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Fiddle Lessons: Minor Arpeggios

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[MUSIC]
Well,
just like you can't have the darkness
without the light,
the ham without the cheese, the whale
without the killer whale,
the, fiddle without the bow, you've go to
have the minor.
If you're gonna have the majors, so we're
gonna do a minor arpeggio.
Again, we're gonna take every other note,
if we number those notes, the odd-numbered
notes.
Let's try one in D minor.
Remember, our D natural minor scale.
[MUSIC].
So if we take that one, three and five of
that.
[MUSIC]
And then up to the octave, we've got.
[MUSIC].
Right?
So that's another beautiful sound.
Now let's try moving that around just a
little bit.
To make sure we've got those relationships
right.
So let's take an E minor scale.
Starting on the E, let's find the E with
our first finger on the D string.
Just one up from D.
And then.
[MUSIC]
All right.
So we've got.
[MUSIC]
And then.
[MUSIC]
So an arpeggio on that would be.
[MUSIC]
One
[MUSIC] Three. [MUSIC]
Five, one.
[MUSIC]
If we keep going.
[MUSIC]
Let's play that slowly, with me.
One, three, five.
One, three, five.
Three, one,
[LAUGH]
five.
Three, one.
[MUSIC]
Very nice.
So I wrote a little tune called, Welcome
to New York,
that really gives you a minor arpeggio
workout,
so I'm going to play it for you very
slowly, here.
Again, we have a two note pickup.
So, it's one, two, three.
[MUSIC]
So, it's a very, the strong note,
the one note, is actually that minor
three, the G note.
[MUSIC]
So it sounds like this.
One, two, three.
[MUSIC]
So we're kind of stair stepping up.
We're going up a little bit.
And then going back a little bit and then
keeping going.
So we've got.
[MUSIC]
So, we're, we're going up on an E minor
arpeggio.
[MUSIC]
And
then we're coming down on a D major
arpeggio,
[MUSIC]
Which sounds pretty good,
it sounds, like there's, like there's a,
sort of like a question.
And then there's an answer.
We come up again.
[MUSIC]
And then starts over again with a two note
pick up.
One, two, three.
[MUSIC]
Okay, so that is the whole first part, and
then the second part,
more arpeggios, and this is gonna be
interesting, because we have.
This is our first time that we're going to
be doing the the little
afro rhythm it's like a clave type rhythm.
It's like, if we think of two [SOUND],
groups of four beats.
It's gonna be.
[MUSIC].
Right?
So when we fit the notes onto that rhythm,
we get.
[MUSIC]
Right, we get that pattern.
[MUSIC]
So two of these.
[MUSIC]
One more.
[MUSIC]
And then, a two note pattern.
[MUSIC]
So two three's and one two.
[MUSIC]
And
then the whole thing starts over again.
[MUSIC]
So there's two of those and then.
[MUSIC]
And then it jumps back down.
[MUSIC]
Down there.
So here's what it sounds like.
[MUSIC]
So we're using the second half of the A
part to end the B part.
So it all ties together.
[MUSIC]
[MUSIC]
So,
I'm gonna play the second part one more
time.
The whole second part.
1, 2, 3, 4.
[MUSIC]
So, that's the whole second part.
So, the whole thing, sounds, like this.
I'm gonna stay with that, I'm gonna go
even a little slower.
I think this is, you know, this is a lot
of.
I guess you would call it disjunct
notation.
But it all makes sense, you know, if you
think of it as a part of a system
you can almost predict where the next note
is gonna come.
So, one, two, three.
[MUSIC]
Second part.
[MUSIC]
Again.
[MUSIC]
There might be a moment of, unclarity,
of jumping from.
[MUSIC]
All right,
then we get to go back down there pretty
quickly.
It's really not that difficult if we just
know what we're doing,
and play it very slowly.
[MUSIC]
If we isolate that down to just those four
notes.
[MUSIC]
And while we're playing the D note.
[MUSIC]
This note.
While we're playing the D note,
we can be preparing our first finger, over
there on the D string.
[MUSIC]
While I'm playing that D note, I can be.
Getting ready to play that E [INAUDIBLE]
[MUSIC]
Also you'll notice that I'm holding my
fingers down.
So, I'm not going.
[MUSIC]
I'm
actually trying to keep my fingers down,
wherever I can.
So.
[MUSIC]
That third finger can stay down.
[MUSIC]
Now, these, both the third and
first finger can stay down.
[MUSIC]
I can actually play that whole little
piece of the arpeggio without moving any
fingers at all.
[MUSIC]
And I want you to try that.
[MUSIC]
Second finger stays down.
[MUSIC]
And hand comes up.
[MUSIC]
[INAUDIBLE].
[MUSIC]
Great.
Okay, go for it.
Just make sure you're clear about this
arpeggio
business, I want to call for a video from
you,
in which you play six arpeggios.
Three major arpeggios, and three minor
arpeggios, just in one octave.
So, each arpeggio is only four notes.
So starting on a G note, major.
[MUSIC]
And then A note, major.
[MUSIC]
And then a C,
major, which starts on the third finger.
[MUSIC]
Right?
So just name the arpeggio, G major, and
then.
[MUSIC]
A major.
[MUSIC]
C major.
[MUSIC]
And then I want you to do the exact same
thing, with the same starting notes, but
in minor.
So, for instance, it would be G minor.
[MUSIC]
And so forth, you can figure out the rest.
Just to make sure that you're playing
these relationships,
and comfortable with that the way these
things move.
[MUSIC]