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Fiddle Lessons: Two Tactics, One Song: "Way Downtown"

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[MUSIC]
Hi.
We're gonna do a little bit more backup
stuff here, and
we're gonna go back to that tune Way
Downtown.
Scott's gonna sing a verse and the chorus.
There's also a couple of other approaches
that you could take.
You could go very simple, you know,
behind the singer, the singers, depending
on what the singer's singing.
If they're singing complicated stuff, you
definitely wanna go simple.
If they're singing simple melodies, it's
also great to go simple.
You could like, sort of play a harmony
with what's going on.
Very, just smooth it out so that you're
not trying to hit every word.
But just kind of play kind of a skeletal,
kind of a smooth quality.
And there's another way you can do this,
which is real popular in bluegrass music
is that the busy approach
where if you play a, busily but
steadily the notes kind of disappear into
the background.
This is sort of like the banjo principle,
where the banjo just keeps going and
going and going, and note, note, note,
note, note after note, and
finally you just hear it as sort of like
oh, what's that buzzy hum thing?
I just, it's this rolling blah.
And you can, and that can also be done
with just about any instrument, but you
have to keep it going very steadily and
not doing any weird breaks or anything.
So you'd probably be using a lot of scales
and things like that.
So let's try a verse of Way Downtown where
I'll play super simple,
and then when you do the chorus, I'll play
kind of active but
try to keep it just sort of in the
background.
Also, when you're doing this, you probably
don't want to be right on the mic.
You wanna play softly and just very
evenly.
So that could work.
>> Yeah.
>> Or maybe it won't.
>> [LAUGH]
>> Maybe it will.
We'll see.
All right.
So, we'll just do a little tag to start it
off.
Two, three.
[MUSIC]