This is a public version of the members-only Country Guitar with Guthrie Trapp, at ArtistWorks. Functionality is limited, but CLICK HERE for full access if you’re ready to take your playing to the next level.

These lessons are available only to members of Country Guitar with Guthrie Trapp.
Join Now

Beginner Country Guitar
 ≡ 
Intermediate Country Guitar
 ≡ 
Advanced Country Guitar
 ≡ 
30 Day Challenge
 ≡ 
+Music
 ≡ 
«Prev of Next»

Electric Country Guitar Lessons: Playing with Feeling and Taste: Bends and Memphis Licks

Lesson Video Exchanges () submit video Submit a Video Lesson Study Materials () This lesson calls for a video submission
Study Materials Quizzes
information below Close
information below
Lesson Specific Downloads
Play Along Tracks
Backing Tracks +
Written Materials +

+Beginner Country Guitar

+Intermediate Country Guitar

+Advanced Country Guitar

Additional Materials +
Close
resource information below Close
Collaborations for
resource information below Close
Submit a video for   
Electric Country Guitar

This video lesson is available only to members of
Country Guitar with Guthrie Trapp.

Join Now

information below Close
Information
 ≡ 
Course Description
 ≡ 

This page contains a transcription of a video lesson from Country Guitar with Guthrie Trapp. This is only a preview of what you get when you take Electric Country Guitar Lessons at ArtistWorks. The transcription is only one of the valuable tools we provide our online members. Sign up today for unlimited access to all lessons, plus submit videos to your teacher for personal feedback on your playing.

CLICK HERE for full access.
X
X
X
[MUSIC]
>> Okay,
in this next little lesson here we're
gonna just cover a couple of things and
I'm going to talk a little bit and
play a little bit about,
go over playing with some feeling and
some taste in your playing.
And once you get to where
you can play some licks and
you're playing some solos and you're kind
of starting to improvise a little bit and
you might even play in a local band or
a touring band or whatever you're doing.
Now I'll find out more about that as we
do the video exchanges what you're up to.
So the thing about this is I just wanna
cover a couple little ideas about
bending and really pulling
some tone out of your guitar.
And also when you're playing
with other people kind of
a little bit of about just listening
in being aware of that kind of stuff.
If you're on stage with
a bunch of people in a band,
the last person you should
be listening to is yourself.
Listen to everybody else and
hear what they're doing,
listen to the singer or
whoever is soloing,
that's the most important part
that you need to be supporting.
So, there's all these things and
we'll talk more about that as we get
on into some other segments, but
as far and that has to do with taste and
some etiquette of playing music.
But the thing that I wanna go over now
is just when you're bending these notes,
and you're hitting the guitar strings with
your right hand, there's a way to do this.
Where you're really kind of pulling
the tone out of here and you're gripping,
you really wanna make a great
connection with your left hand.
And really you can really do
some nice vibrato and some even,
like vibrato like this, I haven't
really covered anything like that yet,
so I just wanna take, let's get up in C.
[MUSIC].
And we're just gonna take one note and
we're just gonna bend that note and
really try to get the most
feeling that we can out of that.
So, we're just gonna take this C,
[MUSIC]
and we're just gonna bend
from G
[MUSIC]
up to A,
right here so,
[MUSIC]
we're gonna bend up,
then we're gonna release back down.
[MUSIC]
And when you release back down,
I want you to do a little vibrato and it
just, really focus on the meatier finger.
Really, just feeling that
wood underneath that string.
Your finger board, so,
[MUSIC]
so, right there I'm bending,
again I'm bending from D up to E
[MUSIC].
So, we're bending here
[MUSIC].
So instead of playing those with
single notes,
[MUSIC].
That's what that would sound like
[MUSIC]
without bending them.
So when we bend that,
[MUSIC]
we're really getting a lot more soul out
of that than we are playing
the single notes.
So that's something to focus on too,
just really really working on like,
man how soulful can I make that bend.
And you don't think of
soulful when you think of hot
chicken picking guitar but
there's ways to do it,
there's ways to incorporate this
in with that style, to make it.
It should be soulful and
bluesy to me, cuz I mean,
country and blues are,
in my opinion, very,
very related as far as how we approach
playing that stuff on the guitar.
So even these bends, I haven't done
a whole lot of three-string bends
[MUSIC]
and we'll get to that coming up
[MUSIC].
But we have been doing
some two-note bends and
I wanted to show you like,
let's get on your middle pick up and
then even something like this,
when you're banding
up with this hybrid technique
[MUSIC]
so I'm bending up
[MUSIC]
hitting twice
[MUSIC].
And I'm really just trying to get as much
feeling out of it as I can
[MUSIC].
And I don't wanna,
it shouldn't be a jerky or
a fast motion
[MUSIC]
unless, I mean depending on what song but
this should be like a lonesome sound.
[MUSIC]
So when you bend up,
[MUSIC]
you're emulating a steel guitar, so
the first note up is gonna
be a little bit faster,
[MUSIC]
it's gonna have that mechanism kinda
sound.
[MUSIC]
Which, when you come down,
[MUSIC]
you can really milk that note
[MUSIC]
and this kind of stuff here where we're
gonna bend, I'll show you this bend.
And we're gonna bend
from the high E string,
[MUSIC]
and we're gonna bend
[MUSIC]
so we're gonna bend here
[MUSIC]
so that's high E and then F sharp
[MUSIC]
up to G sharp
[MUSIC]
which is your third of the E chord
[MUSIC].
So we're gonna go
[MUSIC]
back a half step
[MUSIC]
and then
[MUSIC]
so it's the same bend
[MUSIC]
and then back down.
We're keeping this high string
on going the whole time,
we're just playing the high E and the G.
So what I'm saying about this bend,
is just trying to get really
the most feeling out of it that you can
[MUSIC]
and that bend up is really just slow,
super slow
[MUSIC]
and it comes back down to
[MUSIC]
like an E7 there.
So just, that kind of stuff and then when
you're planning some of these like a,
we're getting into some like
these Memphis style licks here.
And so if you're in, say we're in C,
[MUSIC]
you can do these things kind of what
we did on that intro a while ago.
We went just these two notes
[MUSIC].
So we're doing this little slide,
[MUSIC],
just two notes here
[MUSIC],
bar chord C
[MUSIC],
D shaped C
[MUSIC],
bar chord C
[MUSIC],
and then
the A shaped C
[MUSIC],
so
[MUSIC]
and that's like a Reggie Young style kind
of lick the famous Memphis session player.
So we went here
[MUSIC]
slide with your E and B string
[MUSIC]
whole step and then whole step here
[MUSIC].
So this also can be played like this
[MUSIC]
so that's a great little lick
[MUSIC]
and it's not necessarily a hard
core country lick but you can use this
on ballads and some other stuff.
So there's a couple of different ways
you can do it you can do it like that
[MUSIC]
or you can do it here
[MUSIC],
just all the same, so
[MUSIC]
and this is where I call that
Hendricks position
[MUSIC]
because there's all this stuff
out of there
[MUSIC].
And I'm just hammering on,
I'm barring this triad,
[MUSIC]
and hammering on like that
[MUSIC]
so that's just playing,
trying to play some soulful stuff,
tasteful, some nice bends.
You don't have to do,
if you're backing up a singer,
just play some nice bends and fills,
a la what I just played there.
But, the main thing is,
don't over play and
if it's time to take a burning solo,
you can do that.
But, just try to be tasteful, and
listen to who's playing around you,
and just focus on playing
some nice tasteful stuff.
Less notes, some slides, some bends
kind of focusing on that kind of stuff.
So we're gonna move on to the next one.
[MUSIC]