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Jazz Guitar Lessons: Constructing Scales: Natural Minor

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Construction Scales:
Natural Minor- Analysis.
Hey, okay, welcome back.
We're gonna, we're gonna go on
to the next minor scale now.
This is a very pure kind of scale, and
it's called, it's got a great name.
It's called Natural Minor.
It's, it's kind of like, the scale you
have to go to a health food store to buy.
All natural ingredients.
So, what that really means is,
this is, this scale is, gonna, as,
in a, in a melodic minor, of course,
all minor scales we'll lower the third.
So, we're gonna start with, and
we're gonna do in the key of A.
Here's A major again,
just back to referencing.
[MUSIC]
Okay, that's A major in the 1st position.
I wanna point out again, that the,
my 6th positions are based on,
on the first finger,
second finger, and pinky,
on the sixth string, and the same
three fingers on the, fifth string.
I just wanna point out the reason
that there's no scale starting,
there's eight positions.
One starting with this is, 'cause very
practical [SOUND] to start a major scale
between your, ring finger,
and, and your pinky.
[MUSIC]
It just.
[MUSIC]
I mean, you might wanna do it,
to torture yourself, but
there's no real good reason to do it.
[MUSIC]
So, you know, that, that's, that,
that's, why we,
we have those six positions.
But getting back to this,
to the, Natural Minor Scale.
So, the major position here.
[MUSIC]
That's the Major Scale in that position.
Of course, we're lowering the 3rd.
[MUSIC]
To make it a Minor Scale.
[MUSIC]
And then,
this one we're gonna
lower two other notes.
In the Dorian,
we lowered the 3rd and the 7th.
This one we're gonna lower, the 3rd,
the 7th, and the sixth degree.
So, here we go.
[MUSIC]
That's the sixth degree.
Now, just to illustrate.
[SOUND] That's the Major, in the Major
Scale it was there, and the Dorian, and
the Melonic was there.
[MUSIC]
We're lowering it, a half step, so,
it's a minor 6th.
[MUSIC]
And the 7th like the Dorian is lowered,
as well.
[MUSIC]
So, if we look at it in reverse.
[MUSIC]
Major.
The only notes that stay the same
to the Major scale in this one.
[MUSIC]
Are the second, and the fourth.
And of course,
[SOUND] the root is always the same.
So, let's go through it real slowly, and
I'll say, the notes that I'm altering,
as I pass them.
This is Position 1,
in sixth string at first finger.
[MUSIC]
Minor 3rd.
[MUSIC]
Minor 6th.
[MUSIC]
Minor 7th.
[MUSIC]
Minor 3rd.
[MUSIC]
Minor 6th.
[MUSIC]
Minor 7th.
[MUSIC]
1.
And then, we'll descend with that.
[MUSIC]
Minor 7th.
[MUSIC]
Minor 6th.
[MUSIC]
Minor 3rd.
[MUSIC]
Minor 7th.
[MUSIC]
Minor 6th.
[MUSIC]
Minor 3rd.
[MUSIC]
And 1.
And, I'll do it without talking,
this time.
[MUSIC]
That's
Position
1.
Position 2,
I'm gonna play the Major Scale, so,
you can have the reference of that, and
then, I'll show you the altered notes.
[MUSIC]
This is the position that never
goes out of no stretch up, or down.
[MUSIC]
Okay, now,
in the Natural Minor Scale
[MUSIC]
Flat third.
[MUSIC]
Flat 6th.
[MUSIC]
Flat 7th.
[MUSIC]
Flat 3rd.
[MUSIC]
Flat 6th.
[MUSIC]
Flat 7th.
[MUSIC]
Flat 7th.
[MUSIC]
Flat 6th.
[MUSIC]
Flat 3rd.
[MUSIC]
Flat 7th.
[MUSIC]
Flat 6th.
[MUSIC]
Flat 3rd.
[MUSIC]
So many notes are altered,
I never shut up, so,
I'll do it without talking.
[MUSIC]
I can't stress enough,
ho, how to think,
about relating to the notes
you're altering,
from the Major Scale.
It's a very good thing,
when you start visualizing that,
because guitars are a very
pattern-oriented instrument.
And, when you can see those patterns,
begin to develop, and
you can see them in your mind, it'll help
you, grab these notes in your improvising.
As we, as we move on, with this.
Right now, lets go to the, 3rd position.
This is one, with the pinky on the,
sixth string.
[SOUND] Major Scale.
[MUSIC]
It only stretches out there,
with the pinky.
[MUSIC]
One more time.
[MUSIC]
And now, we're gonna do,
with the altered 3rd, 6th, and 7th.
[MUSIC]
Minor 3rd.
[MUSIC]
Minor 6th.
[MUSIC]
Minor 7th.
[MUSIC]
Minor 3rd.
[MUSIC]
Minor 6th.
[MUSIC]
Minor 7th.
[MUSIC]
Minor 7th.
[MUSIC]
Minor 6th.
[MUSIC]
Minor 3rd.
[MUSIC]
Minor 7th.
[MUSIC]
Minor 6th.
[MUSIC]
Minor 3rd.
[MUSIC]
And one.
Without talking.
[MUSIC]
Now,
let's move up to the,
to the A string, and
do the positions
in the A string.
For the A,
you could do it in the open strings.
[MUSIC]
But for now, let's do it in co,
all closed strings, because I want you
to be able to move these to any key.
And so, doing it with the open strings,
obviously wouldn't be the same,
if you were doing it in E,
let's say, or C.
[SOUND] So, we'll do it,
something that you can take, and
move to any key slide up,
and down the neck.
So, we're, on the, first finger,
all the way up on the, twelfth fret.
[MUSIC]
Major Scale is this one.
[MUSIC]
But with a little shift in it,
as we've discussed many times.
And now I'm gonna do it slowly,
telling you where the altered notes are.
So, I'm gonna, lowered the 3rd.
[MUSIC]
6th.
[MUSIC]
7th.
[MUSIC]
And, I'll point it out as we go.
[MUSIC]
Minor 3rd.
[MUSIC]
Minor 6th.
[MUSIC]
Minor 7th,
[MUSIC],
minor 3rd,
[MUSIC]
minor 6th.
[MUSIC]
Minor 7th.
[MUSIC]
Minor 7th.
[MUSIC]
Minor 6th.
[MUSIC]
Minor 3rd.
[MUSIC]
Minor 7th.
[MUSIC]
Minor 6th.
[MUSIC]
Minor 3rd.
[MUSIC]
Played the note, as the last,
last note is a harmonic, just for fun.
[MUSIC]
Okay, and now, I'll do it,
without talking.
[MUSIC]
Now,
go right
to the next
position.
Second finger on the, A string on
the fifth string, twelfth fret.
Major scale.
[MUSIC]
This is one where I go down,
to get the extra notes,
to make it through octaves.
And now, with the alterations.
[MUSIC]
Minor 3rd.
[MUSIC]
Minor 6th.
[MUSIC]
Minor 7th.
[MUSIC]
Minor 3rd.
[MUSIC]
Minor 6th.
[MUSIC]
Minor 3rd.
[MUSIC]
Minor, minor 7th.
[MUSIC]
Minor 6th.
[MUSIC]
Minor 3rd.
[MUSIC]
Minor 7th.
[MUSIC]
Minor 6th.
[MUSIC]
Minor 7th.
Without talking.
[MUSIC]
Now,
we're gonna go to the,
pinky position, the,
last Position number 6,
on the fifth string.
[MUSIC]
This is a Major Scale.
[MUSIC]
That's the one we're gonna alter, the 6th,
7th, and 3rd,
to make a Natural Minor Scale.
And here, I'll put them out.
[MUSIC]
Minor 3rd.
[MUSIC]
Minor 6th.
[MUSIC]
Minor 7th.
[MUSIC]
Minor 3rd.
[MUSIC]
Minor 3rd.
[MUSIC]
Minor 7th.
[MUSIC]
Minor 6th.
[MUSIC]
Minor 3rd.
[MUSIC]
Minor 7th.
[MUSIC]
Minor 6th.
[MUSIC]
Minor 3rd.
[MUSIC]
Minor 6th.
[MUSIC]
Minor 7th.
[MUSIC]
And we land, and now, I will zip it.
[MUSIC]
Natural
Minor.
[MUSIC]