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Banjo Lessons: Arpeggios in G

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[MUSIC]
As I've mentioned elsewhere,
you're playing Arpeggios whenever you're
playing Scruggs style.
And Arpeggios onto themselves are a really
nice way to improvise.
They give you a lot of information about
playing up the neck.
And just it's a really good thing
technically,
even if you don't use them at all.
But they do make for nice.
Improvisatory tools.
So let's just start with the most basic
one.
We're Arpeggiating a G-Chord.
Third.
[SOUND] Second.
Second.
First.
Fifth.
[SOUND] First.
[SOUND] Second.
[SOUND] Third.
[SOUND]
[MUSIC]
Just the forward, backward roll.
Just the forward, backward roll.
[MUSIC]
And again, I'm using four in a row here.
Thumb.
[SOUND] Index.
[SOUND] Thumb.
[SOUND] Now let's do.
[MUSIC]
A little higher
up where you're doing part of the-
[MUSIC]
Using some of this F position G up here.
[MUSIC]
And
you grab the fifth string at the
seventeenth fret with a ring finger.
[MUSIC]
And it
I just kind of came up with a little tune
that's similar to I Don't Love Nobody.
But different, and it goes like this,
using this Arpeggios.
[MUSIC]
So slowed down, it's-
[MUSIC]
You can even try a little dynamic thing.
[MUSIC]
As you're getting into
the high part of it.
Just kind of start a little softer.
And then build it up a little bit to a
slightly louder level.
[MUSIC]
Okay.
There's that Arpeggio.
[MUSIC]
[MUSIC]
Let's see.
[MUSIC]
Now let's do a little bit of.
[MUSIC]
Well, arpeggiated G sixth chord.
[SOUND] One, two, three, four, five, six.
You have this E note on the second fred of
the first string.
[SOUND]
And you go up to this octave up here.
[MUSIC]
Just part of the first two strings.
Go to the ring at the 14th fret of the
fifth string.
[SOUND] And back down.
[SOUND]
And you can go a little bit lower.
[MUSIC]
Sorry.
[MUSIC]
Sorry.
[MUSIC]
Start off slowly and
build up speed, just it's just a good
technical thing to get
you moving around the finger board if
nothing else.
Okay.
That's the G sixth.
Now let's do it with the G seventh,
flatted seventh.
[SOUND]
And you'll go.
[MUSIC]
That's not covering the,
all the strings, but just for starters.
[SOUND] Sixth fret of the second string
and bar the fifth oh, I'm sorry.
The first two strings at the twelfth fret.
[SOUND] And get to the fifteenth fret of
the fifth string with your pinky.
[MUSIC]
And
to go to the low string to get your flat
at seventh down there, your F note.
You could actually use this
the prior arpeggio [NOISE] for Lone,
Lonesome rail Blues or something like
that,
something where you're going from four
measures of G to a C.
[MUSIC]
Once
again.
[MUSIC]
Just a little flavor, this big,
big explosive thing coming out like that.
So the one that we were just working on.
[MUSIC]
And you have your F position G up here.
[MUSIC]
You're going inside on the third and
second strings.
[MUSIC]
Grab the fifth string with the thumb.
[MUSIC]
Back down.
[MUSIC]
[MUSIC]
Here is the G ninth arpeggiation.
[MUSIC]
And again,
the ninth chord is made when, is created
when you play the flatted seventh.
[MUSIC]
And
also [NOISE] the ninth note of the scale.
[SOUND] One, two, three, four, five, six,
seven, eight, nine.
It's implied that the flatted seventh is
in there.
It's called the G ninth, but it also means
that the ninth is in there.
[SOUND] I mean, that the flatted seventh
is there.
[SOUND] So you have the A note here.
You could also get it down here.
[MUSIC]
It's just a kind of
more colorful G seventh.
[MUSIC]
If you wanna use this in a practical way.
[MUSIC]
It's a nice way to get into a G,
into a C chord from G seventh.
[MUSIC]
But let's just do this much of it.
[MUSIC]
So you could do something like.
[MUSIC]
So Lonesome Road Blues, you could do that.
To the C.
[MUSIC]
That's just
a scale pattern,
a descending scale
pattern of a G ninth.
Then you can do a major seventh.
[MUSIC]
So
we're going in progression, the basic
triad.
We had the sixth, the flat as seventh, the
major seventh.
You have to kind of elude a little bit
just to get this
[NOISE] forward roll seventh fret of the
second string.
[SOUND] Bar on the first two strings.
[SOUND] Go to the sixteen fret of the
fifth string.
[MUSIC]
And if you wanna do the full thing.
[MUSIC]
Sorry.
So you're, some of that sounds slightly
impressionistic as if you're playing
Debussy or
something of that nature.
[MUSIC]