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ArtistWorks Vocal School Lessons: Using Your Time at the Audition

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[MUSIC]
When you actually go the audition,
sometimes you have to wait.
And depending on what kind of audition
you've gone to,
there may a number of other people who are
ahead of you.
In going for the big what were called
Cattle-Call type of auditions
which some musical theater auditions are,
where there's tons of people who turn out
for the audition.
Or American Idol, The Voice, et cetera,
there's thousands of people there and
you get a number and you have to wait your
turn.
A lot of people, in their excitement of
being at the audition and
their nervousness about it and such, don't
use their wait time appropriately.
They talk and laugh and, and do things and
drink coffee and you know, do stuff that's
going to reduce their vocal ability be,
right before they're about to audition.
Now, I'm not saying don't be sociable.
But, pay attention.
Your voice needs to stay warmed up.
So it doesn't matter.
You could be sitting in the midst of
hundreds of people, do your lip trills.
Do some exercises.
I've worked with plenty of singers who
just go, okay, everybody's a singer,
they should know.
And if they don't know these exercises,
maybe I'll be educating them to some cool
ones.
And so they're doing their lip trills and
doing their tongue stretches and
massaging their neck and whatnot.
And the other thing is if you can hear
what's going on prior to you, you know,
with other people who are auditioning, you
might be able to learn something.
Additionally, on rare occasion, you can go
to an audition
and the song that you've prepared, the
person right before you is also doing.
[LAUGH]
back in the day,
I remember when Annie was, as a musical
was really big and I, I was
working with a number of different people
who were getting ready for the audition.
And everybody was practicing, the sun will
come out tomorrow, and you know, and
the poor judges had to sit and listen to
hundreds of people singing the same song.
Have mercy on your judges.
If you could have a fourth song, depending
on how many songs you are supposed to have
for auditioning, let's say you're, you're
gonna audition with two.
Always have one to two more, really, under
your thumb and
in your pocket ready to pull out.
If the person before you, if you hear can
them, is doing any of the same ones.
That way you can mix it up.
And and also sometimes you audition and
the judge says, okay thanks, do you have
anything else?
And you don't.
Ooh, that something
else might have been the pivotal point
that got you to the next round.
So that's another aspect of being
prepared.
As you're waiting in the area where
you're, you know, about,
you're, you're getting ready to audition,
mentally map out your performance.
Imagine yourself singing that song to
whomever is going to be judging you.
You might not know so you have to kinda
pretend, but
just imagine yourself singing the song so
it keeps, it keeps your focus.
I wanna talk about how to treat your
judges, and how to interact with them.
They can carry too much serious importance
to you.
In other words, oh my gosh, these are the
people who are going to make or
break my life.
They're not and they are people.
And they're hoping that somebody that they
auditioned will be warm,
genuine, respectful
give them a good time sing something that
they'll enjoy.
It's a lot of hours of listening and
listening and having to keep notes.
Recognize that, have compassion for them.
You don't have to get drippy about it but
don't, hear the don'ts,
don't come in and brag.
I've seen this and I've heard about this
too many times.
In any kind of audition, I'm a greatest
singer, I can do this,
I can do that, and then the person opens
their mouth and they can't.
Horrible.
It would be better just to be a nice
person.
And not say anything about how good you
are or
whatever and then sing the song and nail
it.
Or, not sing the, I mean sing the song and
not nail it but
at least you didn't say how great you were
and then you weren't.
That's the worst.
So don't brag.
[LAUGH]
The other thing is don't argue with them.
If for example, one of the judges says
you, you know,
you're not good, or you can't sing.
Don't stand there and say, but I've been
told so many times that I can.
Just let it roll off your back like a duck
lets water roll right off the back.
Sometimes, you know, like I said, judges
are people and
sometimes they're not that personable
themselves.
So just have pity on them.
If they say something that's abrasive, all
right, they're having a bad day.
[LAUGH] But you can help make sure that
that doesn't occur by being nice to them.
Because it's not that often that a judge
will be
not nice to somebody who's been nice to
them.
Keep your manners good.
Be appreciative.
Say hello.
How are you?
Had a long day?
[LAUGH] I can, you know, I can't believe
you're doing this.
I appreciate it.
Just be nice.
It raises the quality of life wherever you
go.
But for auditions, it really is helpful.
[MUSIC]