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Jazz Sax Lessons: Phrasing a Melody: Quiet Nights

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[MUSIC]
Okay, now we're going to work on
phrasing the melody of this great
Antonio Carlos Jobim tune Quiet Nights or
corcobado.
So on this the thing about phrasing any
melody is that you always want to take
not only the key that your in and
the tonal centers that your in to account.
But, also, the feel.
And so, unlike a swing tune, this tune is
very obviously very bassa oomph, oomph.
So, it's very even, so everything that we
do that isn't on the paper is gonna be,
any inflection is again gonna be
an enhancement not a detraction.
So when you're playing
this if whatever you do
in your creative phrasing of the melody.
You know we have to really hold true to
the rhythm, especially with this music.
You know the rhythm is what makes it.
So always be justifying,
again thinking on the left brain side.
Making sure that everything's
really justifying exactly with
that metronomic bouncing ball side.
And yeah, you know it's interesting
because with this melody,
it's a gorgeous melody obviously, but
it's very vocal driven, very lyric driven.
So the melody stays right for
us E-flat people.
Right in that C-Sharp, B area alot for
the first half of the song.
And so, in order to make it interesting,
what makes it interesting when you
sing it obviously are the lyrics
as a story being told.
But when we play we also wanna
keep that story alive in the way
that we're phrasing our melody.
So let me do this for you,
I'll play it down one time and
you'll just get a kind of a cool feel
of what the melody feels like but
you're gonna hear me play it two times.
You're gonna,
I'm gonna take the repeat on the paper.
Again, on this lesson you're
gonna see your sheet so
if you're playing tenor you're gonna
see the B flat tenor and soprano chart,
and I'm reading obviously off the E
flat alto and baritone chart.
So here is Quiet Nights.
[NOISE] And one, two.
[MUSIC]
Okay,
so just
like I
were on
a gig,
if I
were
playing
this
song
I'd
play it
a lot
just
like
the way
I just
did.
In that,
I really wanna pay respect to the melody.
One of my pet peeves is when somebody
takes a melody like this that's so
beautiful and just beats it beyond
recognition with so many different things.
So I wanted to phrase it
with different ideas.
So you had an example of what to do.
But I kind of urge you to on
a melody like this, so classic,
to whatever you do that's different
than what is a standard melody,
make sure that it's something
that's really going to add.
It's not just like fluff.
I played it twice, so that I would
naturally sort of you know play it
a little bit differently so you'd have you
know just two different examples of how I
would phrase it and you know the natural
tendency, which is important,
is that when you phrase a melody
you're playing two times.
The second time you know you're not
going to want to play it exactly the way
you did before.
Unless, that's what the music calls for.
But if not, on a song like this,
on the repeat of the song,
you're going to want to make it
a little bit more interesting just so
that the listener, more interesting for
us as players to right?
But the people who we're playing for
they've heard it one way and
some extra little spice here and
there is gonna be appropriate, but
again, just making sure that everything
you do always adds, do not subtract.
Enhance, don't detract.
So when you're adding any kind of
inflection make sure it's something that's
enhancing the time,
not taking away from the time.
Enhancing the harmony.
So little things here and there,
I add little improvisations actually but
things that were, again, appropriate and
not detracting, always adding to.
So have fun with this one, I can't wait
to hear you play that if you are so
inclined to send in your video.
With you playing this over
this really cool track.
That'll be great and
I'll be sure to make my comments for you.
All right.
Have fun.
[MUSIC]
[MUSIC]
>> Okay,
so just like I were on a gig,
if I were playing this song,
I would play it a lot just
like the way I just did,
in that I really want to
pay respect to the melody.
One of my pet peeves is when somebody
takes a melody like this that's so
beautiful and just beats it beyond
recognition with so many different things.
I mean, I wanted to phrase it with
different ideas so you had an example of
what to do, but I kind of urge you on
a melody like this, it's so classic.
To you know,
whatever you do that's different
than what gives it standard melody.
Make sure it's something
that's really going to add.
It's just not like fluff.
I played it twice so
that I would naturally sort of
play it a little bit differently.
So you'd have just two different
examples of how I would phrase it.
And the natural tendency,
which is important,
is that when you phrase a melody
that you're playing two times.
The second time you're not gonna wanna
play it exactly the way you did before,
unless that's what the music calls for.
But if not, on a song like this,
on the repeat of this song,
you're gonna wanna make it a little
bit more interesting, just so
that the listener, more interesting for
us as players too, right?
But the people who we're playing for,
they've heard it one way, and
some extra little spice here and
there is gonna be appropriate.
But again, just making sure
that everything you do adds,
always adds, do not subtract,
enhance, don't detract.
So when you're adding any kind of
inflection, make sure that it's something
that's enhancing the time, not taking away
from the time, enhancing the harmony.
So little things here and there, I'd add
little improvisations, actually, but
things that were again appropriate and
not detracting, always adding to.
So have fun with this one.
I can't wait to hear you play that if you
are so inclined to send in your video,
with you playing this over
this really cool track.
That would be great.
I will be sure to make my comments for
you.
All right.
Have fun.
[MUSIC]