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Renowned Violinist: Richard Amoroso

This week, we had the opportunity to chat with acclaimed violinist, Richard Amoroso, on his career, passions, and insight into the violin.

Interested in joining Richard's school on ArtistWorks, opening February of 2018? Click here to join the pre-sale. 

You had a lot of success from a young age, how did you achieve that?

I trained vigorously as a child. I studied at Settlement Music School in Pennsylvania under tremendous instructors, I could list them for you now (I still know them by name). They were great teachers. I also had a musical family, my father is a professional Cellist, so a certain amount of learning happened at home. 

It can be challenging for young children to stay motivated, how did you find the self-control to practice?

I definitely practiced in spurts. Around middle school, 6th & 7th grade, I started taking my playing very seriously. It was always part of my routine, like homework or brushing my teeth, I just knew I would be practicing an hour a day. Around middle school, I picked up my pace and worked even harder. I lived a well-rounded life with sports and other activities, but when it came to violin, I worked my tail off. 

Do you think that your talent is just natural to you, and practicing comes easy?

Absolutely not. Sure, there is an aptitude for the instrument, but when I returned to violin in my 20's, I would practice 6-8 hours a day. I was spending my own money on private lessons, I had a passion for violin, and I was taking it seriously. It was hours and hours of hard work, but I loved seeing the progress in my playing. 

You talked about returning to violin in your 20's, what's the story there?

I had amazing success with violin at a young age, playing the Philadelphia Orchestra at 14. As I got older though, I didn't train for violin in college as many of my colleagues at the Orchestra did. I stepped away from the instrument. It wasn't until I was 23 that I thought about playing again. 

What made you consider returning to violin in your 20's?

I think it was a case of not knowing how much I loved it until I lost it. When I stepped away from violin, I realized I was passionate about it and that I needed it in my life. I felt a calling. So I asked my dad, since he was a professional musician, if I was too old to return to the instrument. He said "Of course you aren't too old, you have plenty of time!". I still thank him for that encouragement today. In the end, I couldn't walk away from something I loved.

You've gone on to become a resident of the Philadelphia Orchestra and an instructor, what's been most rewarding about that?

I love performing with the Orchestra. Sometimes I'm embarressed to not have the same diplomas as my colleagues, but working for it on my own in my 20's was such a transformative experience. I really invested in myself and worked hard because of it. I used my resourcefulness and to this day- I'm never too shy to ask questions or learn something new. In terms of teaching, I especially love instructing adult students. 

Why is that?

Adult students are self-motivated! They have a desire within themselves to learn. There isnt a parent pushing them to go, they're following their passions and that is something I can connect to. (They're also prepared!). 

I'm sure you'll find a lot of amazing students like that at ArtistWorks!

I hope so! I can't wait. 

Sign up in advance for Richard Amoroso's school, opening in February of 2018. 

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