strings
so
that's kinda nice because it's the same
shape.
And then we have, here we have a half step
and a whole step shape.
On two strings.
One here we have a whole step and a half
step shape with two strings.
Then slide down, so that's a very.
You, there's only three different shapes
in that one.
It's not like every string has a different
shape.
One, two, three, four.
[MUSIC]
It's also
gonna workout your pull of technique.
[SOUND] You really have to get those notes
to come out clear and even.
One, two, three, four.
[MUSIC]
Alright,
let's keep going up, one, two, from the F.
[MUSIC]
And from the G, one, two, three, four.
Two, three from the A.
[MUSIC]
Two, three, from the B.
[MUSIC]
Alright,
let's try these a little bit quicker.
I just wanna demonstrate them, and then
we'll take one more look at the details.
One, two, three, four.
[MUSIC]
Two, three, four.
[MUSIC]
Two, three, four.
[MUSIC]
Two, three, four.
[MUSIC]
Two, three, four.
[MUSIC]
Two, three, four.
[MUSIC]
Two, three, four.
[MUSIC]
Two, three, four.
[MUSIC]
Alright,
fantastic, so we get that [SOUND] That's
what I'm looking for.
[MUSIC]
[MUSIC]
[MUSIC]
All right so
let's hear these together one more time
with our 32nd note, 16th note combination.
[SOUND]
Two, three, from the C.
[SOUND]
Two, three, four.
[SOUND]
Two, three, four.
[SOUND]
Two, three, four.
[SOUND]
Two, three, four.
[MUSIC]
Two, three, four.
[MUSIC]
A, three, four.
[SOUND]
Two, three and the beat.
[MUSIC]
And
an amplifier on the C,
fantastic.
So, I think that's a great way to memorize
the shapes.
You know, eventually,
you can start to put all those sequences
that we have already learned.
Into these to, make phrases of your own.
But the first step is really starting to
learn how they look on the fret board.
And I think a more interesting way of
doing that,
rather than just playing the scales up and
down, is to put that rhythm inside.
So I'd love to hear you do some bud a lup,
bup, bup, bup, bup, bup, bup, bud a lup,
bup, bup, bup, bup, bup, bup, buh.
That's a nice rhythm.
It's got a beginning and it's got an end.
You can count to four.
A one, two, three, four.
[MUSIC]
And [INAUDIBLE] on a stronger beat and
I think those things are really important
and these are some great new notes.
Now I should mention cuz I promised you I
would, that I would explain why major and
minor are the same thing.
It really depends on what notes you start
on and what notes.
Is being presented in the chord
progression so for
example if you play an a minor chord.
[MUSIC]
When you hear those notes,
the relationship of those notes to the
chord is going to
give you an a natural minor sound.
[MUSIC]
But also, if you play a C major chord.
[MUSIC]
And you begin with C.
[MUSIC]
You get a major sound.
[MUSIC]
So those sounds are very related,
and often the minor part of that is called
the relative minor, so
there's a little bit, small bit of music
theory terminology for you.
That C major, has a relative minor, which
is A minor.
And that's because they're exactly the
same notes just starting on
a different note, and the relative
intervals that you get are,
let's just see how they sound, again C
major.
Very familiar sound.
[MUSIC]
And then A minor.
[MUSIC]
Let's just take that same scale but
start with A.
[MUSIC]
All right,
so, you can hear how those are very
similar, but one is happy.
[SOUND] I'm so happy.
[MUSIC]
And the other is more.
[MUSIC]
I'm worried about something.
[MUSIC]
All right, so in
a way all these scales are both major and
minor, it just depends on really what your
bass player is playing, you know and what
the chord is, what the rhythm guitar is.
So it's more of a relationship to the
chord that makes it major or minor.
Alright, the more that you get in to
learning songs, and
hearing how people use these scales, that
will really teach you that in great depth.
So I recommend learning a lot of tunes.
And, and just listen.
You know, when you hear a song that has a
scale, you know analyze what it is.
Was it a major, was it minor, what kind of
shapes did they use?
That's really what taught me how to use
these scales, was finding them in tunes.
And they're everywhere.
So, pick out your, your favorite music.
And, and search for the scales and, see if
they work with these fingerings.
And, that's it.
So this is a great place to start.
It's sort of a big place to start so,
don't worry.
It's, it's just take one shape at a time.
Maybe just find your favorite shapes, you
might not even need all of them, you know,
I don't, I, I certainly use some of them
more than others, I have my favorites.
My favorite is probably this one, the.
[MUSIC]
I like that one a lot.
It's very major sounding, and
it's easy to play because the shapes are
very symmetrical.
[MUSIC]
Or you know, they repeat the shape,
I get the, have you know, both these
fingers on a half step and a whole step.
[MUSIC]
And
both these fingers on a whole step and a
half step.
[MUSIC]
And then two whole steps.
[MUSIC]
So it's really easy to visualize.
[MUSIC]
That's my favorite.
So if you wanna start there, that's a good
one.
All right.
And just take them a little bit at a time
and these,
these you can do some amazing fast stuff
in here so but start slow, and
make sure your notes sound good and have a
great time with [SOUND] two, three, four.
[MUSIC]
Two, three, four.
[MUSIC]
Two, three, four.
[SOUND]
Two, three, four.
[MUSIC]
[MUSIC]
Two, three, four.
[MUSIC]
Two, three, four.
[MUSIC]
[MUSIC]
Two, three, four.
[MUSIC]
Two, three, four.
[MUSIC]
Two, three, four.
[MUSIC]
Two, three, four.
[MUSIC]
Two, three, four.
[MUSIC]
[MUSIC]
>> One, two, three, four.
[MUSIC]
Two, three, four.
[MUSIC]
Two, three, four.
[MUSIC]
Two, three, four
[MUSIC].
Two, three, four.
[MUSIC].
Two, three, four
[MUSIC].
Two, three, four
[MUSIC]
Two, three, four.
[MUSIC]
Two, three, four.
[MUSIC]
[MUSIC]
Two, three, four.
[MUSIC]
Two, three, four.
[MUSIC]
[MUSIC]
Two, three, four.
[MUSIC]
Two, three, four.
[MUSIC]
Two, three, four.
[MUSIC]
Two, three, four.
[MUSIC]