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Guitar Basics
Introductory Guitar Concepts for All Players
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Tricks & Techniques
An Assortment of Techniques for Specific Playing Situations
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Introductory Jazz Guitar Concepts
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Advanced Jazz Guitar Concepts
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Concepts and Techniques for Playing the Gypsy Style
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Detailed Analysis of Specific Licks and Melodic Ideas
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Jazz & More Guitar Lessons: The Major Scale

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Guitar Basics, The Major Scale Part 1.
It's time for
me to show you what I have already
spoken a little bit about the major scale.
The major scale consists of seven notes,
but eight notes if you count,
[MUSIC]
The octave too.
So, one, G.
[MUSIC]
If we are in the key of G.
G, A.
[SOUND] B, [SOUND] C.
D.
E.
[SOUND] F-sharp.
[SOUND] And G.
And there are many ways to finger and
position such a scale.
Some people think in boxes, you know,
they play like three notes per string,
like this.
[MUSIC]
Next position they do the same,
it starts on the third, like this.
[MUSIC]
And, so on, the next position, same thing.
This is not the way I think.
I prefer to look at the fret
board as one whole unit,
and maybe this is a bit
more difficult at first,
but it will be definitely worth,
checking out for you and
to work on 'cause later on, you will,
will see the benefits of this.
You will be able,
when improvising, to play a frets.
[MUSIC]
it starts up here and
it ends all the way down here, opposite.
If I play the scale like.
[MUSIC]
So that's the range of several octaves,
like, four octaves, or
something like that.
So, instead of using these positions.
[MUSIC]
So
I would recommend you to just
start as a good exercise.
Practice this major scale
just on one string,
with one,
even if you wanna use one finger,
if you wanna use different fingers,
but like, one G,
A, B, C, D, E, F sharp,
and G and then back.
You can use any finger here you like.
[SOUND] And the important thing
is to hear the intervals.
You have a whole step,
this is a whole step.
There's a whole step.
Half step.
[MUSIC]
Whole step.
Whole step.
Whole step.
And half step.
[MUSIC]
And after a while you can start
[MUSIC]
Just using this,
jump around on the guitar neck using these
notes when you, once you hear the in,
intervals and you feel comfortable.
Then you move on to the next string.
[MUSIC].
And once you have these two strings down,
you might start to combine them.
[MUSIC]
Go back and
forth just on these two strings.
Then move on to the next string,
the fourth string.
Start fifth position, D.
[MUSIC]
Same scale, same notes.
G, A, B.
[MUSIC]
C, D, E,
F sharp, G.
And then I start to combine
all of these three things.
[MUSIC]
[MUSIC]
Like that.
Then it's time for the third string.
[MUSIC]
Start combining to the others,
[MUSIC]
like this.
[MUSIC]
Slide a little bit if you like to,
like this.
Make it a little bit fun.
Start on G up here on the
[MUSIC]
Second string.
[MUSIC]
Same notes.
G, A, B, C, D.
[MUSIC]
E, F-sharp, and G.
And on the first string.
[MUSIC]
So,
by teaching you, teaching it this way,
you will understand that.
The guitar isn't just moving.
[MUSIC]
You aren't just moving in this direction.
You can also move like this.
And you can look at
the guitar as one big unit.
And then you can start.
[MUSIC]
Play a scale up here.
[MUSIC]
And then end up.
[MUSIC]
Far down here if you like to.
[MUSIC]
So, larger intervals.
[MUSIC]
Here's trying a little bit.
This one is nice.
[MUSIC]
Here a lift
using 3rds.
So instead of going G,
A, I go G, B, A, C,
B, D, C, E, D, F sharp.
E, G, F sharp, A, and G.
[MUSIC]
B.
And the opposite way.
And you can start using even
larger intervals, like 4th notes.
[MUSIC]
G, C.
A, D, B, E, C,
F sharp, D, G, E,
A, F sharp, B,
and back to G and C.
And it's good to note that this note,
the fourth.
[MUSIC]
If you have it.
[MUSIC]
This is, like,
the note we use when
we'll suspend the chords.
It feels like this note
is going somewhere.
Either, like, or up there.
So it's not a good note to end a phase on,
if you have a melody.
[MUSIC]
[MUSIC]
You feel like it's going in that
direction.
[MUSIC]
Or.
[MUSIC]
So, be aware,
be a little bit careful with that note.
[MUSIC]
Use it, it's more important to use it as
a part of a musical concept or
a musical sentence.
[MUSIC]
Guitar Basics, The Major Scale Part 2.
The reason why I want you to do like this,
like I told you before, to try to play
the scale on one string is to be able to
work on the whole guitar neck, all over
the place, instead of just getting
locked into these certain positions.
[MUSIC]
Like this.
[MUSIC]
So you'll be completely free.
The problem with if you learn a position,
a set fingering, like this or.
[MUSIC]
The problem
might be that you get stuck with
the same fingerings, you know.
Your fingers start moving instead of,
should be the opposite.
You hear something in your head,
a musical idea and
you transfer it through your
fingers out to the guitar.
Instead, the opposite way, just moving
your fingers in a way that you're used
to 'cause human beings have
a good mechanical memory.
When you're used to doing
something like this.
[MUSIC]
It's there, you know.
It might be difficult at first to
not have any positioning at all.
So I will just give you a good
exercise to at least find a couple of.
[MUSIC]
So if you do like that.
Fingering is once again optional, and
some of you may have really large hands,
some of you have smaller hands.
Me, personally,
I like to use all fingers except for
when I play gypsy jazz, I'm more I,
I work mostly with these three.
For the arpeggios I like.
[MUSIC]
I have pretty large hands.
[MUSIC]
And I only add my fourth finger,
when I need to, for
the really big stretches.
You can learn more about that
in the Gypsy Jazz chapter.
But for instance,
if we have the scale here.
[MUSIC]
G, A, B.
[MUSIC]
C, D, E, F sharp, G.
[MUSIC].
Then you can move on up one octave.
You can do it here
[MUSIC]
And up here.
[MUSIC]
And
then you might try to link these together.
[MUSIC]
And go another way back.
[MUSIC]
This way you cover
the whole guitar neck.
[SOUND] Or.
[SOUND] But if you wanna shake out
some shapes of your own,
there are two ways of doing it.
Either you will constantly use three
notes per string like this and
be in the same position.
[MUSIC]
G, A.
B.
C.
D.
E.
F sharp.
G.
A.
B.
C. D. E.
F sharp.
G.
A.
B and C.
And here you can, if you like such
a position you can do all these kinds of
exercises, technical exercises.
If you want to get your pick going.
[MUSIC]
Stuff like that three notes.
[MUSIC]
One, two, three.
One, two, three.
And then
[MUSIC]
Down, up, down.
Down, up, down, up, down, up, down, up,
down, up, down, up, down,
up, down, up, down, up,
down, up, down, up, down,
up, down, up, down.
Up, down, up, down, up, down, up, down.
[MUSIC]
If you want to go up there, for instance,
you can also mute it, like that.
And you can go can do the same,
the same little thing.
[MUSIC]
On the way back.
C, B, A.
[MUSIC]
G, F sharp, E.
B, E, D, C, B,
A, G, F sharp, E,
D, C, and B, A.
[MUSIC]
Or muted.
[MUSIC]
Like this.
[MUSIC]
Something like that.
You can also,
instead of using three notes per string,
you can find it a position
like this if you like to.
[MUSIC]
Using this kind of shape.
G, A, B, C, D,
E, F sharp, G.
[MUSIC]
And
then the next position
would be to start up here.
[MUSIC]
G,.
G, A, B,
C, D, E,
F sharp, G.
If you wanna continue further up.
[MUSIC]
The next one would be.
Or if you wanna do it three notes per
string, you will have to do it like this.
[MUSIC]
Here,
we'll have a larger stretch with that
compared if you're doing like this.
[MUSIC]
You have the three notes per three here,
[MUSIC]
Three, three, three.
All these big steps,
next position would be G, A, B.
C, D, E, F sharp G, A,
B, C, D E, F sharp, G.
[MUSIC]
Or if you want to do it like this.
Instead of [INAUDIBLE] fifth string.
And you have two notes, three notes,
three notes, three notes.
[MUSIC]
And two notes down here.
[MUSIC]
If you want to turn around there or
if you want to turn around up here,
you have three,
[MUSIC]
Or two.
[MUSIC]
You can do these exercises again.
I'm not that much.
If we're doing technical exercises,
like this.
[MUSIC]
Like I explained to you,
but I like more to improvise,
to try to find the melody.
[MUSIC]
Instead using a constant pattern or
a scale pattern.
Then we have one more position up here.
Then we have G here so.
[MUSIC]
G, A, B.
C, D, E, F sharp, G, A,
B, E, D, E, F sharp, G.
[SOUND] If you wanna do three notes
per string [SOUND] it will be like this.
G, A.
[MUSIC]
B, C, D,
F sharp.
[MUSIC].
One more note on that string to
have three notes per string.
E F sharp, G, A, B, C, D, E, F sharp.
G, A.
[MUSIC]
If you want to do like that.
But I will recommend you to as soon as you
feel comfortable start hearing the scale.
Try to find it all over the place.
Use larger intervals.
Thirds fourth note intervals.
You can even do fifth intervals.
You continue up, like this.
[MUSIC]
All the way.
And in even larger intervals, sixths.
[MUSIC]
Like that.
Or seventh intervals.
[MUSIC]
I
will speak more about these
intervals at my jazz basics block.
I will go through all
these intervals there
while I continue to work
on the major scale.
But, I would strongly recommend you to be,
have your ears open,
and try to play the scale
all over the neck like this.
[MUSIC]
Not using any set fingering.
Now, I'm also adding some chromatic notes,
and
I will speak more about that
in the jazz chapter so,
check back there and
we will continue with the next lesson.
[MUSIC]