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Jazz Sax Lessons: Eric's Secret Warm Up: Chromatic Exercise (Soprano Saxophone)

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[MUSIC]
Okay, this is my second
of my three top secret warmup exercises.
So hey, don't tell anybody about these
exercises because they're top secret.
They're not actually top secret.
In fact, I'm sure, obviously,
I didn't invent long tones, and obviously,
I didn't invent scales, and obviously, I
did not invent the chromatic scale either,
so top secret is just sort
of a way to draw you in.
Hopefully, it worked.
So here is number two.
This is my chromatic exercise warmup, and
basically all it is is a chromatic scale.
Boom.
There's one catch to it however.
Instead of just a usual chromatic scale,
which would sound like this.
[MUSIC]
And then down.
[MUSIC]
In the exercise, every other note returns
back to the tonic,
returns back to the first note.
[MUSIC]
So I've taken
the liberty of writing
this out for you.
So you are welcome to
play them along with me.
What I'd like you to do actually,
is play each one two times,
to repeat the whole exercise.
It's kinda up to you, I didn't put that
in the chart intentionally because
that's a lot, to be fair,
it's a lot to repeat each one twice.
I do, I encourage you to.
But it would be beneficial to play
each one one time, totally cool.
It's a lot right there.
So as we play these together however,
we are gonna repeat each line twice.
We're going to repeat them one time,
so you'll play them two times.
Okay.
As with everything else, I want you
to play these with your metronome.
The trick on these is that
if you play them too fast,
they're going to be too difficult,
and if you play them too slow,
it's going to be too long to
play in one breath, one phrase.
So I've got my metronome at what
I feel is kind of happy medium,
I've gotta set it 60 BPM,
so pretty slow, so
you make sure you take a good breath
of air, make sure you tank up.
And warning, the first several are really
hard [LAUGH] how else can I put it?
Make sure that before you
fire up the metronome,
it may be a good idea to play
the low B-flat, the low B version,
the low C version and the low D-flat
version kind of at your own pace just to
figure it out because it is
a serious left pinkie killer.
It's all down here, and
you're gonna feel it.
If you don't feel it down there,
then you're a better human than I.
So be aware of that.
You're gonna feel that in your left hand.
So here we go.
Let's play them with a metronome.
Keep them as even as possible.
I also encourage you too, on your own,
together we're gonna play them
like I normally do which is just legato,
just get the notes out.
But to change up the articulations
on these, so as you get
especially to some of the higher ones,
mix up your articulation please,
some notes short, some notes long,
maybe one note short, three notes long.
Two notes short, two notes long,
three notes short, one note long.
Whatever you wanna do to mix it up and
just expand the advantage
of the exercises.
Okay, so
here we go with my secret warmup exercise,
the chromatic exercise.
Here we go.
[MUSIC]
[MUSIC]
Okay.
Man, if you were able to make it through
all those chromatic exercises at that
tempo, kudos to you.
That was a lot of work and
I think you're very warmed up.
Not 100% warmed up, believe it or
not, you may think you are.
But there's one more exercise
coming up that'll tip the scales.
You'll be completely warmed up,
completely ready to go.
So, stay tuned for top secret
warm up exercise number three.
[MUSIC]