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Skratch Lessons: Music Theory 1.1

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[MUSIC]
So, what's up, folks.
Welcome to my first tutorial related to
the part music theory.
As the name's indicate, it's about music
theory and
I wanna explain the basic content of the
so-called S notation.
This is a transcription methodology.
Through which you can transcribe or the
drum scratching,
patterns or your pre juggling pattern or
scratching techniques, fading techniques,
basically all the playing strategies you
can use on
this music instrument, this is a turntable
and mixer, you can see this right now.
So, yeah.
Okay I don't wanna spend too much time now
in explaining the advantages of music
theory, so let's say it's simple.
It's a way to get more knowledge about the
thing that we all love
[MUSIC]
And this is making music with turntable
and mixer.
So, for this first lesson, for the second
lesson, I have invited a friend of mine.
His name is Martin baumgardner He is a
studied percussionist.
And he works as a professional music
teacher in Germany, in Berlin.
And he is, originally from Switzerland,
from Lucerne.
And I asked him to show us some helpful
tasks, that will help
you understand the basics of music theory,
such as clapping,
counting, time signature, bars, blah,
blah, blah, and then, after this.
I go in more deep concerning the S
notation,
and I will explain this step by step.
So, I hope you like it.
[MUSIC]
If you hear music like this,
try to hear the difference between a
downbeat and the backbeat.
The back beat is where you here the sharp
sound of the snare drum or a clap.
Listen.
[MUSIC]
You hear that?
On the other hand, we have the down beat,
that's where you hear.
The kick drum or the bass drum that's
gonna be here.
[MUSIC]
If you wanna get safe on this.
[MUSIC]
Always, if you hear music.
If you're listening to music in your car,
or in your earphones.
Try to make sure you hear the backbeat.
Focus on the big backbeat only, like this.
[MUSIC]
[SOUND]
If you wanna take it a step further try to
count one, two, three, four over that
music and
make sure the backbeat is always on the
two and on the four.
one, two, three, four,one, two, three,
four,one, two, three, four, one,
two, three, four.
Sometimes in the beginning of practicing
this kind of stuff,
it might happen that you start counting on
a back beat and
you get twisted up in the music very
easily.
So make sure one, two, three, four, one,
two, three, four.
The backbeat.
It's on two and four, always.
The smallest unit in music,
besides the actual beats themselves, but
the smallest block.
Is a bar.
One bar.
And usually it contains four cravers.
Four quarters.
That's one bar.
But a phrase in music is usually put
together
of a bunch of bars taken together.
Mostly it's four bars.
Sometimes two.
Let's listen to.
[MUSIC].
We count the bar, one, two, three, four,
one, two, three, four,
one, two, three, four, one, two, three,
four, one, two,
three, four, one, two, three, four, one,
two, three, four.
Now try to listen how many bars we hear
until a bigger bunch is gonna be repeated.
We start here, one, two, three, four, one,
two, three, four, one, two, three, four,
one two, three, four and back.
So four bars.
Let's listen to it and count it several
times.
[MUSIC]
[MUSIC]
One, two bar, three bar,
four bar, and back.
One bar.
[MUSIC]
Two bar.
[MUSIC]
three bar.
[MUSIC]
four bar.
[MUSIC]
One.
[MUSIC]
Two.
[MUSIC]
Three.
[MUSIC]
Four.
So the musical phrases in that track.
Except for the bridge which is gonna come
a little later.
It's four bars.
Four bars make one bigger unit.
The smallest formal element is a bar.
A bar is.
The unit in which you count, one,
two, three, four, with two backbeats, two
downbeats.
One.
[SOUND] two, three, four.
One, two, three, four.
[INAUDIBLE] Two bars.
One bar is one.
[SOUND] two, three, four.
A phrase is put together out of a bunch of
bars.
Usually, four.
So that would be one, two, three, four,
one, two, three, four, one, two,
three, four, one, two, three, four, one,
two, three, four, one, two, three break.
Okay, now let's focus back on a four bar
phrase of this song.
And line out the phrase by clapping a
little
variation at the end of every fourth bar.
[MUSIC]
[SOUND] Two,
three, four, one, two,
three, four, one, two,
I'm counting the bars, only the bars.
Three, four.
So I clapped at double speed on the four.
Of the fourth bar.
Second bar.
Third bar.
And again, on the four of the fourth bar,
four, one, two, three, four.
Two, two, three, four.
Three, two, three, four.
Four, two, three, four.
[SOUND] One, two, three, four.
Two, two, three, four.
Three, two, three, four.
Four, two, three, clap, clap.
[SOUND] That's something you might use
often if you do a pick-up
video scratch, or with a percussion thing,
or whatever.
If you do a pick up you usually show the
phrases played,
take care, you're going back to the
beginning.
[MUSIC]
So
now we do a little variation on the
clapping.
[MUSIC]
With it, just before.
Instead of only clapping twice on four of
the fourth bar.
We also clap one time on the three of the
fourth bar.
One, two.
[SOUND] three, four.
Second bar, third bar.
One, two, three, four.
First bar.
Second, two, three, four.
Third, two, three, four.
One, two, three, four.
No clapping.
[MUSIC]
Just listening.
One, two, three, four.
Turn!
Two, three, four.
Take care, one, two, three, four.
Let's see what happens if we clap the
eighth notes through a bar.
I keep on counting the quavers.
But I clap double tempo the eights.
[SOUND] One, two, three, four.
One, two, three, four.
That's not such a big deal, but make sure.
You can clap and count out loud.
That's a tape anyways.
Always keep on counting loud.
It's not the same if you just think it,
try to speak it.
Now, let's go back to this one track we've
been listening a few times.
I still can't think of the of the composer
but, I, I.
Some day I, I remember it.
Let's go back to that and clap eight on
the count of two and four.
Two and four, the back beat.
We listen to the music.
We start counting.
We focus on two and four, and if we're
done with that,
we clap eight while saying two and saying
four.
[MUSIC]
One,
two, three, four, one, two, three, four,
two, two,
three, four, one, two, three, four, two,
two, three,
four, one, two, three, four, one, two,
three, four,
one, two, three, four, one, two, three,
four.
Make sure you understand, one, two, three,
four.
One, two, three, four.
One, two, the back beat is on two and
four.
And these are quarters right now.
And I double speed it, and I gonna have
eight.
[MUSIC]
Try to do that.
[MUSIC]
With your own track.
[MUSIC]