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Skratch Lessons: Music Theory 2.3

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Now, let's fill up one whole bar with only
16.
You see, if you count through it's 16
notes.
They are put together in blocks of four
notes.
And the blocks are tied together with two
lines, two lines.
That indicates 16th.
You'll get used to, to see the difference
between eighths and
16ths in a very short time, trust me.
In the beginning it might be a little
strange, but
you'll get used to that very soon.
Now, I count in and I clap this bar.
One, two, three, four.
One, two, three, four.
One, two, three, four.
In this diagram, you see two different
ways of writing 16ths.
On one, you have four 16 notes tied
together with two stripes.
On two, you have again, four 16 notes tied
together with two stripes.
But then, on three you have four single
notes not tied together but
with two little flags each.
And on four, this is repeated again, four
16 notes had neck and two flags each.
You see, that's the big difference between
eighth and 16ths in the notation realm.
The eighth has one little flag, 16ths do
have two little flags.
Actually in this bar it's just 16, 16th
straight through.
Just two different ways of writing it
down.
Just to make sure, I clap it one time.
One, two, three, four.
One, two, three, four.
You hear?
It's equal 16.
Make sure you understand there is a way of
tying together 16ths in packages.
Then you just make two lines between the
notes.
Or you have to 16ths standing by themself.
Then they have a hat, a neck down, and
two little flags.
That's a whole new combination.
We have three note hats and then we have
three necks.
And now you have to focus on how they are
tied together.
In this example, we have a first note that
is tied over
with a single stripe so you know that's an
eighth.
And then the second two notes they have
actually two lines.
So we have an eighth and two 16ths.
If you count the eighth, you have a note
on one.
And on the second eighth, you have the two
16ths.
That would be a note on the first eighth,
and two notes on the second eighth.
If I count one and, two and, it will be.
[SOUND] One and.
[SOUND] One and, two and,
three and, four and.
One.
[SOUND] And.
[SOUND] Two and.
[SOUND] Three and, four.
[SOUND] And.
I've been repeating this little symbol
four times.
Here we have a four four bar with a
variation.
We two eighths on the beginning, four
16ths, and
then we have the combination I just told
you before, an eight on two 16ths.
I'm gonna count in one bar, and then I'll
clap it, pretty slow.
One, and
two, and three, and four, and.
One, and two, and three, and four and.
One, and two, and three, and four.
And.
[SOUND] I do a little it,
I do it a little faster.
One and two and three and four.
And one and two and three and four.
And one and two and three and four.
And.
And now I do it with only counting one,
two, three, four.
One, two, three, four.
One, two, three, four, one, two, three,
four.
That was pretty fast?
In the last example we mixed various
notes, and
we focused a new way of writing
combinations of eights and 16ths.
Now I show you another variation of
combining eights and sixteenths.
Here you see three notes in the first
little block.
They are tied together in a way that the
beginning,
the first two notes have two stripes.
So, they are 16ths and the lower line just
goes through to the third note,
so that indicates one line for the third
note.
That's an 8th.
So, we have two 16ths and an 8th.
That would be.
[SOUND] Or, with counting, one and
two and three and four and one and.
This is repeated two times.
We have one.
[SOUND], and two.
[SOUND] And.
And then we go to the turned around
version of that, the one we had before.
A eighth note that goes over, and two
16ths.
Three and, [SOUND], and at, on four we
have the same thing, four and [SOUND].
I count in very slowly and then I clap
this bar two times.
One, and two, and three, and four.
And one and two and three and
four and one and two and
three and four and.
Now I count without the and and a little
bit faster.
One, two, three, four.
One, two, three, four.
One, two, three, four.
I clapped without counting.
I'm still gonna count in one bar, but then
I stop counting so
you can focus on just the rhythm.
One.
Two, three, four.
[SOUND]
[MUSIC]