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Banjo Lessons: Up the Neck Part 2: “Skip to My Lou”

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[MUSIC]
Let's
continue right now a do a little bit of
Skip to My Lou.
And Skip to My Lou, we'll just also be
working on the fir, mostly on the first,
second and fifth strings.
And Earl does this a lot because those
strings are under a little more tension.
[MUSIC]
Gives you a sharper, crisper sound.
So, Skip to My Lou.
[MUSIC]
So I'll slow it down and then talk about
what's going on here.
So.
[MUSIC]
Such a standard tune but it's actually
very pretty.
[MUSIC]
So
we're still working off this D position G
chord up here.
I've fretted on the first, index on the
second.
And instead of using forward rolls as I
was with Boil with Boil and
Cabbage Down, I'm using-
[MUSIC]
the Osborne roll throughout.
[MUSIC]
And
then I just slide the ring finger down to
the fifth fret of the first string.
[MUSIC]
And the index slides down too.
But instead of being one fret apart here,
they're two frets apart down here.
And the index goes to the third fret of
the second string.
[MUSIC]
Back to this.
[MUSIC]
And this is your barred G chord.
[MUSIC]
Same as the open position.
But up an octave.
[MUSIC]
Just taking the top two strings and
again, sliding the ring up on the first
string.
It's nice to have a common finger.
Staying on one string if you can makes for
less jumping around.
[MUSIC]
And
then just take that exact position, move
it down.
[MUSIC]
To D chord.
[MUSIC]
And
this is the top part of the regular D
chord.
[MUSIC]
Again, the ring being in common.
Middle on the second string to the index
on the second string.
[MUSIC]
Move it up two
three frets to the tenth fret.
Back to this.
[MUSIC]
Twelfth fret.
[MUSIC]
Now bar the first two strings of
the index.
[MUSIC]
And add the pinky or ring,
whichever's more comfortable for you.
[MUSIC]
On the ninth fret of the first string.
[MUSIC]
And let it go.
[MUSIC]
So,
the only thing that changes when you go
this position with a bar, rather
than having the thumb wrapped around the
neck as you have it for most of it.
[MUSIC]
When I get to that.
[MUSIC]
When you get to that position,
my thumb goes behind the neck.
[MUSIC]
And you can just let go.
[MUSIC]