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Dobro Lessons: "Arkansas Traveler"

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[MUSIC]
Okay, here we're gonna
talk about the song Arkansas Traveler.
Now this is a song that's gonna use, the
melodic style of Dobro playing,
which is where you're playing melodies up
higher on the neck.
[MUSIC]
So, you're gonna wanna have a little bit
of an understanding of that when we get
into this song.
The A part is pretty simple.
The A part is not the melodic style
playing it's just a basic melody,
and you probably recognize it it's
actually,
I think it's maybe been used as a nursery
rhyme.
But the tune itself is a, is a really cool
fiddle tune and
sounds a little bit like this.
[MUSIC]
So the A part's
pretty straightforward,
it uses that cool fiddle ending for
the end of the A part.
[MUSIC]
It can be a little bit of a a tongue
twister, finger twister.
But the main part of it is just.
[MUSIC]
So that's
the A part.
The B part is where it starts to get
tricky.
[MUSIC]
So that whole series
of notes is all in the melodic
style up on the fifth and
seventh fret.
Now, actually the tough part is not the
left hand, but the right hand rolling,
so I've got it written out so you can go
through it really slow and
practice it, but that's the main crux of
this song is that B part.
[MUSIC]
And it uses the same
type of fiddle ending,
which is pretty cool.
So a lot of times, this song is done in
the key of D,
but we do it here in the key of G, and I
got this version from a really
fantastic Dobro player, a friend of mine
by the name of Roger Williams.
So, if you ever get a chance, definitely
check this guy out,
he's such a fantastic player, and little
known,
he's from the New England area and he's
got some great records.
I highly recommend checking out Roger
Williams, he's a big influence of mine and
he sorta showed me this cool way to play
it, so.
The way he would do it in his band is, the
band
would be playing the song in the key of D
which is traditionally what key it's in,
and then when it came time for the Dobro,
they would modulate to the key of G, which
is kind of a cool way to do it.
So I'll go ahead and play it at moderate
tempo, with a backing track, so
you can hear how it sounds in context.
[MUSIC]