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Dobro Lessons: How To Hold The Dobro

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[MUSIC].
So now,
I'm gonna discuss just a little bit about
how to hold the dobro on your lap.
It's pretty self-explanatory.
You want the neck to be resting on your
left knee and the body of the instrument
to be resting on your right knee, just in
a comfortable position.
I happen to wear the strap when I play
seated.
It just helps keep it stable.
For me, the dobro can kinda slide around a
little bit if I'm not careful, so
I happen to wear my strap.
You certainly don't have to, but it just,
it just sorta helps me.
But yeah, the main thing is you wanna be
comfortable.
You want your hands and your elbows to be
just sort of at a 90-degree angle,
just comfortable and relaxed.
It's really important to, to have not a
lot of tension in your body.
One thing I've noticed about the dobro is
when you, you play it,
it's easy to sort of hunch over
[MUSIC]
hunch over the instrument.
It's, kind of, everything is, is sort of
this direction,
so what you wanna do is try and maintain
some sort of posture.
You know, it's not exactly my forte, but
it's good to do to keep your back in order
and so just be relaxed.
Rest your hands on the instrument like
this and and
just like I say, keep yourself in a good
posture.
Generally, when you're playing, you're
gonna be looking down at the instrument.
One thing I've noticed is that
the dobro tends to be a really visual
instrument for me.
And usually, I'm looking at my left hand.
Because that is where you're gonna get
your intonation from.
And you want it, the bar, to be in the
correct spot.
So generally you're gonna be looking down
and as I said you just
want it to be relaxed, sitting comfortably
on your lap as such.
[MUSIC]